Top 40 Slang For Exemplify – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ideas or concepts in a vivid and impactful way, having the right slang can make all the difference. In this article, we’ve gathered some of the most effective and trendy terms to help you exemplify your points with flair. Whether you’re writing an essay, giving a presentation, or simply chatting with friends, these expressions will take your communication skills to the next level. Get ready to add some spice to your language and leave a lasting impression!

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1. Demo

Short for “demonstration,” a demo is a way to showcase or display the functionality or features of a product or service.

  • For example, a software company might release a demo version of their new video game for users to try.
  • A technology company might give a live demo of their latest smartphone at a trade show.
  • A salesperson might say, “Let me give you a quick demo of how this product works.”

2. Showcase

To showcase something means to display or present it in a way that highlights its best qualities or features.

  • For instance, an art gallery might showcase the works of a famous painter.
  • A fashion designer might showcase their latest collection on the runway.
  • A company might use their website to showcase their portfolio of successful projects.

3. Illustrate

When you illustrate something, you provide examples or visual representations to help explain or clarify a concept or idea.

  • For example, a teacher might use a diagram or picture to illustrate a difficult math problem.
  • A presenter might use a slideshow to illustrate the key points of their speech.
  • A writer might use a story or anecdote to illustrate a point they are trying to make.

4. Display

To display something means to present it in a way that allows others to see or observe it.

  • For instance, an art museum might display a famous painting for visitors to admire.
  • A store might display products in their front window to attract customers.
  • A scientist might display their research findings at a conference.

5. Represent

When something represents something else, it stands for or symbolizes it in some way.

  • For example, a flag represents a country or organization.
  • A logo represents a brand or company.
  • A character in a novel might represent a certain idea or theme.

6. Model

To model something means to represent or embody a particular quality or characteristic. It can also refer to setting an example or serving as a role model.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want you to model good behavior for the rest of the class.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might mention, “A good leader should model integrity and honesty.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “I want you to model kindness and respect towards others.”

7. Manifest

To manifest something means to demonstrate or show it clearly. It can also refer to making something visible or evident.

  • For instance, a student might say, “I want to manifest my dedication to my studies by getting good grades.”
  • In a conversation about achieving goals, someone might say, “You need to manifest your dreams into reality through hard work and perseverance.”
  • A person discussing their talents might say, “I manifest my creativity through painting and writing.”

8. Expose

To expose something means to reveal or make it known. It can also refer to bringing something to light or uncovering the truth.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I want to expose the corruption within the government.”
  • In a discussion about a scandal, someone might say, “The whistleblower helped expose the truth.”
  • A person discussing their personal experiences might say, “I want to expose the realities of living with a mental illness.”

9. Exhibit

To exhibit something means to display or show it, often in a public setting. It can also refer to showcasing or presenting something.

  • For instance, an artist might say, “I will exhibit my paintings at the gallery next month.”
  • In a conversation about a museum, someone might mention, “They have a new exhibit on ancient Egyptian artifacts.”
  • A person discussing their achievements might say, “I want to exhibit my skills and talents during the competition.”

10. Embody

To embody something means to personify or represent it in a physical or tangible form. It can also refer to being a perfect example or embodiment of a particular quality or characteristic.

  • For example, a dancer might say, “I try to embody grace and elegance in my performances.”
  • In a discussion about a historical figure, someone might say, “He truly embodied the spirit of the American Revolution.”
  • A person discussing their values might say, “I want to embody kindness and compassion in my everyday life.”

11. Depict

To portray or represent something in a visual or descriptive way. “Depict” is often used to emphasize the act of vividly illustrating or capturing the essence of something.

  • For example, a movie critic might say, “The film beautifully depicts the struggles of the main character.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might comment, “The painting vividly depicts the chaos and emotion of that moment.”
  • A writer might use the word in a sentence like, “The author skillfully depicts the vibrant streets of the city in her novel.”

12. Exemplarize

To serve as a prime or ideal example of something. “Exemplarize” is a less common term but is used to highlight the act of embodying or personifying a particular quality or characteristic.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “This student exemplarizes hard work and dedication.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might comment, “She exemplarizes the qualities of a true leader.”
  • A motivational speaker might use the word in a sentence like, “Let these success stories exemplarize what’s possible with determination and perseverance.”

13. Typify

To serve as a typical or representative example of something. “Typify” is often used to emphasize the act of embodying or encapsulating the common or expected characteristics of a particular group or category.

  • For example, a sociologist might say, “These findings typify the behavior of young adults in urban areas.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might comment, “Her style typifies the trends of the 90s.”
  • A journalist might use the word in a sentence like, “The city’s response to the disaster typifies the resilience of its citizens.”

14. Symbolize

To represent or stand for something else, often with a deeper or symbolic meaning. “Symbolize” is used to highlight the act of using a symbol or sign to convey a concept, idea, or quality.

  • For instance, a white dove often symbolizes peace and purity.
  • In a discussion about literature, someone might comment, “The green light in the novel symbolizes hope and longing.”
  • An art critic might use the word in a sentence like, “The use of vibrant colors symbolizes the artist’s passion and energy.”

15. Signify

To indicate, mean, or represent something. “Signify” is often used to emphasize the act of conveying or expressing a particular idea or concept.

  • For example, a red traffic light signifies the need to stop.
  • In a discussion about body language, someone might comment, “Crossed arms often signify defensiveness or discomfort.”
  • A linguist might use the word in a sentence like, “The word ‘love’ signifies a deep affection or attachment.”

16. Demonstrate

To show or prove something clearly and convincingly. “Demonstrate” is often used when providing evidence or showcasing a skill or ability.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me demonstrate how to solve this math problem.”
  • In a science experiment, a student might say, “I will demonstrate the effects of gravity by dropping this ball.”
  • A presenter at a conference might say, “I will demonstrate the new features of our software with a live demo.”

17. Show

To present or exhibit something for others to see. “Show” is a versatile term that can be used in various contexts to indicate visually presenting or revealing something.

  • For instance, a tour guide might say, “Let me show you the famous landmarks of the city.”
  • In a cooking show, a chef might say, “I will show you how to prepare a delicious meal.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Show me your artwork that you made at school today.”

18. Clarify

To make something easier to understand or comprehend. “Clarify” is often used when providing additional information or explanations to eliminate confusion or ambiguity.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I will clarify the instructions for this assignment.”
  • In a meeting, a participant might say, “Can you clarify what you meant by that statement?”
  • A writer might include a footnote to clarify a complex term or concept in their article.
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19. Explain

To make something clear and understandable by providing details or descriptions. “Explain” is a common term used when breaking down complex ideas or processes into simpler terms.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Let me explain how lightning is formed.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “I will explain the key concepts of this theory.”
  • A teacher might explain the steps of a math problem to a student who is struggling to understand.

20. Portray

To represent or describe something or someone in a particular way. “Portray” is often used when discussing how something is presented or depicted in art, media, or literature.

  • For example, a film critic might say, “The actor skillfully portrayed the emotions of the character.”
  • In a historical painting, an artist might portray a significant event or figure from the past.
  • A writer might portray a protagonist as a strong and determined individual in their novel.

21. Highlight

To bring attention to or emphasize something. The term “highlight” is often used to showcase or draw attention to a particular aspect or detail.

  • For example, in a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me highlight the key points of this report.”
  • In a review of a movie, a critic might write, “The film’s cinematography highlights the stunning landscapes.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The player’s performance last night really highlighted their skill and talent.”

22. Evince

To show or make evident. “Evince” is a more formal and less commonly used word for demonstrating or revealing something.

  • For instance, in a scientific experiment, the data might evince a clear correlation between two variables.
  • In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “The evidence presented evinces the defendant’s guilt.”
  • A teacher might say, “The student’s hard work and improvement evince their dedication to learning.”

23. Betoken

To be a sign or indication of something. “Betoken” is a word used to describe something that symbolizes or represents a particular meaning or outcome.

  • For example, dark clouds can betoken an approaching storm.
  • A dream about falling can betoken feelings of insecurity or fear.
  • A red traffic light betokens the need to stop.
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24. Reveal

To make something known or visible that was previously hidden or secret. “Reveal” is a common word used to describe the act of uncovering or disclosing something.

  • For instance, a magician might reveal their trick to the audience.
  • In a mystery novel, the final chapter reveals the identity of the killer.
  • A surprise party is planned to reveal the celebration to the unsuspecting guest.

25. Unveil

To make something known or visible for the first time. “Unveil” is often used to describe the act of introducing or revealing something new or previously unseen.

  • For example, a company might unveil a new product at a press conference.
  • An artist might unveil their latest artwork at an exhibition.
  • A city might unveil a new monument or statue in a public square.

26. Uncover

To reveal or make something known that was previously hidden or secret. “Uncover” is often used to describe the act of revealing the truth or exposing wrongdoing.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I uncovered new evidence that implicates the politician in the scandal.”
  • In a mystery novel, a detective might say, “I’m determined to uncover the truth behind this murder.”
  • A whistleblower might say, “I decided to come forward and uncover the corruption within the company.”

27. Convey

To communicate or make something known. “Convey” is often used to describe the act of expressing thoughts, ideas, or emotions.

  • For instance, a poet might say, “Through my words, I hope to convey the beauty of nature.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “I want to convey the importance of this issue to all of you.”
  • A songwriter might say, “I use music to convey my deepest emotions and experiences.”

28. Exemplar

A person or thing that is considered an excellent example or model of something. “Exemplar” is often used to describe someone or something that represents the best or ideal version of a particular quality or characteristic.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “This student is an exemplar of hard work and dedication.”
  • In a museum, a tour guide might say, “This painting is an exemplar of the artist’s style and technique.”
  • A coach might say, “We need to follow the exemplar set by the previous championship-winning team.”

29. Exemplify

To serve as a typical or representative example of something. “Exemplify” is often used to describe the act of demonstrating or illustrating a particular quality or characteristic.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “This experiment exemplifies the effects of climate change.”
  • In a debate, a debater might say, “This case exemplifies the need for stricter gun control laws.”
  • An art critic might say, “This painting exemplifies the artist’s unique style and vision.”

30. Emphasize

To give special importance or attention to something. “Emphasize” is often used to describe the act of placing emphasis or drawing attention to a particular aspect or point.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want to emphasize the importance of studying for the upcoming exam.”
  • In a speech, a speaker might say, “Let me emphasize that we must work together to solve this problem.”
  • A manager might say, “I want to emphasize the need for teamwork and collaboration in this project.”

31. Point out

To draw attention to or emphasize something.

  • For example, “Let me point out the key features of this diagram.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I just want to point out that the deadline is approaching.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you point out the main idea of this passage?”

32. Indicate

To suggest or demonstrate something.

  • For instance, “The data indicates a strong correlation between these two variables.”
  • A sign might indicate the direction to a specific location.
  • A weather report might indicate that rain is expected later in the day.
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33. Elucidate

To make something clearer or easier to understand.

  • For example, “Can you elucidate your point further?”
  • A teacher might say, “I will elucidate the concept with an example.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “Let me elucidate the main findings of our research.”

34. Express

To communicate or show a feeling, thought, or idea.

  • For instance, “She expressed her gratitude for the help.”
  • A painting can express emotions and meaning through color and composition.
  • A writer might express their opinion in an article.

35. Characterize

To describe the distinctive features or qualities of something or someone.

  • For example, “The novel characterizes the struggles of a young immigrant.”
  • A reviewer might characterize a movie as thrilling and suspenseful.
  • A historian might characterize a period of time as a time of great change.

36. Emulate

To copy or imitate someone or something, often with the intention of matching or surpassing their qualities or achievements.

  • For example, a young athlete might say, “I want to emulate Michael Jordan’s basketball skills.”
  • In the tech industry, a company might strive to emulate the success of a competitor’s product.
  • A student might try to emulate their favorite author’s writing style in their own work.

37. Symbol

An object, image, or word that represents or stands for something else, often with a deeper or more complex meaning.

  • For instance, a red rose is often used as a symbol of love and romance.
  • In literature, the white whale in “Moby-Dick” is a symbol of obsession.
  • The American flag is a symbol of freedom and patriotism.

38. Image

A visual representation or picture of someone or something, often captured through photography or other visual media.

  • For example, a photographer might take an image of a beautiful sunset.
  • In advertising, companies use images to promote their products and create a desired perception.
  • A person’s online image can be influenced by the way they present themselves on social media.

39. Mirror

To reflect or represent something, often in a way that closely resembles or mirrors the original.

  • For instance, a well-written poem can mirror the emotions and experiences of the reader.
  • A movie might mirror real-life events or societal issues.
  • A person’s actions can mirror their values and beliefs.

40. Personify

To embody or represent a quality, idea, or concept in the form of a person or character.

  • For example, the character of Sherlock Holmes personifies logic and deductive reasoning.
  • In mythology, gods and goddesses often personify natural forces or human emotions.
  • A brand mascot can personify the values and personality of a company.