Top 71 Slang For Exaggerated – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to emphasizing a point or story, sometimes a little exaggeration can go a long way. In this listicle, we’ve rounded up the top slang terms that people use to add a touch of flair and drama to their tales. Get ready to dive into the world of colorful language and learn how to make your anecdotes pop with these fun expressions!

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1. Over the top

This phrase is used to describe something that is exaggerated, extravagant, or taken to an extreme level.

  • For example, “The decorations at the party were completely over the top.”
  • A person might say, “His reaction to the news was way over the top.”
  • In a review of a movie, one might write, “The action sequences were so over the top that it was hard to take them seriously.”

2. Blown out of proportion

This phrase is used when something is made to seem more important or significant than it actually is.

  • For instance, “The media blew the story out of proportion.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t worry, it’s just a minor issue. You’re blowing it out of proportion.”
  • In a discussion about a disagreement, one might comment, “Both sides are blowing things out of proportion and not seeing the bigger picture.”

3. Larger than life

This phrase is used to describe someone or something that is extraordinary, grand, or remarkable.

  • For example, “He had a larger than life personality.”
  • A person might say, “Her performance on stage was larger than life.”
  • In a description of a character in a book, one might write, “The protagonist was a larger than life figure, capturing the attention of everyone around them.”

4. Hyperbolized

This term is used to describe the act of making something seem more extreme or dramatic than it actually is.

  • For instance, “The speaker hyperbolized the effects of climate change.”
  • A person might say, “His story was clearly hyperbolized for dramatic effect.”
  • In a discussion about a sports performance, one might comment, “The announcer tends to hyperbolize the players’ skills.”

5. Amped up

This phrase is used to describe something that has been heightened or made more intense.

  • For example, “The crowd was amped up for the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I need some coffee to get amped up for the meeting.”
  • In a description of a party, one might write, “The music was loud and the atmosphere was amped up with excitement.”

6. Dramatized

This term refers to something that has been exaggerated or made more dramatic than it actually is. It is often used to describe a story, event, or situation that has been embellished for effect.

  • For example, “She really dramatized that argument with her friend.”
  • In a review of a movie, one might say, “The plot felt a bit dramatized and unrealistic.”
  • Someone might comment on a news article, “The headline is a bit dramatized. The situation wasn’t as dire as they make it seem.”

7. Embellished

When something is embellished, it means that additional details or elements have been added to make it more interesting or impressive. This term is often used to describe stories, descriptions, or accounts that have been exaggerated for effect.

  • For instance, “He embellished his fishing story to make it sound more exciting.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s achievements, one might say, “I think he embellished his resume a bit.”
  • A person might comment on a piece of artwork, “The artist really embellished the details to create a more captivating image.”

8. Magnified

To magnify something is to make it appear larger, greater, or more intense than it actually is. In slang, it can refer to exaggerating or amplifying a situation or emotion for effect.

  • For example, “She really magnified her disappointment over not getting the job.”
  • In a discussion about a sports game, one might say, “The media tends to magnify the importance of certain players.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “The filter really magnified the colors in that photo.”

9. Inflated

When something is inflated, it means that it has been exaggerated or made to seem larger or more important than it actually is. This term is often used to describe a situation, issue, or statement that has been blown out of proportion.

  • For instance, “The media really inflated that celebrity scandal.”
  • In a discussion about a political controversy, one might say, “Both sides are inflating the issue to gain support.”
  • A person might comment on a rumor, “Don’t believe everything you hear. It’s likely inflated.”

10. Aggrandized

To aggrandize something is to make it appear greater or more impressive than it actually is. This term is often used to describe a person, event, or idea that has been excessively praised or hyped up.

  • For example, “The marketing team really aggrandized the product in their advertisements.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity, one might say, “Their talent is often aggrandized by the media.”
  • A person might comment on a movie trailer, “I think the preview aggrandizes the film. It’s not as good as it looks.”

11. Hyped up

This term refers to something that has been exaggerated or made to seem more exciting or important than it actually is. It often implies that the hype is excessive or unwarranted.

  • For example, “The movie was hyped up as the best of the year, but it ended up being disappointing.”
  • In a discussion about a new product, someone might say, “Don’t believe all the hype, it’s just a hyped up version of something that already exists.”
  • A person might describe a party as “hyped up” if they feel it was over-advertised and didn’t live up to expectations.

12. Elaborated

To elaborate means to provide more details or information about something. When used as slang for exaggerated, it suggests that the details or information being provided are excessive or unnecessary.

  • For instance, “He always elaborates on his stories, adding unnecessary details.”
  • In a conversation about a rumor, someone might say, “The story has been elaborated upon so much that it’s hard to distinguish fact from fiction.”
  • A person might describe a friend’s excuse as “elaborated” if they feel it’s overly complicated and exaggerated.

13. Intensified

To intensify means to make something stronger, more extreme, or more intense. When used as slang for exaggerated, it implies that something has been made to seem more extreme or intense than it actually is.

  • For example, “The media often intensifies the impact of a minor event.”
  • In a discussion about a sports game, someone might say, “The commentator’s enthusiasm intensified the excitement of the match.”
  • A person might describe a reaction as “intensified” if they feel it’s overly dramatic or exaggerated.

14. Enlarged

To enlarge means to make something bigger or increase its size. When used as slang for exaggerated, it suggests that something has been made to seem larger or more significant than it actually is.

  • For instance, “The rumor has been enlarged to the point where it’s taken on a life of its own.”
  • In a conversation about a problem, someone might say, “Don’t let your worries become enlarged in your mind.”
  • A person might describe a friend’s reaction as “enlarged” if they feel it’s blown out of proportion or exaggerated.

15. Amplified

To amplify means to make something louder, stronger, or more powerful. When used as slang for exaggerated, it implies that something has been made to seem more intense or extreme than it actually is.

  • For example, “The politician’s speech was amplified by the media to create a sense of urgency.”
  • In a discussion about a performance, someone might say, “The lighting and music amplified the emotional impact of the scene.”
  • A person might describe a reaction as “amplified” if they feel it’s overly dramatic or exaggerated.

16. Fanciful

This word is used to describe something that is not based on reality or is highly imaginative. It often implies that the thing being described is exaggerated or embellished.

  • For example, “She told a fanciful story about her encounter with a unicorn.”
  • When discussing a movie plot, someone might say, “The storyline was a bit fanciful and hard to believe.”
  • A person describing a work of art might comment, “The artist’s use of color created a fanciful and dreamlike atmosphere.”

17. Sensationalized

This term refers to presenting information or events in a way that is designed to provoke strong reactions or interest. It often involves exaggerating certain aspects or using dramatic language to make something seem more exciting or shocking than it actually is.

  • For instance, “The news article sensationalized the crime, making it seem much more dangerous than it actually was.”
  • A person criticizing a tabloid might say, “They always sensationalize celebrity gossip to sell more magazines.”
  • When discussing a movie, someone might comment, “The film was heavily sensationalized to appeal to a wider audience.”

18. Overblown

This word describes something that is inflated or exaggerated, often to the point of being excessive or overdone. It suggests that the thing being described is blown out of proportion or larger than necessary.

  • For example, “The politician’s promises were overblown and unrealistic.”
  • When discussing a news headline, someone might say, “The article’s title was overblown and didn’t accurately reflect the content.”
  • A person critiquing a performance might comment, “The actor’s exaggerated gestures were a bit overblown and took away from the authenticity of the character.”

19. Embiggened

This term, coined by the television show The Simpsons, means to make something bigger or to exaggerate its importance or significance. It is often used humorously or ironically to describe situations or actions that are blown out of proportion.

  • For instance, “He embiggened his resume to make himself seem more qualified for the job.”
  • When discussing a social media post, someone might comment, “She really embiggened her vacation photos to make it seem like she had a more luxurious trip.”
  • A person jokingly describing a meal might say, “The portion sizes at that restaurant are always embiggened to the point of absurdity.”

20. Overemphasized

This word describes something that has been given excessive attention or importance, often to the point of exaggeration. It suggests that the thing being described is emphasized more than necessary or is blown out of proportion.

  • For example, “The coach overemphasized the importance of winning, putting too much pressure on the team.”
  • When discussing a historical event, someone might say, “The significance of that event is often overemphasized in textbooks.”
  • A person critiquing a presentation might comment, “The speaker overemphasized certain points and neglected others, leading to a skewed perspective.”

21. Overstated

When something is exaggerated or made to seem more important or significant than it actually is. It implies that the statement or claim is not accurate or truthful.

  • For example, “The politician’s promises were clearly overstated during the campaign.”
  • In a discussion about a movie’s success, someone might say, “The box office numbers are often overstated to create buzz.”
  • A person might comment on a news article, “The headline seems a bit overstated compared to the actual content of the article.”

22. Excessive

Refers to something that is beyond what is considered normal, appropriate, or necessary. It suggests that there is an abundance or overabundance of something.

  • For instance, “The prices at that restaurant are excessive for the portion sizes.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s spending habits, someone might say, “She has an excessive amount of shoes.”
  • A person might comment on a party, “The music was so loud, it was excessive and overwhelming.”

23. Outrageous

Describes something that is extremely unconventional, shocking, or beyond what is considered acceptable or reasonable. It often implies a sense of disbelief or astonishment.

  • For example, “The price of that designer handbag is outrageous!”
  • In a discussion about a prank, someone might say, “That was an outrageous joke you pulled on your friend.”
  • A person might comment on a news headline, “The politician’s statement was outrageous and offensive.”

24. Outlandish

Refers to something that is peculiar, unconventional, or strange in a way that is not easily explained or understood. It suggests that the thing or idea is unusual or out of the ordinary.

  • For instance, “Her fashion sense is always outlandish and eye-catching.”
  • In a conversation about a new invention, someone might say, “The concept is quite outlandish, but it could revolutionize the industry.”
  • A person might comment on a piece of artwork, “The sculpture is truly outlandish and thought-provoking.”

25. Outsize

Describes something that is larger than what is considered normal or expected. It implies that the size or scale of the object or concept is significantly larger than average.

  • For example, “She bought an outsize teddy bear for her child.”
  • In a discussion about a company’s profits, someone might say, “The CEO received an outsize bonus compared to the rest of the employees.”
  • A person might comment on a sports team’s victory, “Their margin of victory was outsize, dominating the competition.”

26. Overdone

This word is used to describe something that is done to an extreme or excessive degree. It implies that the action or behavior is over-the-top or exaggerated.

  • For example, “Her makeup is completely overdone for a casual lunch.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might say, “The chef’s use of spices was a bit overdone.”
  • A person critiquing a movie might comment, “The special effects were so overdone that it took away from the story.”

27. Overwrought

This word is used to describe someone who is excessively emotional or agitated. It implies that the person is overly dramatic or worked up about something.

  • For instance, “She became overwrought with emotion when she received the award.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “He tends to get overwrought over small disagreements.”
  • A person describing a movie might say, “The actress’s performance was a bit overwrought and melodramatic.”

28. Overplayed

This word is used to describe something that is performed or portrayed in an exaggerated or excessive manner. It implies that the performance or portrayal is lacking subtlety or nuance.

  • For example, “The actor overplayed the comedic scene and it came across as forced.”
  • In a discussion about sports, someone might say, “The player’s injury was overplayed by the media.”
  • A person critiquing a musical performance might comment, “The pianist overplayed the dynamics and it became distracting.”

29. Overexaggerated

This word is used to describe something that is exaggerated to an extreme or excessive degree. It implies that the exaggeration is beyond what is necessary or reasonable.

  • For instance, “His stories are always overexaggerated to make them more interesting.”
  • In a discussion about rumors, someone might say, “The gossip about her is completely overexaggerated.”
  • A person critiquing a painting might comment, “The artist’s use of color is overexaggerated and unrealistic.”

30. Overemotional

This word is used to describe someone who is excessively emotional or sensitive. It implies that the person’s emotions are heightened or intense beyond what is considered normal or reasonable.

  • For example, “She tends to become overemotional during sad movies.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “He becomes overemotional during arguments and it makes it difficult to communicate.”
  • A person describing a book might comment, “The author’s writing style is overemotional and melodramatic.”

31. Overacted

This term refers to the act of performing in an exaggerated or theatrical manner, often in the context of acting in a play, movie, or television show.

  • For example, a theater critic might say, “The actor’s performance was overacted and lacked subtlety.”
  • In a discussion about a film, someone might comment, “The overacted scenes were a distraction from the story.”
  • A viewer might criticize a TV show by saying, “The characters’ overacted reactions were unrealistic.”

32. Overreacted

To react in an exaggerated or extreme way to a situation, often with unnecessary drama or emotion.

  • For instance, if someone spills a drink and someone else starts yelling and crying, they are overreacting.
  • In a conversation about a minor inconvenience, someone might say, “Don’t overreact, it’s not a big deal.”
  • A person might apologize by saying, “I’m sorry I overreacted earlier. I was just really stressed.”

33. Overstressed

This term describes a state of being excessively or excessively stressed, often due to a heavy workload, high expectations, or other pressures.

  • For example, a student might say, “I’m so overstressed with all these exams.”
  • In a discussion about work, someone might comment, “The employees are overstressed and it’s affecting their productivity.”
  • A person might seek advice by saying, “I need help managing my overstressed life.”

34. Overhyped

To build up excessive excitement or anticipation for something, often through marketing or media attention, that doesn’t live up to the hype.

  • For instance, if a movie is heavily promoted as the best film of the year but turns out to be disappointing, it was overhyped.
  • In a conversation about a new product, someone might say, “I think it’s overhyped. The reviews aren’t that great.”
  • A person might express skepticism by saying, “I’ve learned not to get too excited about overhyped events.”

35. Overinflated

This term refers to something that is exaggerated or made to seem more important or valuable than it actually is.

  • For example, in a discussion about the housing market, someone might say, “The prices are overinflated and not sustainable.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity’s ego, someone might comment, “Their sense of self-importance is overinflated.”
  • A person might criticize a news article by saying, “The author’s claims are overinflated and not supported by evidence.”

36. Overestimated

This term refers to something that has been exaggerated or given more importance than it deserves. It implies that the value, worth, or significance of something has been overemphasized.

  • For example, someone might say, “The importance of that meeting was overestimated. It didn’t really accomplish much.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team’s chances of winning, one might argue, “Their potential is being overestimated. They won’t perform as well as people think.”
  • A critic might review a movie and comment, “The film was overestimated by the hype. It didn’t live up to expectations.”

37. Overoptimistic

This term describes someone who has an excessively positive or hopeful outlook, often to the point of being unrealistic or overly idealistic.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Don’t be overoptimistic about the outcome. It’s important to be realistic.”
  • In a discussion about a risky investment, one might caution, “Being overoptimistic about the returns can lead to financial losses.”
  • A friend might advise another, “You need to be careful not to be overoptimistic about your chances of success. It’s important to have a backup plan.”

38. Overconfident

This term refers to someone who has an excessive amount of confidence or belief in their abilities, often to the point of being arrogant or cocky.

  • For example, someone might say, “His overconfidence will be his downfall. He underestimates his opponents.”
  • In a discussion about a job interview, one might advise, “Don’t be overconfident. It’s important to prepare and not take it lightly.”
  • A coach might warn a team, “Overconfidence can lead to complacency. Stay focused and humble.”

39. Oversold

This term describes something that has been excessively promoted or marketed, often leading to exaggerated expectations or disappointment when the reality does not match the hype.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The product was oversold. It didn’t live up to the claims made in the advertisements.”
  • In a discussion about a concert, one might comment, “The band was oversold. The performance was lackluster.”
  • A customer might review a restaurant and note, “The food was oversold. It didn’t taste as amazing as described in the reviews.”

40. Extra

This term is used to describe someone or something that is excessive, over-the-top, or goes beyond what is necessary or expected.

  • For example, a person might say, “She’s always so extra with her outfits. She loves attention.”
  • In a discussion about a party, one might comment, “The decorations were extra. It was like a fairy tale.”
  • A friend might describe another’s reaction as, “You’re being extra about this. It’s not that big of a deal.”

41. Hype

This term refers to the excessive excitement or promotion surrounding something, often leading to exaggerated expectations. It can also mean to build up or generate excitement for a particular event or product.

  • For example, “The hype surrounding the new movie is unreal!”
  • A person might say, “I’m hyped for the concert tomorrow!”
  • In a discussion about a highly anticipated video game, someone might comment, “The hype for this game is off the charts!”

42. OTT

This term is used to describe something that is excessive, exaggerated, or overdone. It can refer to a person’s behavior, a situation, or an event that goes beyond what is considered normal or reasonable.

  • For instance, “Her reaction to winning the lottery was totally OTT!”
  • In a discussion about a flamboyant fashion style, someone might say, “Their outfits are always so OTT.”
  • A person might comment, “The special effects in that movie were way OTT.”

43. Dramatic

This term is used to describe behavior or situations that are exaggerated or theatrical in nature. It can refer to someone who tends to overreact or create a scene, or to events that are filled with intense emotions or actions.

  • For example, “She always makes everything so dramatic!”
  • In a discussion about a soap opera, someone might say, “The plot twists are so dramatic.”
  • A person might comment, “The argument between those two was incredibly dramatic.”

44. Over the moon

This term is used to describe a feeling of extreme happiness or excitement. It implies that someone is so thrilled or delighted about something that they feel as if they are floating or soaring above the moon.

  • For instance, “She was over the moon when she got accepted into her dream college.”
  • In a discussion about a surprise party, someone might say, “He was totally over the moon when he walked in.”
  • A person might comment, “I’ll be over the moon if I win the lottery!”

45. Wildly exaggerated

This term is used to describe something that has been greatly exaggerated or embellished. It implies that the original story or information has been distorted or amplified to an extreme degree.

  • For example, “His description of the fishing trip was wildly exaggerated.”
  • In a discussion about a rumor, someone might say, “That story is wildly exaggerated.”
  • A person might comment, “The news headlines are often filled with wildly exaggerated claims.”

46. Overreacting

This term refers to reacting to a situation in an exaggerated or disproportionate manner. It implies that the person is overemphasizing the significance or impact of the event.

  • For example, if someone screams and runs away from a harmless spider, you might say, “Wow, talk about overreacting.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of overreacting to a minor disagreement.
  • If someone bursts into tears over a small disappointment, you could comment, “That’s a bit of an overreaction, don’t you think?”

47. Over-the-top

This phrase describes something that is exaggerated, excessive, or extreme in nature. It suggests that the subject goes beyond what is considered normal or reasonable.

  • For instance, if someone throws an extravagant party with live animals and a helicopter, you might say, “That’s definitely over-the-top.”
  • In a movie with exaggerated special effects and dramatic action sequences, you could say, “The film’s over-the-top action scenes were thrilling.”
  • If someone wears an outrageous and flamboyant outfit, you might comment, “Their fashion sense is always over-the-top.”

48. Overzealous

This term describes someone who is excessively enthusiastic, passionate, or eager about something. It implies that the person’s enthusiasm exceeds what is considered normal or appropriate.

  • For example, if someone is a die-hard fan of a sports team and goes to every game, even when they’re not playing, you might say, “They’re a bit overzealous.”
  • In a debate or discussion, someone who passionately defends their position might be labeled as overzealous.
  • If someone devotes an excessive amount of time and energy to a hobby or interest, you could comment, “They’re really overzealous about that.”

49. Overdramatic

This term describes someone who behaves or reacts in an exaggeratedly dramatic manner. It suggests that the person’s emotions or actions are more intense or theatrical than necessary.

  • For instance, if someone dramatically falls to the ground after stubbing their toe, you might say, “Don’t be so overdramatic.”
  • In a movie or play, an actor who delivers their lines with exaggerated gestures and emotions might be criticized as overdramatic.
  • If someone reacts with excessive drama to a minor inconvenience, you could comment, “They’re always so overdramatic.”

50. Overkill

This term refers to using more force, effort, or resources than necessary to accomplish a task or achieve a result. It implies that the level of action or response is excessive or unnecessary.

  • For example, if someone uses a sledgehammer to crack open a walnut, you might say, “That’s a bit of an overkill.”
  • In a video game, if a player uses a powerful weapon to defeat a weak enemy, you could comment, “That’s definitely overkill.”
  • If someone spends hours cleaning a spotless room, you might jokingly say, “Talk about overkill.”

51. Outrageously exaggerated

This term is used to describe something that is exaggerated to an extreme degree.

  • For example, “The fisherman’s story about the size of the fish he caught was outrageously exaggerated.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The special effects in that film were outrageously exaggerated.”
  • A person might describe a party as, “The decorations were outrageously exaggerated, with over-the-top designs and colors.”

52. Beyond belief

This phrase is used to describe something that is difficult to believe because it is so exaggerated.

  • For instance, “The amount of food she ate was beyond belief.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s accomplishments, someone might say, “His success in such a short time is beyond belief.”
  • A person might describe a story they heard as, “The details of the incident were beyond belief, with unbelievable twists and turns.”

53. Grossly exaggerated

This term is used to describe something that is exaggerated to a significant extent.

  • For example, “The price he quoted for the car was grossly exaggerated.”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might say, “The headline was grossly exaggerated and didn’t accurately reflect the content.”
  • A person might describe a rumor as, “The rumors about their breakup were grossly exaggerated, with false information being spread.”

54. Seriously OTT

This phrase is used to describe something that is excessively exaggerated.

  • For instance, “Her reaction to the news was seriously OTT.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “The decorations were seriously OTT, with extravagant designs and excessive use of glitter.”
  • A person might describe a performance as, “The actor’s portrayal of the character was seriously over the top, with exaggerated gestures and expressions.”

55. Totally blown out of proportion

This phrase is used to describe something that has been exaggerated to an extreme extent.

  • For example, “The media coverage of the incident was totally blown out of proportion.”
  • In a discussion about a minor issue, someone might say, “The argument between them was totally blown out of proportion.”
  • A person might describe a reaction as, “His anger towards the situation was totally blown out of proportion, with unnecessary yelling and aggression.”

56. Ridiculously exaggerated

This phrase is used to describe something that is greatly exaggerated or exaggerated to an extreme degree. It implies that the level of exaggeration is so extreme that it is almost ridiculous.

  • For example, “His story about catching a fish was ridiculously exaggerated. It went from a small trout to a 10-foot shark.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s achievements, one might say, “His claims of success are often ridiculously exaggerated.”
  • A person might comment on an exaggerated advertisement, “The claims made in that commercial are ridiculously exaggerated.”

57. Excessively embellished

This phrase describes something that is exaggerated with additional details or embellishments. It suggests that the original story or description has been exaggerated beyond what is necessary or accurate.

  • For instance, “Her story about her vacation was excessively embellished. She added details about encounters with celebrities that never happened.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s achievements, one might say, “He tends to make his accomplishments sound more impressive by excessively embellishing the details.”
  • A person might criticize a news article by saying, “The journalist took a simple event and excessively embellished it to create a sensational story.”

58. Unbelievably exaggerated

This phrase is used to describe something that is exaggerated to the point where it is difficult to believe or accept. It implies that the level of exaggeration is so extreme that it is hard to imagine it being true.

  • For example, “His story about encountering a UFO was unbelievably exaggerated. He claimed to have been abducted by aliens and taken to another planet.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s abilities, one might say, “Her claims of being able to lift a car are unbelievably exaggerated.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s tall tale by saying, “Your story about winning the lottery is unbelievably exaggerated.”

59. Hugely exaggerated

This phrase is used to describe something that is exaggerated to a large or significant degree. It suggests that the level of exaggeration is substantial and beyond what is considered normal or reasonable.

  • For instance, “The rumors about the celebrity’s behavior were hugely exaggerated. People claimed she threw a tantrum, but in reality, she just expressed her disappointment.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s accomplishments, one might say, “The media often portrays him as a genius, but that’s hugely exaggerated.”
  • A person might criticize a movie review by saying, “The reviewer’s negative comments were hugely exaggerated. The movie wasn’t that bad.”

60. Outlandishly exaggerated

This phrase is used to describe something that is exaggerated in a bizarre or outrageous manner. It implies that the level of exaggeration is so extreme that it is beyond what is considered normal or rational.

  • For example, “His story about his encounter with a mythical creature was outlandishly exaggerated. He claimed to have seen a unicorn dancing in his backyard.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s abilities, one might say, “Her claims of being able to fly are outlandishly exaggerated.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s tall tale by saying, “Your story about traveling to another dimension is outlandishly exaggerated.”

61. Grossly overstated

When something is described or presented in a way that greatly exaggerates its true nature or extent.

  • For example, “The news report about the crime was grossly overstated to create panic.”
  • In a discussion about a sports performance, someone might say, “The commentator’s claim that the player is the best ever is grossly overstated.”
  • A person might criticize a political speech saying, “The candidate’s promises are grossly overstated and unlikely to be fulfilled.”

62. Highly exaggerated

When something is portrayed or described in a way that amplifies or embellishes its characteristics or significance.

  • For instance, “The movie’s depiction of the historical event was highly exaggerated for dramatic effect.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s fishing story, someone might comment, “His description of the fish he caught is highly exaggerated.”
  • A person might criticize a news article stating, “The journalist’s account of the incident is highly exaggerated and lacks factual evidence.”

63. Incredibly exaggerated

When something is depicted or described in a manner that greatly magnifies or embellishes its features or importance.

  • For example, “The advertisement’s claims about the product are incredibly exaggerated to attract customers.”
  • In a discussion about a performance, someone might say, “The singer’s vocal range was incredibly exaggerated in that song.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s story saying, “Your description of the party is incredibly exaggerated. It wasn’t that exciting.”

64. Totally overblown

When something is represented or described in a way that greatly amplifies or exaggerates its significance or impact.

  • For instance, “The media’s coverage of the celebrity scandal was totally overblown and sensationalized.”
  • In a conversation about a rumor, someone might say, “The rumors about the company’s bankruptcy are totally overblown.”
  • A person might criticize a social media post stating, “Your claim about the health benefits of that product is totally overblown and lacks scientific evidence.”

65. Seriously exaggerated

When something is portrayed or described in a manner that greatly magnifies or embellishes its attributes or importance.

  • For example, “The politician’s promises during the campaign were seriously exaggerated to win votes.”
  • In a discussion about a friend’s achievements, someone might comment, “His description of his accomplishments is seriously exaggerated.”
  • A person might question a news headline stating, “The headline’s claim about the economic crisis is seriously exaggerated and misleading.”

66. Extremely embellished

This phrase is used to describe something that has been greatly exaggerated or embellished beyond the truth.

  • For example, “His story about catching a fish was extremely embellished. It was just a small trout.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The action scenes were extremely embellished for dramatic effect.”
  • A person might exaggerate their accomplishments and say, “I ran a marathon in under two hours. It was extremely embellished, of course.”

67. Vastly exaggerated

This term is used to describe something that has been greatly exaggerated or overstated, often to make it seem more impressive or dramatic.

  • For instance, “The rumors about the celebrity’s behavior were vastly exaggerated. It was just a minor disagreement.”
  • In a conversation about a sports performance, someone might say, “The announcer’s description of the play was vastly exaggerated. It was a routine catch.”
  • A person might exaggerate their cooking skills and say, “I make the best lasagna in the world. That’s vastly exaggerated, but it’s pretty good.”

68. Utterly blown out of proportion

This phrase is used to describe something that has been completely exaggerated or blown out of proportion, often to make it seem more significant or dramatic than it actually is.

  • For example, “The media coverage of the scandal was utterly blown out of proportion. It was a minor mistake.”
  • In a discussion about a social media post, someone might say, “The reaction to the photo was utterly blown out of proportion. It was just a joke.”
  • A person might exaggerate a minor inconvenience and say, “The traffic was utterly blown out of proportion. It only delayed me for a few minutes.”

69. Insanely exaggerated

This term is used to describe something that has been excessively exaggerated or overstated, often to make it seem more extreme or unbelievable.

  • For instance, “Her description of the party was insanely exaggerated. It was just a small gathering.”
  • In a conversation about a news article, someone might say, “The headline was insanely exaggerated. The story was much less dramatic.”
  • A person might exaggerate their reaction to a scary movie and say, “I was insanely scared. Well, maybe just a little spooked.”

70. Completely over the top

This phrase is used to describe something that is excessively exaggerated or overdone, often to the point of being ridiculous or absurd.

  • For example, “The special effects in the movie were completely over the top. It was too much.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “The decorations were completely over the top. It was like a circus.”
  • A person might exaggerate their excitement and say, “I am completely over the top about this concert. I can’t wait!”

71. Way too exaggerated

This phrase is used to describe something that is excessively exaggerated or exaggerated beyond what is reasonable or believable. It is often used to emphasize the extent of an exaggeration.

  • For example, “His story about catching a fish that was as big as a whale was way too exaggerated.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s reaction, one might say, “Her response was way too exaggerated for such a small issue.”
  • A person describing a movie might comment, “The special effects in that film were way too exaggerated, it was hard to take seriously.”
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