Top 41 Slang For Guatemalan – Meaning & Usage

Guatemala, a vibrant country known for its rich culture and warm people, also has its own unique slang that adds flavor to everyday conversations. Whether you’re planning a trip to this beautiful Central American nation or simply interested in expanding your linguistic horizons, we’ve got you covered with our list of top Guatemalan slang words. Get ready to immerse yourself in the local lingo and connect with the people of Guatemala in a whole new way!

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1. Chapín/Chapina

This term is used to refer to a person from Guatemala. It is a colloquial term commonly used by Guatemalans themselves.

  • For example, a Guatemalan might say, “Soy chapín/a” meaning “I am Guatemalan.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “Have you met any chapines during your trip to Guatemala?”
  • A person might describe a friend as “mi amigo chapín” meaning “my Guatemalan friend.”

2. ¡Aguas!

This phrase is used to warn someone or draw attention to a potential danger or problem. It is similar to saying “Be careful!” or “Look out!”

  • For instance, if someone is about to step on a slippery surface, you might say, “¡Aguas!”
  • In a crowded market, someone might shout, “¡Aguas! There’s a pickpocket around!”
  • A person might warn their friend, “¡Aguas! The floor is wet and slippery.”

3. Pisto

This term is used to refer to money or cash in Guatemala. It is a slang term commonly used in informal settings.

  • For example, someone might say, “No tengo pisto” meaning “I don’t have money.”
  • In a discussion about finances, a person might ask, “¿Cuánto pisto tienes?” meaning “How much money do you have?”
  • A friend might offer to lend money by saying, “Te presto un poco de pisto” meaning “I can lend you some money.”

4. Chispudo/a

This term is used to describe someone who is clever or quick-witted. It can also refer to someone who is crafty or resourceful.

  • For instance, if someone comes up with a clever solution to a problem, you might say, “¡Eres muy chispudo/a!” meaning “You’re very clever!”
  • In a conversation about problem-solving, someone might say, “Necesitamos a alguien chispudo/a para resolver esto” meaning “We need someone clever to solve this.”
  • A person might compliment their friend by saying, “Siempre eres chispudo/a” meaning “You’re always clever.”

5. Dos que tres

This phrase is used to indicate that something is nearby or just around the corner. It can also mean “in a short amount of time.”

  • For example, if someone asks, “¿Cuánto falta para llegar?” meaning “How much longer until we arrive?” you can respond, “Dos que tres.”
  • In a conversation about finishing a task, someone might say, “Termino dos que tres” meaning “I’ll finish in a short amount of time.”
  • A person might describe a restaurant as “dos que tres” meaning “it’s just around the corner.”

6. Guatemalteco/a

This term refers to a person from Guatemala. It is used to identify someone’s nationality or origin.

  • For example, “She is a proud Guatemalteca living in the United States.”
  • In a conversation about different cultures, someone might say, “I have a friend who is Guatemalteco, and he taught me a lot about his country.”
  • When discussing travel plans, a person might ask, “Have you ever been to Guatemala? I heard the Guatemaltecos are very welcoming.”

7. ¡Aguas con el tráfico!

This phrase is used to warn someone about the traffic or to be cautious while driving or crossing the road.

  • For instance, “¡Aguas con el tráfico! There’s a lot of congestion on the main road.”
  • When giving directions, a person might say, “Turn left at the next intersection, but ¡aguas con el tráfico!”
  • In a conversation about commuting, someone might mention, “I always leave early to avoid the rush hour. ¡Aguas con el tráfico!”

8. Broke

This term is used to describe someone who has no money or is financially struggling.

  • For example, “I can’t go out tonight, I’m broke.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, someone might say, “I need to save money because I’m always broke by the end of the month.”
  • When talking about a friend’s financial situation, a person might comment, “He’s been broke for a while and is looking for a job.”

9. Chispa

This word is often used to describe someone who is lively, energetic, or has a spark of enthusiasm.

  • For instance, “She has so much chispa, she always brings positive energy to the room.”
  • When talking about a performer, someone might say, “His chispa on stage is captivating.”
  • In a conversation about motivation, a person might mention, “I need to find my chispa again, I’ve been feeling uninspired lately.”

10. Grasp

In Guatemalan slang, “grasp” is used to mean understanding or comprehending something.

  • For example, “I finally grasped the concept after studying it for hours.”
  • In a discussion about a complicated topic, someone might say, “It took me a while to grasp the complexity of the subject.”
  • When explaining a difficult task, a person might say, “Let me break it down for you so you can grasp the process.”

11. Guatemalan

This term refers to a person from Guatemala, the Central American country. It is used to identify someone’s nationality or ethnicity.

  • For example, “My friend is a Guatemalan and she loves to cook traditional Guatemalan dishes.”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “I met a group of Guatemalans while backpacking through Central America.”
  • A person might proudly state, “I am a Guatemalan and I am proud of my culture and heritage.”

12. ¡A huevos!

This phrase is used to express agreement or affirmation. It is similar to saying “absolutely” or “definitely” in English.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you want to go to the party tonight?” you can respond with “¡A huevos!” to mean “Yes, definitely!”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s go to the beach tomorrow, ¡a huevos!”
  • A person might use this phrase to show enthusiasm and agreement, saying, “¡A huevos! I’m in!”

13. Cabal

This word is used to mean “exactly” or “precisely.” It is often used to emphasize agreement or to confirm that something is correct.

  • For example, if someone says, “The meeting is at 3:00 PM,” you can respond with “Cabal” to mean “Exactly.”
  • In a conversation about plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet at the park, cabal?” to confirm the agreement.
  • A person might use this word to show understanding and agreement, saying, “Cabal, I know what you mean.”

14. Casaca

This term refers to a jacket or coat. It is commonly used to describe a piece of outerwear.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Do you have a casaca to keep you warm?” they are asking if you have a jacket to stay warm.
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “I love your casaca, where did you get it?”
  • A person might comment on the weather, saying, “It’s getting cold, I need to wear my casaca.”

15. Peluche

This word is used to refer to a stuffed animal or plush toy. It is often used to describe a soft and cuddly toy.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Do you still have your childhood peluche?” they are asking if you still have your childhood stuffed animal.
  • In a conversation about gifts, someone might say, “I bought a peluche for my niece’s birthday.”
  • A person might reminisce about their childhood, saying, “I used to sleep with my peluche every night.”

16. Sanigua

This term is used to describe someone who is cunning or deceitful. It refers to a person who often plays tricks or manipulates others for their own benefit.

  • For example, “Watch out for that guy, he’s a real sanigua.”
  • In a conversation about a dishonest individual, someone might say, “He pulled off a sanigua move and swindled everyone.”
  • A person might warn their friend, “Don’t trust him, he’s a known sanigua.”

17. Patajo

This word is used to refer to a close-knit group of friends or a tight circle. It signifies a strong bond and camaraderie among individuals.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my patajo tonight.”
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might say, “Having a patajo is essential for a fulfilling social life.”
  • A person might introduce their friends by saying, “These are my patajo, we’ve been together since high school.”

18. Pelar

This term is used to describe the act of peeling or removing the skin or outer layer of something. In slang, it can also mean to cheat or deceive someone.

  • For example, “Can you help me pelar these potatoes?”
  • In a conversation about cheating, someone might say, “He tried to pelar me out of my money.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically and say, “I need to pelar off these layers and show my true self.”

19. Shute

This word is used as a slang term for shooting or firing a gun. It can also refer to the act of taking a shot of alcohol.

  • For instance, “He shuted the target with perfect aim.”
  • In a conversation about a drinking game, someone might say, “Let’s take a shute and see who can hold their liquor.”
  • A person might use the term metaphorically and say, “I’m ready to shute my shot and go after my dreams.”

20. Chapín

This term is used to refer to a person from Guatemala. It is a colloquial term often used by Guatemalans themselves to identify themselves or others from their country.

  • For example, “He’s a proud chapín, always representing Guatemala.”
  • In a discussion about cultural identity, someone might say, “Being a chapín means embracing our rich heritage.”
  • A person might introduce themselves by saying, “I’m a chapín, born and raised in Guatemala.”

21. Guate

This term is used as a shorthand way to refer to Guatemala or anything related to the country.

  • For example, a Guatemalan might say, “I’m proud to be from Guate!”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might ask, “Have you ever been to Guate?”
  • A person might describe a Guatemalan dish as “authentic Guate cuisine.”
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22. Chilero/a

This word is used to describe something or someone that is cool, awesome, or impressive. It is often used to express admiration or approval.

  • For instance, a person might say, “That concert was chilero!”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might compliment a stylish outfit by saying, “You look chilera!”
  • A Guatemalan might describe a breathtaking view as “muy chilera.”

23. Patojo/a

This term is used to refer to a young person, especially a teenager or someone in their early twenties. It can be used to describe someone’s age or to address them directly.

  • For example, a person might say, “I used to be a patojo back in the day.”
  • In a conversation about a group of friends, someone might ask, “Are there any patojos coming to the party?”
  • A Guatemalan might greet a young person by saying, “Hey, patojo!”

24. Chilero

This word is used to describe something or someone that is cool, awesome, or impressive. It is often used to express admiration or approval.

  • For instance, a person might say, “That concert was chilero!”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might compliment a stylish outfit by saying, “You look chilero!”
  • A Guatemalan might describe a breathtaking view as “muy chilero.”

25. Chafa

This term is used to describe something that is of low quality or poorly made. It can be used to criticize or express disappointment in something.

  • For example, a person might say, “Don’t buy that shirt, it’s chafa.”
  • In a conversation about a restaurant, someone might warn, “The food there is chafa, don’t bother.”
  • A Guatemalan might describe a fake or counterfeit item as “muy chafa.”

26. Chiltepe

Chiltepe is a type of chili pepper that is commonly used in Guatemalan cuisine. It is known for its spicy flavor and is often used to add heat to dishes.

  • For example, a recipe might call for “2 teaspoons of chopped chiltepe.”
  • A person discussing Guatemalan cuisine might say, “Chiltepe is a key ingredient in many traditional dishes.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I buy chiltepe in the United States?”

27. Patojo

Patojo is a slang term used to refer to a young person in Guatemala. It is similar to the English term “youngster” or “kid.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “There were a group of patojos playing soccer in the park.”
  • A person discussing generational differences might say, “Patojos these days have access to so much technology.”
  • Another might ask, “What do patojos do for fun in Guatemala?”

28. Chispudo

Chispudo is a slang term used to describe someone who is clever or quick-witted in Guatemala. It is similar to the English term “sharp” or “quick on the uptake.”

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always coming up with clever solutions. He’s so chispudo.”
  • A person discussing a smart strategy might say, “That’s a chispudo move.”
  • Another might compliment someone’s intelligence by saying, “You’re one chispudo individual.”

29. Chula

Chula is a slang term used to describe someone or something as beautiful or attractive in Guatemala. It is similar to the English term “beautiful” or “gorgeous.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “She looks absolutely chula in that dress.”
  • A person complimenting a piece of artwork might say, “That painting is chula.”
  • Another might describe a scenic view as “chula.”
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30. Chilanga

Chilanga is a slang term used to refer to a woman from Mexico City in Guatemala. It is similar to the English term “Mexican City girl.”

  • For example, someone might say, “She’s a chilanga who moved to Guatemala.”
  • A person discussing cultural differences might say, “Chilangas have a unique style.”
  • Another might ask, “What are some popular chilanga dishes?”

31. Chivar

This slang term is used to describe the act of getting drunk or intoxicated. It is commonly used among Guatemalans to refer to a night of heavy drinking.

  • For example, “Let’s go out tonight and chivar!”
  • A friend might say, “I chivared so much last night, I can’t remember anything.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you up for chivaring this weekend?”

32. Chuchito

This word is used to affectionately refer to a small dog or child in Guatemalan slang. It is a term of endearment often used by parents or pet owners.

  • For instance, “Look at that cute little chuchito!”
  • A parent might say, “Come here, chuchito, let me give you a hug.”
  • Someone might ask, “Can I pet your chuchito?”

33. Chispas

In Guatemalan slang, “chispas” is used to refer to fireworks. It is a common word used during celebrations or festivals.

  • For example, “Let’s buy some chispas for New Year’s Eve.”
  • During a fireworks show, someone might say, “Look at those beautiful chispas!”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you want to light some chispas tonight?”

34. Chimbomba

This slang term is used to describe a big mess or chaos in Guatemalan slang. It can refer to a messy situation or a disorganized environment.

  • For instance, “My room is a chimbomba, I need to clean up.”
  • Someone might say, “The party last night was a chimbomba, there was stuff everywhere.”
  • A friend might ask, “How did your presentation go? Did it turn into a chimbomba?”

35. Chirizo

In Guatemalan slang, “chirizo” is used to refer to a sausage. It is a common term used when talking about food or cooking.

  • For example, “I’m going to grill some chirizos for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I love the flavor of Guatemalan chirizo.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you want some chirizo in your breakfast burrito?”

36. Chirrisco

A Guatemalan street food made with grilled meat, usually chicken or beef. It is typically served with tortillas and various condiments.

  • For example, “Let’s go grab some chirrisco for lunch.”
  • A Guatemalan food enthusiast might say, “Chirrisco is a must-try dish when visiting Guatemala.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where can I find the best chirrisco in town?”

37. Cuate

A slang term used to refer to a close friend or buddy in Guatemala. It is similar to the English term “mate” or “buddy”.

  • For instance, “Hey cuate, want to hang out later?”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my cuate, we’ve known each other for years.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have any cuate that can help us with this project?”

38. Jupa

A Guatemalan slang term for a party or a gathering. It is commonly used among young people to refer to a social event or celebration.

  • For example, “Are you going to the jupa tonight?”
  • A person might say, “I’m organizing a jupa at my place, you’re invited.”
  • Someone might ask, “Where’s the jupa happening?”

39. Chompipe

A colloquial term used in Guatemala to refer to a turkey. It is often used in a playful or humorous way.

  • For instance, “Let’s have chompipe for Thanksgiving dinner.”
  • A person might joke, “I feel like a chompipe after eating so much.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know where I can buy a live chompipe for Christmas?”

40. Chamba

A slang term used in Guatemala to refer to a job or work. It can be used to describe both formal and informal employment.

  • For example, “I found a new chamba, starting next week.”
  • A person might complain, “I’ve been looking for chamba for months and still no luck.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know of any chamba opportunities in the city?”

41. Chilango

This term is used to refer to someone from Mexico City. It is derived from the Nahuatl word “Chilangotl,” meaning “place of dogs.” The term can be used both affectionately and derogatorily.

  • For example, “My friend is a Chilango, so he knows all the best places to eat in Mexico City.”
  • In a conversation about regional accents, someone might say, “Chilangos have a distinct way of speaking.”
  • A person might use it in a teasing manner and say, “Watch out for that Chilango, they think they’re better than everyone else.”