Top 47 Slang For End – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the end of something, there are countless slang words and phrases that we use in everyday conversation. From casual conversations to social media posts, we’ve rounded up the top slang for “end” that you need to know. So whether you’re looking to upgrade your vocabulary or simply want to stay in the loop, this listicle has got you covered. Get ready to discover some fun and trendy ways to talk about the end!

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1. Wrap up

To finish or bring something to an end. “Wrap up” is a casual way to express the act of ending or completing a task or activity.

  • For example, in a meeting, the team leader might say, “Let’s wrap up this discussion and move on to the next agenda item.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “It’s time to wrap up the class and gather your belongings.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I need to wrap up this call and get back to work.”

2. Call it a day

To decide to stop working or doing something for the rest of the day. This phrase is commonly used to indicate the end of a workday or a particular activity.

  • For instance, at the end of a long day of construction, a worker might say, “Let’s call it a day and continue tomorrow.”
  • A student studying late into the night might say, “I’m exhausted. Time to call it a day and get some rest.”
  • In a sports practice, a coach might say, “Great effort today, team. Let’s call it a day and come back fresh tomorrow.”

3. Finish off

To complete or conclude something, often with a final action or effort. “Finish off” implies the last step or final touch needed to bring something to an end.

  • For example, a chef might say, “I’ll finish off the dish with a sprinkle of fresh herbs.”
  • In a project, someone might say, “I just need to finish off this last section and then we’re done.”
  • In a game, a player might declare, “I’m going to finish off my opponent with this move.”

4. Close out

To complete or bring something to an end, often with a final action or step. “Close out” is commonly used in business or financial contexts to refer to the finalization of accounts or transactions.

  • For instance, a financial advisor might say, “We need to close out your investment account before we can proceed.”
  • At the end of a conference, an organizer might announce, “Let’s close out the event with a final round of applause.”
  • In a project, a team leader might say, “We’re almost there. Let’s close out the remaining tasks and celebrate our success.”

5. Wind down

To gradually bring something to an end or reduce its intensity. “Wind down” implies a gradual decrease in activity or energy.

  • For example, after a long day at work, someone might say, “I need to wind down and relax for a bit.”
  • In a fitness class, the instructor might guide the participants, “Let’s start winding down with some gentle stretches.”
  • At the end of a party, a host might suggest, “It’s time to wind down and say goodbye to our guests.”

6. Put an end to

This phrase means to bring something to a complete stop or to bring about the end of something.

  • For example, “It’s time to put an end to this argument and find a solution.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to put an end to these delays and finish on time.”
  • A person might declare, “I’m going to put an end to these bad habits and start living a healthier lifestyle.”

7. Draw to a close

This expression means to come to an end or to reach a conclusion.

  • For instance, “As the day drew to a close, we watched the sunset over the horizon.”
  • In a conversation about a book, someone might say, “The story draws to a close with a surprising twist.”
  • A person discussing a relationship might say, “Our time together has drawn to a close, and it’s time to move on.”

8. Bring to a halt

This phrase means to cause something to stop suddenly or abruptly.

  • For example, “The loud noise brought the party to a halt.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to bring these delays to a halt and get back on track.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The unexpected announcement brought the entire room to a halt.”

9. Wrap things up

This expression means to complete or finish something.

  • For instance, “Let’s wrap things up and head home.”
  • In a conversation about a meeting, someone might say, “We need to wrap things up and finalize the action items.”
  • A person might suggest, “Before we leave, let’s wrap things up and make sure everything is in order.”

10. Bring to a stop

This phrase means to cause something to come to a stop or to make something stop moving.

  • For example, “The sudden brake brought the car to a stop.”
  • In a discussion about a conflict, someone might say, “We need to bring these hostilities to a stop.”
  • A person might warn, “If you see any suspicious activity, report it immediately and try to bring it to a stop.”

11. Close down

This phrase is often used to describe the act of permanently closing or ceasing operation of a business or organization. It can also refer to ending a specific activity or event.

  • For example, “The company decided to close down its manufacturing plant.”
  • In a conversation about a failed venture, someone might say, “They had to close down the business due to financial difficulties.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team’s poor performance led to the decision to close down the franchise.”

12. Bring to a finish

This phrase means to bring something to an end or to finish a task or project.

  • For instance, “I need to bring this report to a finish before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about a long-term goal, someone might say, “I’m determined to bring this project to a finish.”
  • A teacher might encourage their students by saying, “Let’s work hard to bring this semester to a finish on a high note.”

13. Bring to a termination

This phrase means to bring something to a complete end or to terminate it.

  • For example, “The contract was brought to a termination due to a breach of agreement.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The court decided to bring the trial to a termination.”
  • A manager might discuss the decision to bring a project to a termination by saying, “After careful consideration, we have decided to end the project.”

14. Close the chapter

This phrase means to bring a particular phase or period of time to an end, often with a sense of finality or closure.

  • For instance, “After years of hard work, I’m ready to close the chapter on my academic career.”
  • In a discussion about a past relationship, someone might say, “I finally closed the chapter on that toxic relationship.”
  • A retiree might reflect on their career by saying, “It’s time to close the chapter on my professional life and enjoy retirement.”

15. Draw the curtain

This phrase is often used metaphorically to refer to the act of bringing something to an end or concluding a particular situation or event.

  • For example, “The CEO’s resignation drew the curtain on a turbulent era for the company.”
  • In a discussion about a long-running TV show, someone might say, “The final episode drew the curtain on the series.”
  • A politician might announce their retirement by saying, “After many years of public service, it’s time for me to draw the curtain on my political career.”

16. Put a stop to

This phrase is used to describe the act of stopping or ending something.

  • For example, “The government needs to put a stop to these illegal activities.”
  • A teacher might say, “I had to put a stop to the students’ disruptive behavior in class.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might instruct the team to “put a stop to the opposing team’s scoring streak.”

17. Bring to a standstill

This phrase is used to describe the action of bringing something to a complete stop or causing it to come to a standstill.

  • For instance, “The heavy traffic brought the city to a standstill.”
  • A strike could bring production in a factory to a standstill.
  • A financial crisis might bring the economy to a standstill.
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18. Close the book

This phrase is used to indicate the finality or conclusion of a situation or event.

  • For example, “After years of investigation, the detective finally closed the book on the case.”
  • A person might say, “It’s time to close the book on our past and move forward.”
  • In a business context, a company might decide to close the book on a failing project.

19. Draw the line

This phrase is used to establish a limit or boundary, indicating that a certain behavior or action is unacceptable.

  • For instance, “I’m okay with a little teasing, but making fun of someone’s appearance is where I draw the line.”
  • A parent might say, “I don’t mind you going out with your friends, but I draw the line at staying out past midnight.”
  • In a professional setting, a manager might draw the line at employees arriving late to work.

20. Wrap it up

This phrase is used to suggest or encourage the completion or conclusion of a task, event, or conversation.

  • For example, “We’ve been discussing this issue for hours. Let’s wrap it up and make a decision.”
  • A director might say, “We’re running out of time, so let’s wrap up this scene.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “We’ve covered all the agenda items. Let’s wrap it up and adjourn.”

21. Wind up

To wind up means to finish or conclude something. It is often used when describing the end of a process or event.

  • For example, “We need to wind up this meeting and make a decision.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “Let’s wind up the final details and submit the proposal.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team needs to wind up the game with a strong finish.”

22. Bring to an end

To bring something to an end means to conclude or finish it. It implies taking action to ensure that something stops or reaches its conclusion.

  • For instance, “We need to bring this argument to an end and find a resolution.”
  • In a discussion about a long-running TV show, someone might say, “The producers decided to bring the series to an end after its tenth season.”
  • A manager might say, “Let’s bring this project to an end and move on to the next one.”

23. Conclude

To conclude means to reach a final decision or ending. It indicates the final step or result of a process or event.

  • For example, “After careful consideration, we have concluded that this is the best course of action.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “To conclude my argument, I would like to emphasize the importance of this issue.”
  • A scientist might write, “The study concludes that there is a correlation between these two variables.”

24. Terminate

To terminate means to bring something to an abrupt or sudden end. It implies a deliberate action to stop or cancel something.

  • For instance, “The company decided to terminate the contract with the supplier due to poor performance.”
  • In a discussion about a relationship, someone might say, “I had to terminate the friendship because of a betrayal.”
  • A landlord might say, “If the tenant violates the lease agreement, we have the right to terminate the tenancy.”

25. Cease

To cease means to stop or come to an end. It suggests a cessation of activity or the absence of something.

  • For example, “The rain ceased, and the sun finally came out.”
  • In a discussion about a war, someone might say, “Both sides agreed to cease hostilities and negotiate a peace treaty.”
  • A teacher might say, “Please cease talking and pay attention to the lesson.”

26. Halt

To bring something to a stop or temporarily pause an activity or process. “Halt” is often used to indicate the end of something or to signal a break in progress.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “Halt all production until we resolve this issue.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Halt the advance and regroup.”
  • A teacher might instruct students, “Halt your work and close your textbooks.”

27. Finalize

To complete or bring something to a final stage or state. “Finalize” is often used to indicate the end of a process or the completion of a task.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “Let’s finalize the report and submit it by the end of the day.”
  • A couple planning a wedding might discuss, “We need to finalize the guest list and seating arrangements.”
  • A software developer might comment, “I just need to finalize the code and run some tests before releasing the update.”

28. Cap off

To bring something to a satisfying or successful conclusion. “Cap off” is often used to describe the final act or event that completes a series or sequence.

  • For example, a performer might say, “I’ll cap off the show with my most popular song.”
  • A chef might add, “We’ll cap off the meal with a decadent dessert.”
  • A coach might encourage their team, “Let’s cap off the season with a win in the championship game.”

29. Complete

To bring something to a state of wholeness or finish a task. “Complete” is a straightforward term used to indicate the end or finalization of something.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I need to complete my homework before the deadline.”
  • A project manager might ask, “Have you completed all the tasks assigned to you?”
  • A builder might state, “Once the final touches are complete, the house will be ready for occupancy.”

30. Come to a halt

To suddenly stop or cease movement or progress. “Come to a halt” is a phrase often used to describe a sudden or unexpected end to an activity or process.

  • For example, a driver might say, “The car came to a halt when the engine stalled.”
  • A teacher might remark, “The noisy classroom chatter came to a halt when the principal entered.”
  • A business owner might note, “Sales came to a halt during the economic downturn.”

31. Finish the job

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to complete a task or assignment thoroughly and successfully.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “Make sure you finish the job before the end of the day.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might tell their team, “Let’s give it our all and finish the job on the field.”
  • A friend might motivate another by saying, “You’re almost there! Finish the job and you’ll be proud of yourself.”

32. Knock it off

This phrase is used to tell someone to stop doing a certain action or behavior.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Knock it off with the teasing.”
  • In a workplace setting, a coworker might say to another, “Hey, knock it off with the constant interruptions.”
  • A friend might playfully say, “Knock it off with the jokes already, you’re cracking me up!”

33. Draw to a conclusion

This phrase is used to describe the process of reaching the end or final stage of something.

  • For example, a speaker might say during a presentation, “In conclusion, I would like to draw this topic to a conclusion.”
  • In a debate, one participant might say, “Let’s draw this discussion to a conclusion and summarize our main points.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in an essay, saying, “To draw this argument to a conclusion, it is evident that…”

34. Finale

This term refers to the final part or act of something, often used in the context of a performance or event.

  • For instance, at the end of a concert, the band might perform their biggest hit as the finale.
  • In a TV series, the final episode of a season might be referred to as the season finale.
  • A theater play might have a grand finale where all the characters come together for a final scene.
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35. Conclusion

This word refers to the end or final part of something, often used to summarize or wrap up.

  • For example, in a scientific report, the conclusion section presents the findings and implications of the research.
  • In a story, the conclusion is where all loose ends are tied up and the resolution is reached.
  • A speaker might say, “In conclusion, I would like to thank everyone for their attention and support.”

36. Wrap-up

A term used to describe the final part or conclusion of something. It signifies the end of an event, activity, or process.

  • For example, at the end of a meeting, a team leader might say, “Let’s do a quick wrap-up of the key points discussed.”
  • In a TV show, a host might say, “Stay tuned for the wrap-up after this commercial break.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “We’ll have a wrap-up session next week to review what we’ve learned.”

37. Fin

A French term meaning “end.” It is commonly used as a slang word to indicate the conclusion of something.

  • For instance, at the end of a performance, an actor might say, “That’s a wrap, folks. Fin!”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “And that’s the fin of our discussion.”
  • A writer might end their article by saying, “And with that, we’ve reached the fin of our journey.”

38. Last hurrah

A phrase used to describe a final act or event that marks the end of something. It is often used to denote a celebratory or memorable moment before the end.

  • For example, at the end of a sports season, a team might have a last hurrah party to celebrate their achievements.
  • In a farewell gathering, someone might say, “Let’s make this last hurrah a night to remember.”
  • A retiring employee might have a last hurrah lunch with their colleagues before leaving the company.
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39. Grand finale

A term used to describe the final and most exciting part of a performance, event, or show. It is often associated with a spectacular or impressive conclusion.

  • For instance, a fireworks display might end with a grand finale, featuring a series of synchronized explosions.
  • In a concert, the band might save their most popular song for the grand finale.
  • A TV series might have a grand finale episode that ties up all the loose ends of the story.

40. Curtain call

A theatrical term used to describe the moment when actors come forward to take a bow after a performance. It is often used metaphorically to represent the end or conclusion of something.

  • For example, at the end of a play, the director might announce, “It’s time for the curtain call. Please give a round of applause to the cast.”
  • In a farewell gathering, someone might say, “Let’s have a curtain call for all the good times we’ve had.”
  • A retiring employee might receive a curtain call from their colleagues during a farewell party.

41. The end of the rope

This phrase is used to describe a situation where someone has reached their limit or is no longer able to continue. It can refer to physical or mental exhaustion.

  • For example, “After hours of hiking, I reached the end of my rope and had to turn back.”
  • In a discussion about work stress, someone might say, “I’m nearing the end of my rope with this project.”
  • A person dealing with a difficult relationship might express, “I’ve reached the end of my rope and can’t take it anymore.”

42. The end of the movie

This phrase refers to the final moments of a movie when all loose ends are tied up and the story reaches its resolution. It can also be used figuratively to describe any final or conclusive event.

  • For instance, “The end of the movie revealed a shocking plot twist.”
  • In a film review, a critic might comment, “The end of the movie left me wanting more.”
  • A person discussing their favorite films might say, “The end of the movie always makes me cry.”

43. The end of the book

This phrase refers to the conclusion of a book, where the story reaches its climax and all loose ends are resolved. It can also be used to describe the emotional impact of finishing a particularly engaging book.

  • For example, “The end of the book left me with a sense of satisfaction.”
  • In a book club discussion, someone might ask, “Did the end of the book surprise you?”
  • A reader might say, “I couldn’t put the book down once I reached the end.”

44. The end of the journey

This phrase refers to the point where a journey or travel experience comes to an end. It can also be used metaphorically to describe the completion of a personal or professional endeavor.

  • For instance, “Reaching the end of the journey, I felt a sense of accomplishment.”
  • In a travel blog post, someone might share, “The end of the journey was even more breathtaking than I expected.”
  • A person reflecting on their career might say, “I’m nearing the end of the journey, but I’m proud of everything I’ve accomplished.”

45. The end of the song

This phrase refers to the concluding moments of a song, where the music fades out or the lyrics reach their final lines. It can also be used to describe the emotional impact of a song’s ending.

  • For example, “The end of the song left me feeling nostalgic.”
  • In a music review, a critic might comment, “The end of the song was a powerful crescendo.”
  • A listener might say, “I always get chills at the end of this song.”

46. The end of the game

This phrase refers to the conclusion of a game or competition. It signifies that the game has reached its final point and there are no more moves or actions to be taken.

  • For example, after a player wins a round of chess, they might say, “Checkmate, it’s the end of the game.”
  • In a video game, a character might say, “You’ve reached the final level, it’s the end of the game.”
  • A sports commentator might exclaim, “And with that goal, the team secures victory. It’s the end of the game!”

47. The end of the road

This phrase is used to describe a situation where there are no more options or possibilities for progress. It signifies that one has reached a point where there is no way to continue or move forward.

  • For instance, if someone fails to achieve their goal, they might say, “I’ve come to the end of the road.”
  • In a difficult situation, someone might express, “I feel like I’m at the end of the road with no solutions.”
  • A person discussing a failed relationship might say, “We’ve reached the end of the road, there’s no going back.”