Top 20 Slang For Firstly – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to starting a conversation or organizing thoughts, using the right words can make all the difference. But what if you’re tired of the same old “firstly”? Well, we’ve got you covered! Our team at FluentSlang has scoured the depths of the English language to bring you a collection of fresh and exciting slang terms for “firstly.” Get ready to shake up your vocabulary and add some flair to your sentences with this listicle. Trust us, you won’t want to miss out on this linguistic adventure!

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1. First and foremost

This phrase is used to emphasize the primary or most significant point or action.

  • For example, “First and foremost, we need to address the safety concerns.”
  • In a discussion about priorities, someone might say, “First and foremost, we need to focus on customer satisfaction.”
  • A speaker might begin their presentation with, “First and foremost, I want to thank you all for being here today.”

2. In the first place

This phrase is used to refer to something that was true or should have been considered from the beginning.

  • For instance, “If they didn’t want to participate, why did they join in the first place?”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “If it was such a bad idea, why was it proposed in the first place?”
  • A person discussing a failed project might comment, “They didn’t have a clear plan in the first place.”

3. To start off with

This phrase is used to introduce the first point or action in a series.

  • For example, “To start off with, let’s review the basics of the topic.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the instructor might say, “To start off with, we’ll need to preheat the oven.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to transition, “Now, to start off with the main topic of today’s discussion…”

4. To begin

This phrase is used to indicate the start of something.

  • For instance, “To begin, let’s introduce ourselves and share our background.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “To begin, let’s go over the agenda for today.”
  • A teacher might instruct the class, “To begin the assignment, please read the first chapter.”

5. To kick things off

This phrase is used to describe the act of starting or initiating something, often in an energetic or enthusiastic manner.

  • For example, “To kick things off, let’s play a fun icebreaker game.”
  • At a party, the host might say, “To kick things off, let’s have a toast to celebrate.”
  • A team captain might motivate their teammates by saying, “Let’s give it our all and really kick things off with a strong start.”

6. To lead off

This phrase is often used in sports to describe the act of being the first to bat or the first to pitch in a game. It can also be used in a broader sense to mean starting or initiating something.

  • For example, in a meeting, someone might say, “I’ll lead off the discussion with a brief overview.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let’s lead off with some key statistics.”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “We need a strong player to lead off the inning.”

7. To get the ball rolling

This phrase is used to describe the act of initiating or starting something, often with the intention of encouraging others to follow suit. It implies taking the first step in order to get things moving.

  • For instance, in a group project, someone might say, “Let’s get the ball rolling by assigning tasks.”
  • In a brainstorming session, a facilitator might say, “Who wants to get the ball rolling with some ideas?”
  • A team leader might say, “I’ll get the ball rolling by setting up a meeting to discuss the project.”

8. To commence

This word is a more formal alternative to “start” or “begin.” It implies the initiation of an action or process.

  • For example, in a ceremony, an official might say, “Ladies and gentlemen, let the ceremony commence.”
  • In a legal document, it might state, “This agreement shall commence on the effective date.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Please commence your work on the assignment.”

9. To initiate

This word implies taking the first step or introducing something new. It can be used in various contexts to indicate the beginning of an action, process, or relationship.

  • For instance, in a discussion, someone might say, “I’ll initiate the conversation by sharing my thoughts.”
  • In a scientific experiment, a researcher might state, “We will initiate the test by adding the chemical.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “To succeed in this industry, you need to initiate new projects and ideas.”

10. To open with

This phrase is often used to describe the act of starting a conversation, presentation, or performance with a particular topic or item. It suggests that the chosen element sets the tone or establishes the initial focus.

  • For example, in a speech, a speaker might say, “I’d like to open with a personal anecdote.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “Let’s open with a review of the agenda.”
  • A musician might announce, “We’ll open with our latest single to get the crowd excited.”

11. In the beginning

This phrase is used to indicate the initial stage or starting point of something.

  • For example, “In the beginning, I was unsure of how to approach the project.”
  • A storyteller might begin their tale with, “In the beginning, there was chaos and darkness.”
  • When recounting a personal journey, someone might say, “In the beginning, I had no idea where this path would lead me.”

12. At the outset

This expression is used to refer to the beginning or initial stage of a process or event.

  • For instance, “At the outset of the meeting, the facilitator outlined the agenda.”
  • A project manager might say, “We need to establish clear goals at the outset of the project.”
  • When discussing a new business venture, someone might mention, “At the outset, we faced many challenges, but we persevered.”

13. To jump-start

This phrase means to initiate or start something with energy and enthusiasm.

  • For example, “Let’s jump-start this brainstorming session with some creative ideas.”
  • A team leader might say, “We need to jump-start our marketing campaign to generate more leads.”
  • When planning an event, someone might suggest, “Let’s jump-start the festivities with a lively dance performance.”

14. To fire up

This slang phrase means to start or initiate something with passion or excitement.

  • For instance, “Let’s fire up this party with some energetic music and dancing.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “It’s time to fire up your dreams and pursue them with determination.”
  • When discussing a sports match, someone might exclaim, “The team needs to fire up their offense and score some points!”

15. To begin the ball rolling

This phrase means to initiate or start an action or process.

  • For example, “Let’s begin the ball rolling on this project by assigning tasks to team members.”
  • A group leader might say, “We need to begin the ball rolling on our fundraising campaign to reach our goal.”
  • When planning a community event, someone might suggest, “Let’s begin the ball rolling by securing a venue and setting a date.”

16. To commence with

This phrase is used to indicate that something is beginning or starting. It is a more formal way of saying “firstly” or “to begin with”.

  • For example, “To commence with, let’s go over the basic rules.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “To commence with, I would like to introduce our guest speaker.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “To commence with, please take out your textbooks and turn to page 1.”

17. To initiate proceedings

This expression is often used in legal or formal contexts to indicate the beginning of a specific action or procedure.

  • For instance, “The lawyer will initiate proceedings against the defendant.”
  • In a court case, a judge might say, “We will now initiate proceedings to hear the opening statements.”
  • A company might announce, “We have decided to initiate proceedings to resolve the dispute.”

18. To start things rolling

This phrase is used to indicate the beginning of an activity or process. It suggests taking the first step or initiating action.

  • For example, “Let’s start things rolling by brainstorming ideas.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need to start things rolling on the new project.”
  • A coach might motivate their team, saying, “Let’s start things rolling with a strong offense.”

19. To begin the process

This phrase is a straightforward way of indicating the start of a process or procedure.

  • For instance, “To begin the process, please fill out the application form.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We will begin the process of hiring new employees.”
  • A teacher might explain, “To begin the process of writing an essay, start by brainstorming ideas.”

20. To start off on the right foot

This expression is used to emphasize the importance of starting something in a positive or successful way.

  • For example, “To start off on the right foot, let’s establish clear goals for the project.”
  • In a job interview, a candidate might say, “I want to start off on the right foot by demonstrating my skills and dedication.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Let’s start off on the right foot by giving 100% in every practice.”
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