Top 20 Slang For Employed – Meaning & Usage

Being part of the workforce comes with its own set of terms and phrases that can leave you feeling a bit lost. But fear not, we’ve got you covered. Our team has put together a list of the top slang for the employed that will not only keep you in the loop but also have you nodding along like a seasoned pro. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your workplace lingo game with our handy guide!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. On the clock

This phrase is used to describe someone who is currently working or actively engaged in their job. It implies that the person is being paid for their time and is expected to be productive.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Is Sarah available for a meeting?” a colleague might respond, “No, she’s on the clock right now.”
  • During a work shift, a supervisor might remind their employees, “Remember, we’re all on the clock, so let’s stay focused.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you free for lunch?” and you might reply, “Sorry, I’m on the clock until 1 pm.”

2. Punching the clock

This phrase refers to the act of recording one’s time of arrival and departure from work by using a time clock or a similar method. It suggests a routine and often implies a lack of flexibility or autonomy in one’s work schedule.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve been punching the clock at this job for five years.”
  • When discussing work-life balance, a person might comment, “I’m tired of punching the clock every day. I want a job that allows for more flexibility.”
  • In a conversation about employment, someone might ask, “Do you punch the clock at your current job?”

3. Nine-to-fiver

This term refers to someone who works regular office hours, typically from 9 am to 5 pm. It is often used to describe someone who has a stable job with predictable hours and a routine work schedule.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I envy your schedule as a nine-to-fiver. I never know when my shifts will be.”
  • When discussing work-life balance, a person might say, “Being a nine-to-fiver allows me to spend evenings and weekends with my family.”
  • In a job interview, an employer might ask, “Are you comfortable with being a nine-to-fiver?”

4. Gainfully employed

This phrase is used to describe someone who is employed and earning a regular income. It implies that the person is engaged in legitimate work and is financially stable.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m gainfully employed as a software engineer.”
  • When discussing job security, a person might comment, “I’m grateful to be gainfully employed in this uncertain economy.”
  • In a conversation about unemployment, someone might ask, “How long have you been gainfully employed at your current job?”

5. Bringing home the bacon

This phrase is used to describe someone who is working and providing financial support for themselves or their family. It implies that the person is responsible for earning money and contributing to household expenses.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I work hard to bring home the bacon and provide for my children.”
  • When discussing financial independence, a person might comment, “I’m proud to say that I bring home the bacon and don’t rely on anyone else.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might ask, “What kind of job allows you to bring home the bacon?”

6. Working for the man

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is employed by a company or organization and is subject to the authority and control of their superiors.

  • For example, a disgruntled employee might say, “I’m tired of working for the man. I want to be my own boss.”
  • Someone might complain, “Working for the man means following all these unnecessary rules.”
  • A person might boast, “I’m proud to be working for the man. It’s a stable job with good benefits.”

7. Clocking in

This term refers to the act of officially recording the time that one arrives at work, usually by using a time clock or electronic system.

  • For instance, a coworker might ask, “Did you remember to clock in this morning?”
  • A supervisor might remind an employee, “Don’t forget to clock in when you arrive.”
  • Someone might complain, “Clocking in and out every day feels like a waste of time.”

8. Holding down a job

This phrase means to have and keep a job for a significant period of time, often implying stability and reliability in one’s employment.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “How’s your new job? Are you holding it down?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been holding down a job at the same company for over 10 years.”
  • Someone might offer advice, “If you want to hold down a job, you need to be punctual and dependable.”

9. Putting in work

This expression means to dedicate oneself to working hard and putting in a significant amount of effort in a job or task.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I’ve been putting in work on this project all week.”
  • A person might boast, “I always put in work and give my best effort in everything I do.”
  • Someone might encourage others, “If you want to succeed, you have to put in the work.”

10. Making ends meet

This phrase refers to the ability to earn enough income to cover one’s basic expenses and financial obligations.

  • For example, a friend might ask, “How are you managing to make ends meet with your current job?”
  • A person might say, “I work two jobs to make ends meet and support my family.”
  • Someone might discuss their financial struggles, “It’s tough to make ends meet with the rising cost of living.”

11. Working the grind

This phrase refers to someone who is putting in a lot of effort and time into their job or work. It implies that the person is dedicated and committed to their work.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I see you’re working the grind today, keep up the good work!”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “I’ve been working the grind lately, but I’m trying to find more time for myself.”
  • A manager might praise an employee by saying, “You’ve been working the grind and it’s really paying off.”

12. Gainfully occupied

This term describes someone who is not only employed but also actively engaged in their work. It indicates that the person is productive and making good use of their time on the job.

  • For instance, a friend might ask, “Are you gainfully occupied these days?”
  • In a discussion about job satisfaction, someone might say, “I feel more fulfilled when I’m gainfully occupied.”
  • A career counselor might advise a client, “It’s important to find a job where you feel gainfully occupied and challenged.”

13. On the job

This phrase simply means that someone is actively working or performing their job duties. It implies that the person is present and focused on their work.

  • For example, a colleague might ask, “Are you on the job today?”
  • In a conversation about work responsibilities, someone might say, “I have a lot on the job right now, but I’m managing.”
  • A supervisor might remind their team, “Remember to stay focused and on the job during work hours.”

14. Working the daily grind

This expression refers to someone who is working their regular or typical job duties. It implies that the person is going through the daily routine of work.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “I’m just working the daily grind, nothing out of the ordinary.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might mention, “I try to find small joys in the midst of working the daily grind.”
  • A team leader might acknowledge their team’s efforts by saying, “Thank you all for working the daily grind and consistently delivering.”

15. Gainfully engaged

This term describes someone who is not only employed but also actively participating and involved in their work. It suggests that the person is committed and motivated in their job.

  • For example, a coworker might say, “I can see that you’re gainfully engaged in your projects.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might mention, “I feel more fulfilled when I’m gainfully engaged in meaningful work.”
  • A manager might recognize an employee’s dedication by saying, “You’ve been consistently gainfully engaged, and it’s making a difference in our team’s performance.”

16. On the job hunt

This phrase refers to actively searching for employment opportunities. It implies that the person is actively seeking job openings and submitting applications.

  • For example, “After graduating from college, I went on the job hunt and applied to various companies.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been on the job hunt for months and still haven’t found anything.”
  • Another might ask, “Are you currently on the job hunt or are you already employed?”

17. Working the 9 to 5 grind

This phrase refers to the typical working hours of a full-time job, usually from 9 AM to 5 PM. It implies that the person is following a routine and working a traditional schedule.

  • For instance, “I’m tired of working the 9 to 5 grind. I need a change.”
  • A person might complain, “Working the 9 to 5 grind feels like a never-ending cycle.”
  • Another might say, “I enjoy working the 9 to 5 grind because it gives me structure and stability.”

18. Grinding

This term is used to describe someone who is working hard and putting in a lot of effort. It can refer to both physical labor and mental exertion.

  • For example, “I’ve been grinding at work all day to meet the deadline.”
  • A person might say, “I respect those who are constantly grinding to achieve their goals.”
  • Another might ask, “Are you still grinding on that project or did you finish?”

19. Working stiff

This phrase refers to a person who works diligently and consistently. It can imply that the person is dedicated to their job but may not have much flexibility or free time.

  • For instance, “He’s a real working stiff. He’s always at the office.”
  • A person might say, “I feel like a working stiff with all the overtime I’ve been doing.”
  • Another might comment, “Working stiffs like us don’t have time for leisure activities during the week.”

20. Wage slave

This term is used to describe someone who feels trapped or oppressed by their job due to low wages or unfavorable working conditions. It implies a lack of autonomy and a dependence on the income from the job.

  • For example, “I can’t stand being a wage slave. I need to find a way out.”
  • A person might say, “I refuse to be a wage slave. I’m going to start my own business.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you ever feel like a wage slave, working just to pay the bills?”
See also  Top 30 Slang For Dream – Meaning & Usage