Top 47 Slang For Filipino – Meaning & Usage

Filipino slang is a vibrant and ever-evolving aspect of the country’s culture. From unique expressions to playful abbreviations, it can be a challenge for outsiders to keep up. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered! In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top Filipino slang words and phrases that will not only help you navigate conversations with locals but also give you a deeper understanding of Filipino language and humor. So, get ready to level up your Filipino vocabulary and impress your friends with these trendy slang terms!

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1. Nyek

This term is often used to express surprise or disbelief in a playful or sarcastic manner.

  • For example, if someone tells a ridiculous story, you might respond with “Nyek, talaga?”
  • In a conversation about unexpected news, you could say, “Nyek, hindi ko akalain!”
  • A person might use “Nyek” to mockingly show disbelief,“Nyek” to mockingly show disbelief, like “Nyek, feeling mo naman sikat ka!”.

2. Jowa

This slang term is commonly used to refer to a boyfriend or girlfriend.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Kumain kami ng jowa ko sa labas.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, you could ask, “Saan mo nakilala yung jowa mo?”
  • A person might use “jowa” to describe their significant other,“jowa” to describe their significant other, like “Ang sweet ng jowa ko, binigyan niya ako ng flowers.”

3. Charot

This term is often used to indicate that the previous statement was said in a sarcastic or joking manner.

  • For example, if someone says something outrageous, you might respond with “Charot lang!”
  • In a conversation about an unlikely scenario, you could say, “Sasakyan mo yung buwan? Charot!”
  • A person might use “charot” to clarify that they were just kidding,“charot” to clarify that they were just kidding, like “Ang pangit naman ng suot mo! Charot lang, ang ganda mo naman!”

4. Chibog

This slang term is commonly used to refer to food or the act of eating.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Anong chibog natin sa lunch?”
  • In a conversation about trying different cuisines, you could ask, “Nakapag-try ka na ba ng Indian chibog?”
  • A person might use “chibog” to invite others to eat,“chibog” to invite others to eat, like “Tara, chibogan tayo mamaya!”

5. Lodi

This slang term is often used to refer to someone who is admired or respected.

  • For example, if someone accomplishes something impressive, you might say “Lodi, galing mo!”
  • In a conversation about role models, you could ask, “Sino yung mga lodi mo sa showbiz?”
  • A person might use “lodi” to express admiration,“lodi” to express admiration, like “Ang galing talaga ni LeBron James, lodi ko yan!”

6. Anak ng kamote

This phrase is used as an expression of surprise or frustration. It is often used to convey disbelief or annoyance.

  • For example, if someone makes a mistake, someone might exclaim, “Anak ng kamote! What were you thinking?”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “Anak ng kamote, this traffic is unbearable.”
  • When someone hears a shocking news, they might react with, “Anak ng kamote, I can’t believe it!”

7. Diba

This term is used to seek agreement or confirmation from the listener. It is often added at the end of a statement to turn it into a question.

  • For instance, someone might say, “The weather is so hot, diba?”
  • In a discussion about a popular TV show, someone might ask, “The latest episode was intense, diba?”
  • When expressing an opinion, someone might say, “That movie was amazing, diba?”

8. Jeproks

This slang term is used to describe something or someone as cool, stylish, or fashionable. It is often used to refer to someone who has a unique and trendy sense of style.

  • For example, someone might say, “That outfit is so jeproks!”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “This band’s sound is really jeproks.”
  • When describing a person, someone might say, “He’s always dressed so jeproks.”

9. Churva

This term is used as a filler word when someone can’t think of the exact word or phrase to use. It is similar to saying “et cetera” or “whatever” in English.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Can you pass me the… churva?”
  • In a conversation about a vague memory, someone might say, “I remember going to that churva place.”
  • When someone is unsure about something, they might say, “I think it’s in the churva section.”

10. Gigil

This term is used to describe an intense feeling of excitement, frustration, or even the urge to squeeze or pinch something cute or adorable.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m gigil-ing over this cute puppy!”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “I’m gigil-ing with frustration.”
  • When expressing admiration for someone’s talent, someone might say, “I’m gigil-ing over their amazing skills.”

11. Ngek

Ngek is a slang term used to express surprise, disbelief, or shock. It is often used in casual conversations or online chats.

  • For example, if someone tells you an unexpected news, you might reply, “Ngek! Are you serious?”
  • When someone shares a funny story, you can respond with, “Ngek! That’s hilarious.”
  • If someone tells a far-fetched story, you might react with, “Ngek! I don’t believe you.”

12. Basta

Basta is a versatile Filipino slang word that can mean different things depending on the context. It is often used to express a sense of indifference, assurance, or determination.

  • For instance, if someone asks for an explanation, you can simply reply, “Basta.” which means “Just because” or “I don’t need to explain.”
  • When making plans, you might say, “Basta, let’s meet at 7 PM.” meaning “Just meet me at 7 PM, no need for further details.”
  • In a conversation about personal choices, someone might say, “Basta, I know what’s best for me.” indicating their determination to stick to their decision.
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13. Chika

Chika is a slang term used to refer to gossip or news. It is commonly used in casual conversations among friends or acquaintances.

  • For example, if someone says, “I have some chika for you,” it means they have some gossip to share.
  • When catching up with a friend, you might ask, “What’s the chika?” meaning “What’s the latest news or gossip?”
  • If someone overhears an interesting conversation, they might say, “I heard some chika about that topic.”

14. Hay naku

Hay naku is a common Filipino slang expression used to convey exasperation, frustration, or annoyance. It is often used in response to a challenging or irritating situation.

  • For instance, if someone makes a mistake, you might say, “Hay naku, not again!”
  • When faced with a difficult task, you can exclaim, “Hay naku, this is going to be tough.”
  • If someone shares a frustrating experience, you might sympathize by saying, “Hay naku, that sounds really frustrating.”

15. Ano ba?

Ano ba? is a Filipino slang phrase used to express annoyance, impatience, or exasperation. It is often used when someone is being unclear, indecisive, or irritating.

  • For example, if someone keeps changing their mind, you might say, “Ano ba? Make up your mind!”
  • When someone is taking too long to respond, you can ask, “Ano ba? Can you hurry up?”
  • If someone is being vague or evasive, you might say, “Ano ba talaga? Just tell me the truth.”

16. Pinoy

This term is a colloquial way of referring to a Filipino person. It is often used as a term of endearment or as a way to express national pride.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m proud to be a Pinoy!”
  • In a conversation about Filipino culture, a person might ask, “Do you know any popular Pinoy dishes?”
  • A Filipino living abroad might say, “I miss the Pinoy sense of community.”

17. Balikbayan

This term is used to describe a Filipino who is returning to the Philippines after living or working abroad. It is often associated with Filipinos who bring back gifts or pasalubong for their family and friends.

  • For instance, during the holiday season, many balikbayans travel back to the Philippines to celebrate with their loved ones.
  • In a discussion about overseas Filipino workers, someone might mention, “Many balikbayans contribute to the country’s economy through remittances.”
  • A Filipino who just arrived back in the Philippines might say, “I’m excited to see my family again. I feel like a balikbayan.”

18. Tita

In Filipino slang, the term “tita” is used to refer to an older woman, typically a family friend or relative. It is often associated with someone who is stylish, knowledgeable, and gives advice.

  • For example, a person might say, “My tita always knows the latest fashion trends.”
  • When talking about family gatherings, someone might mention, “The titas always have the juiciest gossip.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I’m turning into a tita. I love staying in and drinking tea.”

19. Kuya

In Filipino culture, the term “kuya” is used to address an older brother or a male authority figure. It is a term of respect and is often used to show deference to an older male.

  • For instance, a younger sibling might say, “Kuya, can you help me with my homework?”
  • In a conversation about family dynamics, someone might mention, “The kuya is usually responsible for taking care of the younger siblings.”
  • When talking about a helpful male friend, someone might say, “He’s like a kuya to me. He always looks out for me.”

20. Ate

Similar to “kuya,” the term “ate” is used to address an older sister or a female authority figure in Filipino culture. It is a term of respect and is often used to show deference to an older female.

  • For example, a younger sibling might say, “Ate, can you help me pick out an outfit?”
  • In a conversation about sibling relationships, someone might mention, “The ate is usually the one who gives advice and takes care of the younger siblings.”
  • When talking about a supportive female friend, someone might say, “She’s like an ate to me. She always gives me good advice.”

21. Bes

This term is a shortened version of “best friend” and is commonly used among friends to refer to each other in a casual and endearing way.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hey, bes! Let’s go grab some food.”
  • When sharing exciting news, someone might exclaim, “Guess what, bes? I got the job!”
  • In a group chat, a friend might ask, “What’s everyone up to tonight, bes?”

22. Pogi

This Filipino slang term is used to describe a good-looking or attractive person, particularly a man.

  • For instance, a friend might compliment someone by saying, “Wow, you’re looking pogi today!”
  • When discussing celebrity crushes, someone might say, “I think James Reid is the pogi-est actor in the industry.”
  • A person might jokingly tell their friend, “Stop being so pogi, you’re making all the girls fall for you!”

23. Gwapo

Similar to “pogi,” this term is also used to describe a good-looking or attractive person, particularly a man. It is a more formal term compared to “pogi.”

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s so gwapo, he could be a model.”
  • When discussing someone’s appearance, a friend might comment, “You’re looking really gwapo in that outfit.”
  • A person might introduce their friend by saying, “This is my gwapo friend, he’s single and ready to mingle!”

24. Chismis

This term refers to gossip or rumors. It is commonly used to describe the act of spreading or discussing rumors about someone or something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I heard some chismis about that new couple in school.”
  • When someone shares juicy news, a friend might exclaim, “Spill the chismis, I want to know all the details!”
  • In a conversation about office drama, someone might say, “I try to stay away from chismis, it’s not good for the workplace.”

25. Barkada

This term is used to describe a group of friends or a squad. It is derived from the Filipino word “barkada,” which means a group of close friends.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going out with my barkada tonight.”
  • When discussing plans with friends, a person might ask, “Are we all meeting up with the barkada tomorrow?”
  • In a social media post, someone might tag their barkada and caption it, “My favorite people in the world.”

26. Kili-kili

This term refers to the armpit in Filipino slang. It is often used in a playful or casual manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to shave my kili-kili before going to the beach.”
  • In a conversation about body odor, someone might mention, “Using deodorant is important to keep your kili-kili fresh.”
  • A comedian might make a joke like, “Why did the chicken cross the road? To get to the other kili-kili!”

27. Kikay

This term is used to describe someone who is feminine or enjoys feminine things. It can also refer to someone who is fashionable or stylish.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She’s so kikay, always wearing dresses and makeup.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “Let’s go to the mall and check out the kikay section.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s outfit might say, “You look really kikay in that dress!”

28. Beshie

This term is a slang version of “bestie” or “best friend.” It is used to refer to a close friend or someone you consider like a sibling.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my beshie tonight.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “A true beshie will always have your back.”
  • A person expressing gratitude might say, “Thanks for being my beshie and always being there for me!”

29. Lab

This term is a shortened version of the word “love” in Filipino slang. It is often used to express affection or endearment.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I lab you” instead of “I love you.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Lab is a beautiful thing.”
  • A person expressing their feelings might say, “I lab spending time with you!”

30. Jologs

This term is used to describe something or someone who is considered tacky, uncool, or unfashionable in Filipino slang.

  • For example, a person might say, “That outfit is so jologs.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “I don’t like that artist, their music is jologs.”
  • A person criticizing someone’s taste might say, “Your choice in movies is so jologs!”

31. Suki

This term refers to a regular customer or patron of a particular establishment. It is often used in the context of small businesses or local shops.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve been going to that bakery for years, I’m their suki.”
  • In a conversation about a neighborhood grocery store, someone might mention, “I’m their suki, they always give me a discount.”
  • A business owner might ask, “How can we attract more suki to our store?”

32. Tropa

This term is used to refer to a group of friends or a close-knit circle. It signifies a strong bond and camaraderie among the individuals.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m going out with my tropa tonight.”
  • In a conversation about a recent trip, a person might mention, “It was so much fun traveling with my tropa.”
  • A group of friends might plan a get-together and say, “Let’s have a tropa reunion this weekend.”

33. Yorme

This term is a colloquial way of referring to a mayor, particularly in the context of local politics. It is derived from the Filipino word for “mayor” (alkalde).

  • For example, during an election, someone might say, “I’m voting for Yorme, he has done great things for our city.”
  • In a news article about a city’s development, the headline might read, “Yorme announces plans for infrastructure improvements.”
  • A citizen might express their support by saying, “Yorme is the best mayor we’ve ever had.”

34. Tito/Tita

These terms are used to refer to an older person, often someone in a position of authority or someone who is respected. It is a way to show politeness and respect towards an elder.

  • For instance, a younger person might say, “Tito, can I ask for your advice?”
  • In a family gathering, someone might address an older relative as “Tita” and say, “Tita, thank you for hosting this dinner.”
  • A person might introduce their uncle to a friend and say, “This is my Tito, he’s like a second father to me.”

35. Kuya/Ate

These terms are used to address an older sibling or someone who is older and considered like a sibling. It is a term of endearment and respect.

  • For example, a younger person might say, “Kuya, can you help me with my homework?”
  • In a family gathering, someone might address their older sister as “Ate” and say, “Ate, can you pass me the salt?”
  • A person might introduce their older brother to a friend and say, “This is my Kuya, he always looks out for me.”

36. Kain

This word is derived from the Filipino verb “kain” which means “to eat.” It is commonly used in casual conversations and is often used to express the act of eating.

  • For example, “Kain tayo sa labas” means “Let’s eat outside.”
  • When someone asks, “Anong kain natin?” it means “What are we going to eat?”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “Kain na!” which translates to “Let’s eat!”

37. Pogi/Gwapo

These words are Filipino slang terms used to describe a good-looking or attractive male individual. They are often used as compliments or to express admiration for someone’s physical appearance.

  • For instance, “Ang pogi mo!” means “You’re handsome!”
  • When someone says, “Gwapo niya!” it means “He’s good-looking!”
  • In a conversation about crushes, someone might say, “May nakita akong pogi sa school” which translates to “I saw a handsome guy at school.”

38. Chinito/Chinita

These words are used to describe someone, usually of Filipino descent, who has Chinese features such as almond-shaped eyes or fair skin. It is a colloquial term often used to refer to individuals with these physical characteristics.

  • For example, “Ang chinito niya” means “He’s chinito” referring to his Chinese features.
  • When someone says, “Chinita beauty” it means “She has chinita beauty” referring to her Chinese-like beauty.
  • In a conversation about preferences, someone might say, “Type ko yung chinita look” which translates to “I like the chinita look.”

39. Pasalubong

This word is derived from the Filipino verb “salubong” which means “to meet” or “to welcome.” It refers to a gift or souvenir brought by someone who is returning from a trip or visiting someone after being away for a while.

  • For instance, “May pasalubong ako para sa’yo” means “I have a souvenir for you.”
  • When someone asks, “Ano’ng pasalubong mo?” it means “What is your souvenir?”
  • In a conversation about travel, someone might say, “Nag-abroad ako, may pasalubong ako sa’yo” which translates to “I went abroad, I have a souvenir for you.”

40. Pabili

This word is derived from the Filipino verb “bili” which means “to buy.” It is commonly used to make a request for someone to buy or get something on behalf of the person making the request.

  • For example, “Pabili ng kape” means “Please buy me some coffee.”
  • When someone says, “Pabili ng tsinelas” it means “Please get me some slippers.”
  • In a conversation about errands, someone might say, “Pabili ako ng tinapay sa tindahan” which translates to “Please buy me some bread from the store.”

41. KKB

This phrase is commonly used to refer to a situation where each person pays for their own expenses or shares the cost equally. It is often used when splitting a bill or dividing expenses among a group.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s go out for dinner, but it’s KKB, okay?”
  • In a conversation about a group trip, someone might ask, “Is it KKB for the accommodations?”
  • A person discussing a night out with friends might say, “We went to a club last night, and it was KKB for the drinks.”

42. Keri

This slang term is derived from the English word “okay” and is commonly used in Filipino conversations to express agreement, acceptance, or reassurance. It is often used to indicate that something is manageable or doable.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you finish this task by tomorrow?” you might respond, “Keri lang.”
  • In a conversation about a challenging situation, someone might say, “Don’t worry, keri natin ‘to.”
  • A person discussing their workload might say, “I have a lot of tasks, but keri ko ‘to.”

43. Sawsaw

This term is used to describe the act of interjecting or adding one’s opinion or comment into a conversation or situation without being asked or invited. It can also refer to the act of meddling or interfering in someone else’s affairs.

  • For example, if someone is discussing a personal matter, another person might say, “Sawsaw lang ako, but have you considered this?”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Please don’t sawsaw if you don’t have anything relevant to contribute.”
  • A person discussing office politics might say, “She always sawsaws in other people’s projects.”

44. Chika-chika

This term is used to describe casual and often light-hearted conversations or discussions about other people’s lives, particularly focusing on gossip or rumors. It is commonly used to refer to friendly chit-chat or socializing.

  • For instance, if a group of friends is catching up, one might say, “Let’s have some chika-chika over coffee.”
  • In a conversation about the latest celebrity news, someone might say, “Have you heard the chika-chika about this actress?”
  • A person discussing office dynamics might say, “There’s always chika-chika happening in the break room.”

45. Keri lang

This phrase is commonly used to express reassurance or acceptance of a situation. It is often used to indicate that something is manageable or that one is willing to go along with a plan or decision.

  • For example, if someone suggests a change in plans, you might respond, “Keri lang, let’s do it.”
  • In a conversation about a minor inconvenience, someone might say, “It’s keri lang, no need to worry.”
  • A person discussing a challenging task might say, “It’s difficult, but keri lang, I can handle it.”

46. Mukhang pera

This phrase is used to describe someone who appears greedy or money-minded. It implies that the person is only interested in financial gain and may be willing to do anything for money.

  • For example, “Siya ay mukhang pera. Hindi siya interesado sa ibang bagay kundi sa pera.”
  • In a conversation about a person’s behavior, one might say, “Huwag ka nang umasa sa kanya, mukhang pera yan.”
  • Another usage could be, “Ang boss namin ay mukhang pera, lagi niyang pinag-iinitan ang mga empleyado.”

47. Jeprox

This term is used to refer to someone who spends a lot of time at the beach or has a laid-back lifestyle associated with beach culture. It can also describe someone who dresses in a casual and relaxed manner.

  • For instance, “Siya ay jeprox, lagi siyang nasa beach.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s fashion sense, one might say, “Ang suot niya ay jeprox, parang hindi siya nag-effort.”
  • Another usage could be, “Siya ay jeprox na tao, hindi siya masyadong nag-aalala sa mga bagay-bagay.”