Top 30 Slang For Ensuring – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to ensuring clear communication, using the right slang can make all the difference. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for ensuring that you’re understood and in the know. From everyday conversations to professional settings, these phrases will have you covered in any situation. So, buckle up and get ready to boost your language game with our expertly curated list!

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1. Locking it down

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been secured or finalized successfully.

  • For example, “I’m locking it down with a contract to ensure that the deal goes through.”
  • A person might say, “I’m locking it down by confirming the reservation for the event.”
  • In a discussion about job offers, someone might say, “I’m locking it down with the company by signing the employment agreement.”

2. Sealing the deal

This phrase is used to describe the act of finalizing an agreement or arrangement.

  • For instance, “We sealed the deal by signing the contract and exchanging payment.”
  • A person might say, “I’m confident that we can seal the deal with a handshake.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “Let’s seal the deal by agreeing on the terms and conditions.”

3. Nailing it down

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been successfully completed or achieved.

  • For example, “I nailed it down by finishing the project ahead of schedule.”
  • A person might say, “I’m confident in nailing it down by preparing thoroughly for the presentation.”
  • In a discussion about goals, someone might say, “I’m focused on nailing it down by reaching my target weight.”

4. Making sure

This phrase is used to express the act of ensuring or confirming something.

  • For instance, “I’m making sure that all the details are correct before submitting the report.”
  • A person might say, “I’m making sure that everyone is on the same page before proceeding with the project.”
  • In a conversation about travel plans, someone might say, “I’m making sure that I have all the necessary documents before leaving.”

5. Guaranteeing

This term is used to describe the act of providing a promise or assurance.

  • For example, “I’m guaranteeing that the product will meet your expectations or your money back.”
  • A person might say, “The company is guaranteeing a full refund if the service does not meet your satisfaction.”
  • In a discussion about warranties, someone might say, “The manufacturer is guaranteeing the product against defects for one year.”

6. Covering all bases

This phrase means to make sure that every possible aspect or detail has been considered and addressed. It implies thoroughness and a proactive approach to ensuring success or preventing problems.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “Before we present our proposal, let’s make sure we’re covering all bases and have accounted for any potential issues.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might instruct the team, “On defense, make sure you’re covering all your bases and anticipating the opponent’s moves.”
  • A teacher might remind students, “When studying for the test, make sure you’re covering all the bases by reviewing all the material.”

7. Crossing the T’s and dotting the I’s

This phrase means to pay close attention to details and ensure that everything is correct and in order. It emphasizes the importance of precision and accuracy.

  • For instance, a lawyer might say, “Before submitting the legal documents, make sure you’ve crossed all the T’s and dotted all the I’s.”
  • In a business context, a manager might remind employees, “When preparing the financial report, make sure you’re crossing all the T’s and dotting all the I’s to avoid any errors.”
  • A teacher might advise students, “When writing your essays, don’t forget to cross the T’s and dot the I’s by proofreading for spelling and grammar errors.”

8. Making it happen

This phrase means to take action and ensure that something is accomplished or achieved. It implies determination, resourcefulness, and a proactive approach to achieving a desired outcome.

  • For example, a project leader might say, “We have a tight deadline, but I’m confident we can make it happen if we all work together.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’ve always dreamed of traveling the world, and now I’m finally making it happen.”
  • A coach might motivate the team by saying, “We’re down by 10 points, but if we give it our all, we can make it happen and win the game.”

9. Making certain

This phrase means to take steps to ensure that something is true, accurate, or confirmed. It implies a deliberate effort to eliminate doubt or uncertainty.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “We need to gather more evidence to make certain of the suspect’s guilt.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might order additional tests to “make certain” of a diagnosis before starting treatment.
  • A teacher might ask a student to “make certain” their answer is correct by double-checking their work.
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10. Making it a sure thing

This phrase means to take actions or make arrangements to ensure that something will definitely happen or be successful. It implies confidence and a high level of certainty.

  • For example, a salesperson might say, “If we offer a special discount, we can make it a sure thing that customers will buy our product.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might make strategic substitutions to “make it a sure thing” that the team secures a victory.
  • A student might study diligently to “make it a sure thing” that they pass the exam with flying colors.

11. Making it a done deal

This phrase is used to emphasize that something is guaranteed or certain to happen. It implies that all necessary steps or actions have been taken to ensure a positive outcome.

  • For example, “With our team’s expertise, we’re making it a done deal.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “We’re close to making it a done deal. Just a few more details to iron out.”
  • A person might express confidence by stating, “I have full faith in our plan. We’re making it a done deal.”

12. Making it happen no matter what

This phrase conveys determination and commitment to achieving a goal or making something happen, regardless of any challenges or obstacles that may arise.

  • For instance, “We’re facing difficulties, but we’re making it happen no matter what.”
  • In a discussion about perseverance, someone might share, “No matter how tough the road gets, I believe in making it happen no matter what.”
  • A person might encourage others by saying, “Don’t let anything hold you back. Keep making it happen no matter what.”

13. Making it happen no ifs, ands, or buts

This phrase emphasizes the determination and commitment to achieving a goal without any doubts, hesitations, or excuses. It implies a no-nonsense approach to making something happen.

  • For example, “We need to make this project a success, no ifs, ands, or buts.”
  • In a conversation about dedication, someone might say, “When it comes to my dreams, I’m making it happen no ifs, ands, or buts.”
  • A person might motivate others by stating, “Don’t let any excuses hold you back. Keep making it happen no ifs, ands, or buts.”

14. Making it a reality

This phrase expresses the intent and determination to turn an idea, plan, or dream into a tangible reality. It implies taking the necessary actions and steps to ensure the achievement of a desired outcome.

  • For instance, “We’ve been working hard to make our vision a reality.”
  • In a discussion about goal-setting, someone might share, “I’m focused on making my dreams a reality, no matter how long it takes.”
  • A person might inspire others by stating, “Believe in your dreams and work towards making them a reality.”

15. Making it a sure bet

This phrase suggests that something is highly likely to happen or succeed. It conveys confidence and certainty in achieving a desired result.

  • For example, “With our strategy, we’re making it a sure bet.”
  • In a conversation about probabilities, someone might say, “I’m making it a sure bet that I’ll achieve my goals.”
  • A person might express optimism by stating, “Despite the challenges, I believe in making it a sure bet.”

16. Locking it in

This phrase is used to indicate that something has been firmly decided or confirmed and is now in a state of certainty or completion.

  • For example, “We’re locking in our travel plans for the vacation.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Let’s lock in the deal with the client.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “We need to lock in our game plan for the upcoming match.”

17. Putting it in stone

This slang phrase means to make a decision or plan that cannot be altered or reversed.

  • For instance, “After much discussion, we’re putting our decision in stone.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’m putting my career goals in stone and committing to them.”
  • A project manager might declare, “We’re putting the project timeline in stone to ensure everyone is on the same page.”

18. Making it stick

This phrase is used to convey the idea of making sure that a plan or action achieves its desired outcome and is not easily forgotten or dismissed.

  • For example, “We need to make our marketing campaign stick in people’s minds.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might say, “Focus on the fundamentals and make your shots stick.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Believe in your vision and make it stick through determination and hard work.”

19. Setting it in motion

This expression means to begin or launch a process or action, often with the intention of achieving a specific goal or outcome.

  • For instance, “Once we have the necessary resources, we’ll set our plan in motion.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We’re setting the new project in motion and assigning tasks to team members.”
  • A coordinator might announce, “Let’s set the event logistics in motion to ensure a smooth execution.”

20. Buttoning it up

This slang phrase is used to indicate the act of finishing or concluding a task or project, often with attention to detail and ensuring that everything is in order.

  • For example, “We’re buttoning up the final details before the product launch.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might say, “I just need to button up my outfit before heading out.”
  • A project manager might instruct their team, “Let’s button up the report and send it to the client for review.”

21. Keeping it in check

This phrase means to ensure that everything is being monitored and controlled properly.

  • For example, a manager might say, “I’m keeping it in check to make sure the project stays on schedule.”
  • In a conversation about personal finances, someone might mention, “I’m keeping my spending in check to save more money.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Keep your behavior in check during the field trip.”

22. Verifying

This term refers to the act of confirming or checking the accuracy or validity of something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m verifying the information before sharing it with others.”
  • In a discussion about identity theft, someone might mention, “Always verify the legitimacy of a website before entering personal information.”
  • A software developer might say, “The program has a built-in feature for verifying user credentials.”

23. Guaranteeing it

This phrase means to make a promise or assurance that something will happen or be done.

  • For example, a salesperson might say, “I’m guaranteeing that this product will meet your expectations.”
  • In a conversation about a job offer, someone might say, “The company is guaranteeing a salary increase after six months.”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “We guarantee that our food is made with fresh ingredients.”

24. Lock it down

This phrase means to secure or make something definite and unchangeable.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to lock down my travel plans for the holidays.”
  • In a discussion about a business deal, someone might mention, “We need to lock down the terms of the contract before moving forward.”
  • A coach might tell their team, “Let’s lock down our defense and prevent any more goals.”

25. Seal the deal

This phrase means to finalize an agreement or arrangement to ensure its completion.

  • For example, a negotiator might say, “I sealed the deal with the client by offering a special discount.”
  • In a conversation about buying a house, someone might mention, “We’re meeting with the seller tomorrow to seal the deal.”
  • A businessperson might say, “A strong sales pitch can help seal the deal and win over potential customers.”

26. Confirm and reconfirm

This phrase emphasizes the importance of verifying information or details multiple times to ensure accuracy and certainty.

  • For example, before sending an important email, one might say, “I need to confirm and reconfirm the recipient’s email address.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might suggest, “Let’s confirm and reconfirm the agenda to avoid any misunderstandings.”
  • When organizing an event, a planner might remind their team, “We need to confirm and reconfirm all the details with the vendors and participants.”

27. Lock and load

Originally a military term, this phrase is used to indicate that someone is readying themselves for action or preparing for a task.

  • For instance, before starting a presentation, someone might say, “Okay, everyone, lock and load your slides.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might shout, “Lock and load, team! It’s time to give it your all.”
  • When getting ready for a road trip, a driver might announce, “Lock and load, everyone! We’re leaving in 10 minutes.”

28. Have a fail-safe

This phrase refers to having a precautionary measure or alternative plan in place to prevent or mitigate the negative consequences of a potential failure.

  • For example, when discussing a project, someone might suggest, “We should have a fail-safe in case the main system crashes.”
  • In a technological context, a programmer might say, “Our software has a fail-safe mechanism to prevent data loss.”
  • When organizing an outdoor event, a planner might ensure there is a fail-safe option in case of bad weather.
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29. Make it foolproof

This phrase means to design or create something in a way that eliminates the possibility of mistakes or errors, making it easy for anyone to use or understand.

  • For instance, when explaining a complex process, someone might say, “Let’s break it down and make it foolproof.”
  • In a software development context, a programmer might strive to “make the user interface foolproof to minimize user errors.”
  • When teaching a new skill, an instructor might emphasize, “We need to make the instructions foolproof so that anyone can follow them.”

30. Leave no room for error

This phrase emphasizes the importance of ensuring that there are no chances for mistakes or errors to occur.

  • For example, when discussing a critical task, someone might say, “We need to leave no room for error in this operation.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might instruct their team, “During surgery, we must leave no room for error.”
  • When preparing for a competition, a coach might remind their athletes, “In order to win, we must leave no room for error in our performance.”