Top 79 Slang For Together – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing the act of being together, sometimes regular words just don’t cut it. That’s where slang for “together” comes in. Whether you’re trying to sound cool or simply want to stay up-to-date with the latest lingo, we’ve got you covered. From catchy phrases to trendy acronyms, our team has compiled a list of the most popular and hip slang terms that will have you feeling like part of the in-crowd. Get ready to take your vocabulary to the next level and start using these slang words to bring your squad closer than ever before!

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1. Squad up

This slang term refers to a group of friends or individuals coming together to form a team or hang out. It implies unity and camaraderie within the group.

  • For example, “Let’s squad up and dominate this game together.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to squad up with my friends for a night out.”
  • Another might post on social media, “Looking for people to squad up with for a road trip.”

2. Chillax

A combination of the words “chill” and “relax,” this slang term suggests taking it easy and enjoying each other’s company. It implies a laid-back and stress-free atmosphere when spending time together.

  • For instance, “Let’s just chillax and watch some movies.”
  • A person might say, “I need to chillax with my friends after a long week.”
  • Another might text their friends, “Anyone down to chillax at the park?”

This slang term means to meet or get together with someone. It can be used to plan a gathering or simply to express the desire to spend time with someone.

  • For example, “Let’s link up for lunch tomorrow.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while, we should link up soon.”
  • Another might text their friend, “Hey, let’s link up at the mall later.”

4. Kick it

To “kick it” means to spend time together in a casual and relaxed manner. It implies a sense of leisure and enjoyment when being in each other’s company.

  • For instance, “Let’s just kick it at my place and play video games.”
  • A person might say, “I miss kicking it with my friends at the beach.”
  • Another might text their friends, “Anyone down to kick it at the park?”

5. Roll deep

This slang term refers to going out or moving together in a large group. It implies strength in numbers and a sense of unity among the individuals.

  • For example, “We’re going to roll deep at the concert tonight.”
  • A person might say, “It’s always more fun to roll deep when going to parties.”
  • Another might text their friends, “Let’s roll deep and hit up the club.”

6. Ride or die

This phrase refers to someone who is always there for you, no matter what. It signifies unwavering loyalty and commitment.

  • For example, “She’s my ride or die. She’s been by my side through thick and thin.”
  • A person might say, “I need a ride or die friend who will always have my back.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “I want a partner who is my ride or die, someone I can count on in any situation.”

7. BFFs

This acronym stands for “Best Friends Forever” and is used to describe close friends who have a strong bond and are always there for each other.

  • For instance, “We’ve been BFFs since kindergarten. We do everything together.”
  • A person might say, “She’s not just my friend, she’s my BFF.”
  • When talking about plans, someone might say, “I’m going on vacation with my BFFs.”

8. Homies

This term is slang for close friends or companions. It is often used within certain communities or among individuals who share a strong bond.

  • For example, “I’m hanging out with my homies tonight.”
  • Someone might say, “My homies always have my back, no matter what.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, one might say, “I have a tight-knit group of homies who have been with me since high school.”

9. Crew

This term refers to a group of friends or teammates who share a common interest or goal. It signifies a sense of unity and teamwork.

  • For instance, “We’re going out with the crew tonight.”
  • A person might say, “My crew and I are training for a marathon together.”
  • When discussing a project, someone might say, “Our crew worked together to finish the job on time.”

10. Bros

This term is slang for close male friends or buddies. It is often used to describe a group of guys who have a strong bond and share common interests.

  • For example, “I’m going to watch the game with my bros.”
  • A person might say, “My bros are like family to me.”
  • When talking about support, someone might say, “My bros always have my back, no matter what.”

11. Sidekicks

Sidekicks are close friends or companions who are often seen together and provide support or assistance to each other. The term is commonly used to refer to a person who is always by someone’s side, helping them in their endeavors.

  • For example, Batman and Robin are famous sidekicks in the comic book world.
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Where are my sidekicks? We always hang out together.”
  • When describing a loyal friend, one might say, “He’s been my sidekick since we were kids.”

12. Wingmen

Wingmen are friends who assist and support someone in their romantic pursuits, often by providing social validation or helping to start conversations. The term is derived from the idea of a pilot’s wingman, who provides support and protection during aerial combat.

  • For instance, in a bar scene, a person might say, “I need a wingman to help me approach that group of people.”
  • When describing a friend’s role in a relationship, one might say, “He’s always been my wingman, boosting my confidence.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Will you be my wingman tonight at the party?”

13. Amigos

Amigos is a Spanish term for friends, often used in a casual and friendly context. The term has been adopted in English slang to refer to a close group of friends who spend a lot of time together.

  • For example, a person might say, “Hey amigos, let’s grab some food together.”
  • When introducing a group of friends, one might say, “These are my amigos, we’ve known each other since college.”
  • In a social gathering, someone might ask, “Where are my amigos? We always have a good time when we’re together.”

14. Pals

Pals are close friends or companions who enjoy spending time together and have a strong bond. The term is often used in an affectionate and informal manner to refer to friends who have known each other for a long time.

  • For instance, when greeting a friend, one might say, “Hey pal, long time no see!”
  • When describing a close friendship, someone might say, “We’ve been pals since childhood, and we’ve been through thick and thin.”
  • In a group of friends, a person might say, “Let’s go, pals! We have a lot of fun activities planned for today.”

15. Chums

Chums are close friends or companions who share a bond of camaraderie and enjoy each other’s company. The term is often used in a lighthearted and jovial manner to refer to friends who have a lot of fun together.

  • For example, when inviting a friend to hang out, one might say, “Hey chum, let’s grab a drink and catch up.”
  • When describing a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re a bunch of chums who love to go on adventures together.”
  • In a social gathering, a person might ask, “Where are my chums? We always have a blast when we’re all together.”

16. Buddies

This term refers to a group of friends who have a strong bond and spend a lot of time together. “Buddies” is a casual and affectionate way to refer to friends.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to the movies with my buddies tonight.”
  • In a conversation about childhood memories, someone might reminisce, “I used to ride bikes with my buddies every day after school.”
  • A friend might ask, “Hey, wanna grab lunch with the buddies tomorrow?”

17. Comrades

This term originated from the military and refers to individuals who serve together or share a common goal. “Comrades” often implies a sense of unity and camaraderie.

  • For instance, during a war movie, a soldier might shout, “We fight together, comrades!”
  • In a discussion about teamwork, someone might say, “When we work together, we’re not just colleagues, we’re comrades.”
  • A person might declare, “I consider all my teammates to be comrades.”

18. Allies

This term refers to individuals or groups who are united in a common cause or goal. “Allies” often implies a sense of support and cooperation.

  • For example, during a political rally, a speaker might say, “We must stand together with our allies to bring about change.”
  • In a conversation about social justice, someone might state, “We need to listen to the voices of marginalized communities and be their allies.”
  • A person might declare, “I consider myself an ally to the LGBTQ+ community.”

19. Partners

This term refers to individuals who work together or share responsibility for a task or project. “Partners” often implies a sense of equality and mutual trust.

  • For instance, in a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s discuss this further with our partners.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, a person might say, “My partner and I make decisions together.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you check this report with your partner before submitting it?”

20. Bros before hoes

This phrase is often used in a humorous or casual context to express the idea that friendships should take priority over romantic relationships. It suggests that friends should support and prioritize each other over their romantic partners.

  • For example, during a night out with friends, someone might jokingly say, “Remember, bros before hoes!”
  • In a conversation about relationships, a person might say, “I believe in the importance of friendship and always prioritize my bros.”
  • A friend might remind another, “Don’t forget, bros before hoes!”

21. Tribe

This term refers to a close-knit group of friends or people who share similar interests or values. It often implies a sense of loyalty and camaraderie within the group.

  • For example, “I love hanging out with my tribe. We always have each other’s backs.”
  • In a discussion about music, someone might say, “My tribe is really into indie rock.”
  • A person might post on social media, “Found my tribe at the comic book convention!”

22. Posse

This term refers to a group of friends or associates who hang out or work together. It often implies a sense of unity and support within the group.

  • For instance, “I’m going out with my posse tonight. It’s going to be a wild night!”
  • In a conversation about a team project, someone might say, “I have a great posse of colleagues who help me get things done.”
  • A person might post a group photo on social media with the caption, “My amazing posse never fails to have a good time!”

23. Squad goals

This term refers to the aspirations or achievements of a group of friends that others admire or aspire to have. It often represents a shared vision or common goals within the group.

  • For example, “Check out our vacation photos. #squadgoals”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “My squad goals include supporting each other through thick and thin.”
  • A person might post a picture of their squad accomplishing something together with the caption, “Living our best lives. #squadgoals”

24. Ride shotgun

This term originated from the days of stagecoaches, where the person sitting next to the driver would carry a shotgun for protection. In modern usage, it refers to sitting in the front passenger seat of a vehicle.

  • For instance, “I called shotgun, so I get to ride shotgun!”
  • In a carpool, someone might say, “Who wants to ride shotgun today?”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Can I ride shotgun on the way to the party?”

25. Wingman

This term originated from the aviation industry, where a wingman is a pilot who supports and protects the lead pilot. In social contexts, it refers to a person who helps, supports, or assists someone else, particularly in romantic or social situations.

  • For example, “I need a wingman tonight to help me talk to that person.”
  • In a conversation about dating, someone might say, “Having a good wingman can make all the difference.”
  • A person might ask their friend, “Can you be my wingman at the party tonight?”

26. Broski

This term is a combination of “bro” (short for brother) and the suffix “-ski” (a slang term used to add emphasis or create a sense of camaraderie). It is used to refer to a male friend or close companion.

  • For example, “Hey broski, want to grab some pizza?”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “I can always count on my broskis to have my back.”
  • When talking about a buddy, one might say, “He’s not just my friend, he’s my broski.”

27. Sis

Similar to “broski,” this term is a shortened form of “sister” and is used to refer to a female friend or close companion.

  • For instance, “Hey sis, let’s go shopping.”
  • When talking about a group of friends, someone might say, “I love hanging out with my sis squad.”
  • In a supportive conversation, one might say, “You’re not just my friend, you’re like a sis to me.”

28. Fam

Short for “family,” this term is used to refer to a group of people who are like family to each other. It can be used to describe a group of close friends or a tight-knit community.

  • For example, “What’s up, fam? Ready for the weekend?”
  • When talking about a group of friends, someone might say, “We’re not just friends, we’re fam.”
  • In a social media post, one might tag their group of friends and caption it, “My fam always has my back.”

29. Besties

This term is a slang abbreviation of “best friends” and is used to describe individuals who have a very close and special bond with each other.

  • For instance, “I’m going shopping with my besties this weekend.”
  • When introducing a friend, someone might say, “This is my bestie, we’ve known each other since kindergarten.”
  • In a heartfelt conversation, one might say, “I’m so grateful to have my besties by my side.”

30. Sidekick

Originally used to describe a close friend or partner who accompanies someone on adventures or missions, this term now refers to a trusted and reliable companion who is always by your side.

  • For example, “My sidekick and I are taking on the world together.”
  • When talking about a friend, someone might say, “He’s not just my buddy, he’s my sidekick.”
  • In a playful conversation, one might say, “You’re my sidekick, Batman to my Robin.”

31. Gang

A gang is a group of people who come together for a common purpose or activity, often involving illegal or criminal activities. It can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or associates.

  • For example, “They formed a gang to carry out the heist.”
  • In a neighborhood, you might hear, “Those kids are always hanging out together. They’re like a little gang.”
  • A person describing their friends might say, “We’re a tight-knit gang. We’ve been through thick and thin together.”

32. Pack

A pack refers to a close group of friends or associates who stick together and support each other. It can also be used to describe a group of people engaging in a specific activity or hobby.

  • For instance, “They’re my pack. We’ve been friends since childhood.”
  • A person describing their hiking group might say, “We’re a pack of nature enthusiasts.”
  • In a conversation about social dynamics, someone might say, “Humans are social animals. We naturally form packs.”

33. Clique

A clique is an exclusive group of people who share similar interests, backgrounds, or social status. They often stick together and may be seen as excluding others.

  • For example, “She’s part of the popular clique at school.”
  • In a workplace setting, someone might say, “The executives form a tight clique.”
  • A person describing their social circle might say, “We’re a clique of artists who support each other’s work.”

34. Unit

A unit refers to a close-knit group of people who work together or support each other. It can also be used to describe a group of friends or family members who are tightly bonded.

  • For instance, “They’re a unit. They always have each other’s backs.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “We trained as a unit and fought together.”
  • A person describing their childhood friends might say, “We grew up together and formed a strong unit.”

35. Clan

A clan refers to a close-knit family or a group of people who share a common ancestry or heritage. It can also be used to describe a group of friends or associates who are like family to each other.

  • For example, “They’re part of a large Irish clan.”
  • In a conversation about loyalty, someone might say, “We stick together like a clan.”
  • A person describing their group of friends might say, “We’re a tight-knit clan. We’ve known each other since college.”

36. Circle

In slang, “circle” is often used to refer to a group of people who are close or connected in some way. It can also imply a sense of exclusivity or loyalty within the group.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m part of a tight-knit circle of friends.”
  • A group of coworkers might refer to themselves as “the circle” within the office.
  • In a discussion about social dynamics, someone might mention, “It’s important to find your circle and surround yourself with positive influences.”

37. Hive

When used as slang, “hive” refers to a close-knit community or group of people who work together towards a common goal. It can also imply a sense of unity and cooperation within the group.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I love being part of the creative hive at my job.”
  • A group of fans might describe themselves as “the Beyhive,“the Beyhive,” showing their support and dedication to Beyoncé.
  • In a conversation about teamwork, someone might mention, “When everyone in the office works together, it’s like a hive of productivity.”

38. Band

In slang, “band” is often used to refer to a close group of friends or associates who spend a lot of time together. It can also imply a sense of camaraderie and shared experiences within the group.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going out with my band tonight.”
  • A group of musicians might refer to themselves as a “band,“band,” emphasizing their shared passion for music.
  • In a discussion about friendship, someone might mention, “Having a solid band of friends makes life more enjoyable.”

39. Coalition

When used as slang, “coalition” refers to a temporary or strategic partnership formed between different individuals or groups to achieve a specific goal. It can also imply a sense of collaboration and cooperation among the parties involved.

  • For instance, a person might say, “We formed a coalition to advocate for better environmental policies.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might mention, “The two parties formed a coalition to pass the new legislation.”
  • A group of organizations might collaborate on a project and refer to themselves as a “coalition” to highlight their joint efforts.
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40. Alliance

In slang, “alliance” refers to a close association or partnership between different individuals or groups. It can also imply a sense of mutual support and shared interests among the members of the alliance.

  • For example, a person might say, “We formed an alliance with other small businesses to negotiate better deals.”
  • In a discussion about gaming, someone might mention, “Joining an alliance in the game allows you to team up with other players.”
  • A group of activists might form an alliance to advocate for a common cause, such as social justice.

41. Union

This term refers to a group of individuals or organizations coming together for a common purpose or goal. It often implies a sense of unity and cooperation.

  • For example, “The union of different companies allowed for a stronger market presence.”
  • In a discussion about workers’ rights, someone might say, “Unions play a crucial role in advocating for fair treatment.”
  • A person describing a successful team might say, “Their union of skills and expertise led to impressive results.”

42. Fellowship

This word is often used to describe a friendly and supportive group of people who share common interests or goals. It can also refer to a formal association or organization.

  • For instance, “The fellowship of writers provided valuable feedback and encouragement.”
  • In a religious context, someone might say, “I found comfort in the fellowship of my church community.”
  • A person discussing a professional network might say, “Attending conferences allows for fellowship with colleagues in the field.”

43. Congregation

This term typically refers to a group of people who come together for a religious or social event. It can also be used more broadly to describe any gathering or assembly of individuals.

  • For example, “The congregation gathered for Sunday service at the church.”
  • In a discussion about protests, someone might say, “The congregation of activists marched through the streets.”
  • A person describing a family reunion might say, “The congregation of relatives enjoyed a day of laughter and reminiscing.”

44. Assembly

This word is often used to describe a formal gathering or meeting of people. It can also refer to the process of putting something together or building.

  • For instance, “The assembly of delegates discussed various proposals.”
  • In a discussion about manufacturing, someone might say, “The assembly of parts requires careful precision.”
  • A person describing a school event might say, “The assembly of students and faculty celebrated the achievements of the graduating class.”

45. Conglomerate

This term refers to a diverse collection or combination of different things or entities. It can also describe a large corporation made up of various subsidiaries or divisions.

  • For example, “The art exhibition featured a conglomerate of different artistic styles.”
  • In a discussion about business, someone might say, “The conglomerate acquired several smaller companies to expand its market presence.”
  • A person describing a music playlist might say, “The playlist is a conglomerate of different genres and artists.”

46. Collective

This term refers to a group of individuals who come together for a common purpose or goal. It emphasizes the idea of unity and collaboration.

  • For example, “The collective worked together to create a beautiful mural.”
  • In a discussion about community projects, someone might say, “We need a collective effort to make this happen.”
  • A person describing a team effort might say, “It was a collective effort to win the championship.”

47. Cohort

This term refers to a group of people who work together or share a common characteristic or experience. It emphasizes the idea of working together towards a common goal.

  • For instance, “The sales cohort worked together to meet their targets.”
  • In a discussion about a group project, someone might say, “Our cohort collaborated effectively to complete the assignment.”
  • A person describing a group of colleagues might say, “I enjoy working with my cohort at the office.”

48. Association

This term refers to a group of people who come together for a specific purpose or interest. It emphasizes the idea of belonging to a collective group.

  • For example, “The association promotes environmental conservation.”
  • In a discussion about professional groups, someone might say, “I joined the association to network with other professionals in my field.”
  • A person describing a club might say, “The association organizes regular events for its members.”

49. Society

This term refers to a group of individuals who share common values, interests, or culture. It emphasizes the idea of a collective identity.

  • For instance, “The society celebrates its cultural heritage through various events.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might say, “We need to address these problems as a society.”
  • A person describing a group of friends might say, “Our society of friends always supports each other.”

50. Network

This term refers to a group of individuals or organizations that are linked together through communication or relationships. It emphasizes the idea of interconnectedness.

  • For example, “The network of professionals helped me find a job.”
  • In a discussion about social media, someone might say, “I have a wide network of friends on Facebook.”
  • A person describing a group of business contacts might say, “My network of contacts has been instrumental in my career.”

51. Team up

To work together with others towards a common goal or objective. “Team up” is often used to describe joining forces with others to achieve something.

  • For example, in a video game, players might say, “Let’s team up and take down the boss.”
  • In a business setting, colleagues might decide to “team up” to tackle a challenging project together.
  • A group of friends planning a trip might say, “Let’s team up and book our flights and accommodations together.”

52. Join forces

To come together and work as a unified group or team. “Join forces” implies pooling resources, skills, or knowledge to achieve a common goal.

  • For instance, during a crisis, different organizations might “join forces” to provide relief and support.
  • In a sports context, teams might “join forces” to create a stronger team or to compete against a common opponent.
  • In a business merger, two companies might “join forces” to expand their market reach and capabilities.
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53. Band together

To form a close-knit group or alliance, often in response to a shared cause or purpose. “Band together” emphasizes the idea of solidarity and mutual support.

  • For example, during a natural disaster, communities might “band together” to help each other and rebuild.
  • In a social movement, individuals with a common goal might “band together” to advocate for change.
  • Friends facing a common challenge might decide to “band together” for support and encouragement.

54. Gather round

To come together in a group or circle. “Gather round” implies a physical gathering or meeting, often for a specific purpose or event.

  • For instance, at a campfire, someone might say, “Gather round, I have a story to share.”
  • In a classroom, a teacher might ask students to “gather round” for a group discussion.
  • During a family gathering, someone might suggest, “Let’s gather round and take a group photo.”

55. Unite

To join together or combine as one. “Unite” emphasizes the idea of bringing different individuals or groups together to form a cohesive whole.

  • For example, a political leader might call for people to “unite” for the greater good of the nation.
  • In a social movement, activists might strive to “unite” people from different backgrounds to fight for a common cause.
  • In a team sport, players must “unite” their efforts and work together to achieve victory.

56. Rally

To gather or unite for a common purpose or cause. “Rally” often refers to a group of people joining together to support or protest something.

  • For example, “The community rallied to raise funds for the local school.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “Let’s rally behind our candidate and show our support.”
  • During a crisis, a leader might urge, “We need to rally together and help each other through this difficult time.”

57. Pool resources

To combine or share resources, such as money, skills, or knowledge, for a common goal. “Pool resources” often implies a collaborative effort where individuals contribute what they can to achieve a shared objective.

  • For instance, “Let’s pool our resources and buy a new car together.”
  • In a business context, someone might suggest, “We should pool our resources to launch a new product.”
  • When planning an event, a group might decide, “Let’s pool our resources and make this party unforgettable.”

58. Merge

To combine or blend two or more things into a single entity. “Merge” can refer to the merging of companies, ideas, or even individuals working together towards a common goal.

  • For example, “The two companies decided to merge and create a stronger entity.”
  • In a creative context, someone might say, “Let’s merge our ideas and come up with something truly unique.”
  • When collaborating on a project, a team might decide, “Let’s merge our skills and create something amazing.”

59. Collaborate

To work jointly or cooperate with others on a project or task. “Collaborate” implies a shared effort and the exchange of ideas and skills to achieve a common objective.

  • For instance, “Let’s collaborate on this presentation and combine our expertise.”
  • In a creative field, someone might suggest, “We should collaborate on a song and bring our different styles together.”
  • When working on a group project, a student might say, “Let’s collaborate and divide the tasks to finish on time.”

60. Cooperate

To work together willingly and actively towards a common goal. “Cooperate” suggests a willingness to compromise and contribute towards the success of the collective.

  • For example, “We need to cooperate and follow the rules to maintain a harmonious community.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “Let’s cooperate and share our workload to meet the deadline.”
  • When playing a team sport, a coach might emphasize, “We need to cooperate and communicate on the field to win the game.”

61. Converge

When things or people come together at a specific point or in a specific way.

  • For example, “The different storylines in the movie converge at the end.”
  • In a discussion about different opinions, someone might say, “Let’s converge our ideas and find a solution.”
  • A person describing a group project might say, “We need to converge our efforts to meet the deadline.”

62. Fuse

To combine or blend together to form a single entity.

  • For instance, “The flavors of the spices fuse together to create a delicious dish.”
  • In a conversation about different music genres, someone might say, “This song fuses elements of rock and hip-hop.”
  • A person describing a successful partnership might say, “Our skills and expertise fuse together to create a strong team.”

63. Cohere

To stay together or be united despite differences or challenges.

  • For example, “The team members need to cohere and work towards a common goal.”
  • In a discussion about family values, someone might say, “Family members should cohere and support each other.”
  • A person describing a group of friends might say, “We’ve been through ups and downs, but we always manage to cohere.”

64. Amalgamate

To combine or unite multiple things or ideas into one.

  • For instance, “The two companies amalgamated to form a stronger entity.”
  • In a conversation about different cultures, someone might say, “This dish is an amalgamation of various culinary traditions.”
  • A person describing a collaborative project might say, “We need to amalgamate our resources and expertise to achieve success.”

65. Consolidate

To gather or combine things or people into a single, stronger entity.

  • For example, “The company aims to consolidate its various departments to improve efficiency.”
  • In a discussion about personal finances, someone might say, “Consolidating your debts can help you manage them more effectively.”
  • A person describing a political movement might say, “We need to consolidate our efforts and work towards a common goal.”

66. Synthesize

To combine different elements or ideas to create something new or unique. “Synthesize” often refers to the process of merging separate components into a cohesive whole.

  • For example, in a music production context, a producer might say, “I need to synthesize these different sounds to create a catchy melody.”
  • In a scientific discussion, a researcher might explain, “We aim to synthesize new compounds with improved properties.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might say, “We need to synthesize everyone’s ideas to come up with the best solution.”

67. Harmonize

To bring different elements or people into agreement or accord. “Harmonize” often implies finding a balance or blending different perspectives or interests.

  • For instance, in a musical context, a singer might say, “Let’s harmonize our voices to create a beautiful chorus.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “We need to harmonize our efforts to achieve a common goal.”
  • A person discussing relationships might advise, “In order to have a healthy partnership, both individuals need to harmonize their wants and needs.”

68. Coalesce

To come together or unite to form a larger whole. “Coalesce” implies a merging or blending of separate entities or ideas.

  • For example, in a political context, someone might say, “Different parties need to coalesce in order to form a strong coalition.”
  • In a scientific discussion, a researcher might explain, “The separate particles coalesce to form a larger droplet.”
  • A person discussing friendships might say, “Our shared interests and values allowed us to coalesce into a tight-knit group.”

69. Integrate

To combine or bring together different parts or elements to form a whole. “Integrate” often implies a process of assimilating or blending separate components into a unified entity.

  • For instance, in a business context, a manager might say, “We need to integrate our new employees into the existing team.”
  • In a technological context, someone might explain, “The software is designed to integrate seamlessly with existing systems.”
  • A person discussing social issues might argue, “We need to integrate different perspectives and experiences to create a more inclusive society.”

70. Conjoin

To join or combine two or more things together. “Conjoin” often implies a close or intimate connection between the elements being joined.

  • For example, in a romantic context, someone might say, “Two souls conjoined in love.”
  • In a linguistic context, a grammarian might explain, “In this sentence, two independent clauses are conjoined by a coordinating conjunction.”
  • A person discussing teamwork might say, “We need to conjoin our skills and strengths to achieve our common objective.”

71. Meld

To combine or mix together harmoniously. “Meld” is often used to describe the process of merging different elements or ideas into a cohesive whole.

  • For example, in a team meeting, someone might say, “Let’s meld our ideas to create a stronger proposal.”
  • A chef might describe a dish as, “A perfect melding of flavors.”
  • In a creative project, a designer might aim to “meld different styles to achieve a unique aesthetic.”

72. Assemble

To bring together or collect into one place or group. “Assemble” is commonly used to describe the act of gathering people or objects in order to form a unified whole.

  • For instance, a teacher might instruct their students, “Please assemble in the auditorium for the assembly.”
  • A project manager might say, “Let’s assemble the necessary materials and resources for the upcoming presentation.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order their troops to “assemble at the designated rally point.”

73. Consort

To join or associate with others. “Consort” often implies a close or intimate connection between individuals or groups.

  • For example, a musician might say, “I had the opportunity to consort with some of the greatest jazz artists of our time.”
  • In a social setting, someone might introduce their friends as, “These are my trusted consorts.”
  • In a business context, a company might choose to “consort with other industry leaders to expand their market reach.”

74. Cluster

To gather or form a closely-knit group or collection. “Cluster” is often used to describe a dense or concentrated grouping of objects or individuals.

  • For instance, a scientist might study a “cluster of stars” in a specific region of the galaxy.
  • In a city, there might be a “cluster of restaurants” in a popular neighborhood.
  • A teacher might divide their students into “clusters” for group work or discussions.
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75. Affiliate

To connect or align oneself with a group or organization. “Affiliate” implies a formal or official connection, often through membership or partnership.

  • For example, a blogger might say, “I am proud to affiliate with this brand and promote their products.”
  • A nonprofit organization might have “affiliated chapters” in different cities or regions.
  • In the business world, companies might “affiliate with industry leaders to enhance their reputation and reach.”

76. Unify

To unify means to bring together different elements or groups to form a cohesive whole. It implies the act of joining or merging separate entities into one.

  • For example, a political leader might say, “We need to unify the country and work towards a common goal.”
  • In a team meeting, a manager might say, “Let’s unify our efforts and collaborate on this project.”
  • A social activist might advocate for unity by saying, “It’s important for communities to unify and support each other in times of crisis.”

77. Amass

Amass refers to the act of gathering or collecting a large quantity of something. It implies the accumulation or aggregation of objects, resources, or people.

  • For instance, a business owner might say, “We need to amass enough funds to launch our new product.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might mention, “He was able to amass a fortune through smart investments.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team has been able to amass a talented roster of players.”

78. Congregate

Congregate means to gather or come together in a specific location or place. It implies the act of assembling or meeting in a particular setting.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please congregate in the auditorium for the assembly.”
  • In a religious context, a priest might say, “Let us congregate in the church for Sunday service.”
  • A tour guide might instruct a group, “Please congregate near the entrance before we start the tour.”

79. Coop up

Coop up refers to the act of confining or restricting someone or something to a small or limited space. It implies keeping someone or something confined or isolated.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “Don’t coop up the kids indoors all day. Let them play outside.”
  • In a conversation about travel restrictions, someone might mention, “The pandemic has cooped up many people in their homes.”
  • A pet owner might say, “I feel bad cooping up my dog in the apartment all day. I should take him for a walk.”