Top 55 Slang For Numerous – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing quantity in a cool and casual way, sometimes regular words just won’t cut it. That’s where slang for numerous comes in handy. Whether you’re trying to sound hip or just want to stay in the loop, our team has rounded up the trendiest and most useful slang terms for describing a large number of things. Get ready to upgrade your vocabulary and impress your friends with these fresh and fun expressions!

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1. Tons

This term refers to a large or significant number of something. It is often used to emphasize abundance or excess.

  • For example, “I have tons of homework to do tonight.”
  • A person might say, “There are tons of restaurants in this city, it’s hard to choose.”
  • In a conversation about a successful event, someone might comment, “We had tons of people show up!”

2. Loads

This slang term is used to describe a significant or substantial quantity of something. It is often used to convey a sense of abundance or excess.

  • For instance, “I have loads of laundry to do.”
  • A person might say, “There are loads of books on that subject, it’s overwhelming.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded party, someone might comment, “There were loads of people, it was hard to move!”

3. Countless

This word is used to describe a number that is too large or numerous to be counted or determined. It emphasizes the idea of an infinite or immeasurable quantity.

  • For example, “There are countless stars in the night sky.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve had countless conversations with him, but I still don’t understand.”
  • In a discussion about a popular tourist destination, someone might comment, “There are countless attractions to visit.”

4. Multitude

This term refers to a large number or variety of something. It can be used to describe a diverse or extensive range of options or choices.

  • For instance, “There is a multitude of colors to choose from.”
  • A person might say, “There are a multitude of factors to consider before making a decision.”
  • In a conversation about a successful business, someone might comment, “They offer a multitude of products and services.”

5. Myriad

This word is used to describe an extremely large or countless number of something. It emphasizes the idea of a vast or infinite quantity.

  • For example, “There are myriad opportunities for growth in this industry.”
  • A person might say, “He has a myriad of talents and skills.”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might comment, “There are myriad factors to consider when analyzing the problem.”

6. Copious

This word is used to describe a large amount or quantity of something. It suggests an abundance or excess.

  • For example, “The buffet had a copious amount of food to choose from.”
  • A person might say, “She took copious notes during the lecture.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might comment, “The author used copious amounts of descriptive language to paint a vivid picture.”

7. Abundant

This word is used to describe something that is present in large quantities or numbers. It implies a plentiful or ample supply.

  • For instance, “The garden was filled with abundant flowers.”
  • A person might say, “We have an abundant supply of fresh produce.”
  • In a conversation about wildlife, someone might mention, “The region is known for its abundant bird population.”

8. A slew of

This phrase is used to indicate a large, undefined number of something. It suggests a multitude or a great quantity.

  • For example, “The store received a slew of complaints about their customer service.”
  • A person might say, “I have a slew of tasks to complete before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about movies, someone might comment, “The director has made a slew of successful films.”

9. A plethora of

This phrase is used to describe an abundance or excess of something. It suggests a vast or overwhelming quantity.

  • For instance, “The store offers a plethora of options for shoppers.”
  • A person might say, “The conference had a plethora of informative sessions.”
  • In a conversation about books, someone might mention, “The library has a plethora of novels to choose from.”

10. A boatload of

This phrase is used to describe a significant or substantial amount of something. It implies a large or impressive number.

  • For example, “The team scored a boatload of goals in the game.”
  • A person might say, “I have a boatload of work to do before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about desserts, someone might comment, “The bakery has a boatload of delicious treats to try.”

11. A myriad of

This phrase is used to describe a large, indefinite number of something. It emphasizes the abundance or variety of the subject.

  • For example, “There are a myriad of options to choose from at the buffet.”
  • In a discussion about books, one might say, “She has a myriad of novels in her personal library.”
  • A traveler might describe a city by saying, “There’s a myriad of things to do and see in New York.”

12. A bunch of

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or group of something. It implies a casual or informal tone.

  • For instance, “I have a bunch of books on my shelf that I haven’t read yet.”
  • In a conversation about groceries, one might say, “I need to buy a bunch of bananas.”
  • A person might describe a party by saying, “There were a bunch of people at the event.”

13. A stack of

This phrase is used to describe a significant quantity or number of something. It often implies a sense of organization or neatness.

  • For example, “There’s a stack of paperwork on my desk that needs to be completed.”
  • In a discussion about money, one might say, “He won a stack of cash in the poker game.”
  • A person might describe a library by saying, “They have a stack of books on every topic imaginable.”

14. A heap of

This phrase is used to describe an abundance or large amount of something. It implies a sense of disorder or messiness.

  • For instance, “There’s a heap of laundry that needs to be washed.”
  • In a conversation about food, one might say, “He piled a heap of mashed potatoes on his plate.”
  • A person might describe a messy room by saying, “There’s a heap of clothes on the floor.”

15. A ton of

This phrase is used to describe a significant quantity or volume of something. It emphasizes the magnitude or weight of the subject.

  • For example, “I have a ton of work to do before the deadline.”
  • In a discussion about gifts, one might say, “She received a ton of presents for her birthday.”
  • A person might describe a traffic jam by saying, “There’s a ton of cars on the highway.”

16. A load of

This phrase is used to describe a large amount or number of something.

  • For example, “There’s a load of laundry that needs to be done.”
  • In a conversation about work, someone might say, “I have a load of emails to respond to.”
  • A person discussing a party might say, “There will be a load of people there.”

17. A mountain of

This phrase is used to describe a large and overwhelming amount or number of something.

  • For instance, “I have a mountain of paperwork to do.”
  • In a discussion about tasks, someone might say, “I have a mountain of chores to tackle this weekend.”
  • A person talking about food might say, “The buffet had a mountain of options to choose from.”

18. A swarm of

This phrase is used to describe a large number of things or people moving together in a group.

  • For example, “We saw a swarm of bees flying around the garden.”
  • In a conversation about insects, someone might say, “There was a swarm of mosquitoes near the lake.”
  • A person discussing a protest might say, “A swarm of people marched through the streets.”

19. A horde of

This phrase is used to describe a large and disorderly group of people or things.

  • For instance, “There was a horde of shoppers rushing into the store on Black Friday.”
  • In a discussion about zombies, someone might say, “A horde of zombies approached the survivors.”
  • A person talking about fans might say, “The concert attracted a horde of screaming fans.”

20. A flock of

This phrase is used to describe a large number of birds or people moving together as a group.

  • For example, “We saw a flock of seagulls flying over the beach.”
  • In a conversation about sheep, someone might say, “There was a flock of sheep grazing in the field.”
  • A person discussing tourists might say, “A flock of tourists gathered around the famous landmark.”

21. A multitude of

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or number of something. It emphasizes the vastness or abundance of the subject.

  • For example, “The store offers a multitude of options for shoppers.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded event, one might say, “There was a multitude of people at the concert.”
  • A writer might use the phrase to describe a complex issue, such as, “The problem has a multitude of factors that need to be considered.”

22. A cluster of

This term is used to describe a small gathering or collection of things or people that are closely grouped together.

  • For instance, “There was a cluster of trees at the edge of the field.”
  • In a discussion about stars, one might say, “The constellation is made up of a cluster of stars.”
  • A biologist might describe a group of cells as, “A cluster of cells forming a tissue.”

23. A collection of

This phrase is used to describe a group or assemblage of things that are brought together or accumulated.

  • For example, “The museum has a collection of ancient artifacts.”
  • In a discussion about books, one might say, “She has a collection of classic novels.”
  • A person talking about hobbies might mention, “I have a collection of stamps from around the world.”

24. A batch of

This term is used to describe a quantity of things or items that are processed or produced together.

  • For instance, “The bakery just baked a fresh batch of cookies.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, one might say, “I made a batch of homemade pasta sauce.”
  • A person talking about manufacturing might mention, “The factory produces a batch of products every hour.”

25. A bundle of

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or number of things that are tied or wrapped together.

  • For example, “She carried a bundle of clothes on her back.”
  • In a discussion about money, one might say, “He earned a bundle of cash from his business.”
  • A person talking about nerves might say, “I was a bundle of nerves before the big presentation.”

26. A bounty of

This phrase is used to describe a plentiful or abundant supply of something.

  • For example, “The farmer’s market had a bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables.”
  • A person might say, “The buffet offers a bounty of delicious food options.”
  • In a discussion about books, someone might comment, “The library has a bounty of great reads for all ages.”

27. A wealth of

This phrase is used to describe a plentiful or extensive amount of something.

  • For instance, “The museum has a wealth of historical artifacts.”
  • A person might say, “The internet provides a wealth of information on any topic.”
  • In a conversation about resources, someone might mention, “The city has a wealth of parks and recreational areas.”

28. A cornucopia of

This phrase is used to describe a wide range or diverse collection of something.

  • For example, “The buffet offered a cornucopia of delicious dishes from around the world.”
  • A person might say, “The store has a cornucopia of options for home decor.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might comment, “The music festival features a cornucopia of different genres and artists.”

29. A treasure trove of

This phrase is used to describe a hidden or discovered collection of valuable or interesting items.

  • For instance, “The attic was a treasure trove of vintage clothing and accessories.”
  • A person might say, “The museum’s archives are a treasure trove of historical documents.”
  • In a conversation about research, someone might mention, “The library’s database is a treasure trove of scholarly articles and resources.”

30. A hoard of

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or stash of something that is often hidden or kept secret.

  • For example, “The dragon guarded a hoard of gold and jewels in its lair.”
  • A person might say, “The survivalist had a hoard of food and supplies in their bunker.”
  • In a discussion about collectibles, someone might comment, “The collector had a hoard of rare comic books in mint condition.”

31. Gazillion

This slang term is used to exaggerate or emphasize a large quantity or amount. It is often used humorously or sarcastically.

  • For example, “I have a gazillion things to do today!”
  • Someone might say, “There were a gazillion people at the concert last night.”
  • Another might exclaim, “I’ve got a gazillion ideas for our project!”

32. Boatload

This slang term refers to a significant or overwhelming amount of something. It is often used to emphasize a large quantity.

  • For instance, “I have a boatload of homework to finish.”
  • Someone might say, “We made a boatload of money from the sale.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There’s a boatload of food at the buffet!”

33. Heap

This slang term is used to describe a large quantity or amount of something. It is a casual and informal way to convey a sense of abundance.

  • For example, “I have a heap of laundry to do.”
  • Someone might say, “We received a heap of applications for the job.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There’s a heap of presents under the Christmas tree!”

34. Masses

This slang term refers to a large group or quantity of people or things. It is often used to describe a significant or overwhelming number.

  • For instance, “The concert attracted masses of fans.”
  • Someone might say, “We have masses of paperwork to complete.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There are masses of books in the library!”

35. Scads

This slang term is used to describe a significant or abundant number or quantity of something. It is often used to emphasize a large amount.

  • For example, “I have scads of homework to finish.”
  • Someone might say, “We received scads of compliments on our performance.”
  • Another might exclaim, “There are scads of options to choose from!”

36. Slew

This term is used to describe a large and unspecified number or quantity of something.

  • For example, “I have a slew of projects to complete before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about movies, someone might say, “There were a slew of action films released this summer.”
  • A person discussing their workload might say, “I have a slew of emails to respond to today.”

37. Zillion

This word is used to emphasize a very large and unspecified number, often to exaggerate.

  • For instance, “I have a zillion things to do before the party.”
  • In a discussion about a crowded event, someone might say, “There were a zillion people at the concert.”
  • A person expressing frustration might say, “I’ve asked her a zillion times to clean up after herself.”

38. A plethora

This phrase is used to describe a large or excessive amount of something.

  • For example, “The store offers a plethora of options for shoppers.”
  • In a conversation about food, someone might say, “The buffet had a plethora of delicious dishes.”
  • A person discussing book options might say, “The library has a plethora of books to choose from.”

39. A slew

Similar to “slew,” this phrase is used to describe a large and unspecified number or quantity of something.

  • For instance, “She has a slew of excuses for being late.”
  • In a discussion about job applicants, someone might say, “We received a slew of resumes for the position.”
  • A person describing their shopping trip might say, “I bought a slew of new clothes at the mall.”

40. A myriad

This term is used to describe an indefinitely large number or variety.

  • For example, “There are a myriad of options to choose from.”
  • In a conversation about stars in the sky, someone might say, “There are a myriad of stars visible on a clear night.”
  • A person discussing career possibilities might say, “There are a myriad of job opportunities in the tech industry.”

41. Multitudinous

This word is used to describe a large quantity or multitude of something.

  • For example, “The multitudinous stars filled the night sky.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “There are multitudinous ways to solve this problem.”
  • A person might describe a crowded event as “multitudinous” by saying,“multitudinous” by saying, “The concert was attended by a multitudinous crowd.”

42. A gazillion

This slang term is used to exaggerate the idea of a large or countless number.

  • For instance, “I have a gazillion things to do today.”
  • In a conversation about money, someone might say, “He’s worth a gazillion dollars.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a never-ending task by saying, “I’ve been working on this project for a gazillion hours.”

43. A zillion

Similar to “gazillion,” this slang term is used to exaggerate the idea of a large or countless number.

  • For example, “I’ve seen that movie a zillion times.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “There are a zillion ways to style your hair.”
  • A person might exaggerate the number of people attending an event by saying, “There will be a zillion people at the party.”

44. A bajillion

This slang term is another way to exaggerate the idea of a large or countless number.

  • For instance, “I’ve told you a bajillion times to clean your room.”
  • In a conversation about possibilities, someone might say, “There are a bajillion things we could do this weekend.”
  • A person might exaggerate the number of items in a collection by saying, “I have a bajillion books on my shelf.”

45. A jillion

Similar to the previous terms, “jillion” is used to exaggerate the idea of a large or countless number.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for a jillion years.”
  • In a discussion about options, someone might say, “There are a jillion different flavors to choose from.”
  • A person might exaggerate the number of tasks they have to complete by saying, “I have a jillion things on my to-do list.”

46. A bunch

This phrase is used to describe a large number or amount of something. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I have a bunch of books to read before the end of the semester.”
  • Someone might say, “There are a bunch of people waiting in line for the concert.”
  • A person describing a messy room might say, “There’s a bunch of clothes and shoes all over the floor.”

47. A heap

This term is used to describe a large quantity or collection of something. It can be used in both a literal and figurative sense.

  • For instance, “There’s a heap of laundry that needs to be done.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a heap of work to finish before the deadline.”
  • A person describing a messy desk might say, “There’s a heap of papers and folders scattered everywhere.”

48. A mass

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or amount of something. It implies a sense of abundance or excess.

  • For example, “There’s a mass of people at the concert.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a mass of paperwork to sort through.”
  • A person describing a crowded room might say, “There’s a mass of bodies in here.”

49. A stack

This term is used to describe a large quantity or pile of something. It can be used in both a literal and figurative sense.

  • For instance, “There’s a stack of dishes in the sink.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a stack of papers on my desk that need to be filed.”
  • A person describing a busy schedule might say, “I have a stack of meetings and appointments today.”

50. A mountain

This phrase is used to describe a large quantity or number of something. It suggests a significant amount or a high level of abundance.

  • For example, “There’s a mountain of laundry that needs to be washed.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a mountain of emails to respond to.”
  • A person describing a long to-do list might say, “I have a mountain of tasks to complete today.”

51. A load

This phrase is used to describe a significant quantity or volume of something.

  • For example, “I have a load of laundry to do today.”
  • A person might say, “I have a load of work to finish before the deadline.”
  • In a conversation about groceries, someone might mention, “I bought a load of snacks for the party.”

52. A swarm

This term is often used to describe a large number of people or things that are moving or acting together.

  • For instance, “There was a swarm of bees outside my window.”
  • In a discussion about protesters, someone might say, “A swarm of people gathered in the streets to demand change.”
  • A person might describe a crowded event by saying, “The concert was packed with a swarm of enthusiastic fans.”

53. A flock

This word is typically used to describe a large number of birds or sheep that are moving or staying together.

  • For example, “A flock of seagulls flew overhead.”
  • In a conversation about a music festival, someone might say, “A flock of music lovers gathered to enjoy their favorite bands.”
  • A person might describe a crowded park by saying, “The park was filled with a flock of families enjoying the sunshine.”

54. A pack

This term is often used to describe a group of animals or a collection of items that are bundled or grouped together.

  • For instance, “A pack of wolves howled in the distance.”
  • In a discussion about cigarettes, someone might say, “He always has a pack of cigarettes in his pocket.”
  • A person might describe a group of friends by saying, “We’re a tight-knit pack who always have each other’s backs.”

55. A cluster

This word is used to describe a number of things that are grouped or gathered closely together.

  • For example, “A cluster of stars twinkled in the night sky.”
  • In a conversation about grapes, someone might say, “The vineyard had a cluster of ripe grapes ready for harvest.”
  • A person might describe a crowded city street by saying, “There was a cluster of people waiting at the bus stop.”
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