Top 51 Slang For For Example – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to adding flair to your sentences, using slang for “for example” can make your point pop. Whether you’re a seasoned wordsmith or just looking to spice up your writing, we’ve got you covered with a list of trendy phrases that will take your examples to the next level. Join us as we explore the coolest ways to say “for example” and elevate your language game!

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1. E.g.

Short for the Latin phrase “exempli gratia,” e.g. is used to introduce one or more examples that illustrate a statement. It is commonly used in academic and formal writing.

  • For instance, “I enjoy outdoor activities, e.g., hiking and camping.”
  • In a cooking recipe, you might find, “Add your favorite vegetables, e.g., carrots and broccoli.”
  • A teacher might explain, “You need to bring your school supplies, e.g., pens, notebooks, and textbooks.”

2. Ex.

A shortened form of “example,” ex. is used in a similar way to e.g. It is commonly used in informal writing and is often found in lists or bullet points.

  • For example, “Here are a few ex. of healthy snacks: carrots, apples, and almonds.”
  • In a presentation, you might see, “Important factors for success include dedication, discipline, and motivation, ex. John Smith.”
  • An article about fashion trends might state, “Popular colors this season include pastels, ex. light pink and mint green.”

3. For instance

This phrase is used to introduce a specific example that supports or clarifies a statement. It is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For instance, “I enjoy outdoor activities, for instance, hiking and camping.”
  • In a conversation about different cuisines, someone might say, “Italian food is known for its pasta dishes, for instance, spaghetti and lasagna.”
  • A teacher might give an explanation like, “You need to bring your school supplies, for instance, pens, notebooks, and textbooks.”

4. Such as

This phrase is used to introduce one or more examples that are similar to or are part of a larger category. It is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For example, “I enjoy outdoor activities, such as hiking and camping.”
  • In a discussion about fruits, someone might say, “Citrus fruits, such as oranges and lemons, are high in vitamin C.”
  • A writer might explain, “To be successful in business, you need skills such as communication, leadership, and problem-solving.”

5. Like

Like is a versatile word that can be used to introduce examples, comparisons, or similes. It is commonly used in both formal and informal writing.

  • For instance, “I enjoy outdoor activities, like hiking and camping.”
  • In a conversation about animals, someone might say, “Cats are carnivorous, like lions and tigers.”
  • A poet might use a simile like, “Her smile was bright, like the morning sun.”

6. As an example

This phrase is used to introduce an example or to provide further clarification.

  • For example, “As an example, let’s say you’re learning a new language.”
  • In a discussion about different types of cars, someone might say, “As an example, a sedan is a popular choice for families.”
  • A teacher might explain, “As an example, let’s solve this math problem together.”

7. As a case in point

This phrase is used to emphasize a particular example that supports a point being made.

  • For instance, “As a case in point, consider this study that shows the negative effects of smoking.”
  • In a debate about climate change, someone might say, “As a case in point, look at the recent extreme weather events.”
  • A manager might explain, “As a case in point, let me share a success story from one of our previous clients.”

8. To illustrate

This phrase is used to show or explain something in a clear and visual way.

  • For example, “To illustrate my point, let’s use a graph to represent the data.”
  • In a presentation about a new product, someone might say, “To illustrate the benefits, let me show you a before and after comparison.”
  • A writer might use this phrase to enhance a description, “To illustrate the scene, imagine a golden sunset over a tranquil lake.”

9. To give an example

This phrase is used to offer a specific example to support or explain a statement.

  • For instance, “To give an example, consider this scenario where technology has improved communication.”
  • In a discussion about different types of food, someone might say, “To give an example, pizza is a popular choice for many people.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you give an example of a simile?”

10. In particular

This phrase is used to single out a particular example or detail from a larger context.

  • For example, “In particular, I want to highlight the importance of regular exercise.”
  • In a conversation about travel destinations, someone might say, “In particular, I recommend visiting the Grand Canyon.”
  • A chef might explain, “In particular, I use fresh herbs to enhance the flavors of my dishes.”

11. Namely

This term is used to introduce something more specific or to provide a specific example.

  • For instance, “There are several reasons why I love living in the city, namely the diverse food options.”
  • In a discussion about different types of sports, someone might say, “There are many popular sports, namely basketball, soccer, and tennis.”
  • An article about famous musicians might mention, “Several iconic artists have come out of the 80s, namely Madonna, Michael Jackson, and Prince.”

12. By way of illustration

This phrase is used to introduce an example that helps clarify or support a statement.

  • For example, “By way of illustration, let’s consider a scenario where two cars are racing.”
  • In a presentation about environmental issues, a speaker might say, “By way of illustration, let’s look at the impact of deforestation on wildlife.”
  • A teacher explaining a math problem might say, “By way of illustration, let’s solve a similar equation first.”

13. As a demonstration

This phrase is used to introduce an example or action that serves as a demonstration or proof of something.

  • For instance, “As a demonstration, let me show you how to properly tie a knot.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, the chef might say, “As a demonstration, I will now chop the vegetables.”
  • A trainer in a fitness class might say, “As a demonstration, I’ll show you the correct form for this exercise.”

14. By way of example

This phrase is used to introduce an example that supports or provides further explanation.

  • For example, “By way of example, let’s consider a situation where someone is trying to quit smoking.”
  • In a debate about the benefits of exercise, someone might say, “By way of example, studies have shown that regular physical activity can reduce the risk of chronic diseases.”
  • An article about successful entrepreneurs might mention, “By way of example, Steve Jobs and Bill Gates started their companies from humble beginnings.”

15. For one

This phrase is used to introduce one example or instance of something.

  • For instance, “I love traveling to different countries. For one, I enjoy experiencing new cultures.”
  • In a discussion about the benefits of exercise, someone might say, “Regular physical activity has many advantages, for one, it improves cardiovascular health.”
  • A person explaining the importance of recycling might say, “Recycling helps reduce waste and conserve resources. For one, it reduces the need for raw materials.”

16. To be specific

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for specific and detailed information in order to clarify a point or example.

  • For instance, “When describing your experience, please be specific about the dates and locations.”
  • In a discussion about favorite movies, someone might say, “I love action movies, to be specific, the ones with lots of explosions.”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “In your essays, remember to provide evidence and examples to be specific.”

17. As an instance

This phrase is used to introduce a specific example or instance that illustrates a point or supports an argument.

  • For example, “Some people enjoy outdoor activities, as an instance, hiking or camping.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “In the case of climate change, as an instance, the melting of polar ice caps is a clear indication.”
  • A presenter might use this phrase to introduce a visual aid, “As an instance, let’s look at this graph that shows the increase in sales over the past year.”

18. To demonstrate

This phrase is used to indicate the act of showing or proving something through examples, evidence, or actions.

  • For instance, “I will demonstrate how to solve this math problem step by step.”
  • In a science experiment, someone might say, “The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the effects of temperature on plant growth.”
  • A chef might demonstrate a cooking technique by saying, “Watch closely as I demonstrate how to properly julienne a carrot.”

19. To show

This phrase is used to indicate the act of presenting or displaying something to others.

  • For example, “Let me show you how to use this new app.”
  • In a presentation, someone might say, “This graph shows the correlation between income and education.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Can you show me your work to prove how you arrived at that answer?”

20. To clarify

This phrase is used to indicate the act of making something clear or understandable by providing additional information or examples.

  • For instance, “To clarify, I meant the blue shirt, not the red one.”
  • In a discussion about a confusing topic, someone might say, “I just want to clarify the main points before we move on.”
  • A writer might add a footnote to their article to clarify a specific term or concept.
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21. To make it clear

This phrase is used to emphasize or clarify a point by giving a specific example or explanation.

  • For instance, “To make it clear, let’s look at a specific scenario.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “To make it clear, let me give you an example.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “To make it clear, here’s what I mean.”

22. As a representation

This phrase is used to present something as an example or representation of a larger concept or idea.

  • For example, “As a representation, this painting captures the essence of the artist’s style.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “As a representation of our society, this policy reflects our values.”
  • A teacher might explain, “As a representation of a chemical reaction, this equation demonstrates the process.”

23. To exemplify

This phrase is used to show or illustrate something by providing a specific example.

  • For instance, “To exemplify, let’s consider a real-life scenario.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “To exemplify good leadership, let’s look at the actions of this CEO.”
  • A writer might use this phrase in an essay, saying, “To exemplify this point, I will provide a case study.”

24. As a sample

This phrase is used to present something as a sample or instance of a larger category or concept.

  • For example, “As a sample, this article represents the type of content we publish.”
  • In a research study, a scientist might say, “As a sample, we collected data from 100 participants.”
  • A chef might explain, “As a sample of our menu, we offer a tasting plate with a selection of our dishes.”

25. To indicate

This phrase is used to suggest or show something as an example or indication of a larger idea or concept.

  • For instance, “To indicate, let’s examine the data.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “To indicate a trend, let’s look at these graphs.”
  • During a discussion, someone might say, “To indicate a problem, we can analyze the symptoms.”

26. To call attention to

This phrase is used to bring attention to a specific topic or point of interest.

  • For example, “Let me call attention to this important detail in the report.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “I want to call attention to the success of our recent marketing campaign.”
  • A teacher might use this phrase to say, “I’d like to call attention to the excellent work done by our student of the month.”

27. To bring to light

This phrase is used when something was previously unknown or hidden and is now being made public or brought to people’s attention.

  • For instance, “The investigation brought to light new evidence in the case.”
  • A journalist might write, “The report brings to light the corruption within the government.”
  • A historian might say, “This discovery brings to light a previously unknown aspect of ancient civilization.”

28. To shed light on

This phrase is used to explain or provide information that helps to clarify a situation or topic.

  • For example, “The expert’s research sheds light on the causes of climate change.”
  • A professor might say, “This lecture will shed light on the historical context of the novel.”
  • A scientist might present, “Our study aims to shed light on the mechanisms behind this rare disease.”

29. To make clear

This phrase is used to explain or simplify a concept or idea so that it is easily comprehended.

  • For instance, “Let me make it clear that we do not tolerate discrimination in this company.”
  • A presenter might say, “I want to make it clear that this product is not intended for children.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Let me make it clear that late assignments will not be accepted.”

30. To elucidate

This word is used to explain or clarify a complex or confusing topic, making it easier to understand.

  • For example, “The professor used diagrams to elucidate the concept of quantum mechanics.”
  • A writer might say, “The article aims to elucidate the benefits of a plant-based diet.”
  • A speaker might elaborate, “I will now elucidate on the historical context of this famous painting.”

31. To show by way of example

This phrase is used to indicate that the following example is being used to illustrate a point or support an argument.

  • For instance, “To show by way of example, let’s consider a hypothetical scenario.”
  • In a persuasive essay, a writer might use this phrase to introduce evidence, saying, “To show by way of example, statistics have shown a decrease in crime rates.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might say, “To show by way of example, let’s look at a case study from a successful company.”

32. As proof

This phrase is used to present something as evidence or support for a statement or argument.

  • For example, “As proof of his innocence, he presented a video recording.”
  • In a debate, someone might say, “As proof, I have here a document that confirms my claim.”
  • A scientist presenting research findings might state, “As proof of our hypothesis, we conducted multiple experiments with consistent results.”

33. As an illustration

This phrase is used to introduce an example that serves as a visual representation or demonstration of a concept or idea.

  • For instance, “As an illustration, let’s look at a diagram that shows the structure of a cell.”
  • During a lecture, a professor might say, “As an illustration, here’s a graph that depicts the population growth over time.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might use this phrase to introduce a slide, saying, “As an illustration, here are some photos that illustrate the impact of climate change.”

34. For one thing

This phrase is used to introduce one specific example among others that support a statement or argument.

  • For example, “For one thing, exercise has been shown to improve mental health.”
  • In a discussion about the benefits of reading, someone might say, “For one thing, reading helps improve vocabulary.”
  • During a debate, a debater might use this phrase to introduce a point, saying, “For one thing, stricter gun control laws have been proven to reduce gun violence.”

35. Take, for example

This phrase is used to introduce a specific example that serves as an illustration or evidence for a point being made.

  • For instance, “Take, for example, the case of a successful entrepreneur who started with nothing.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of education, someone might say, “Take, for example, the story of a high school dropout who went on to become a successful CEO.”
  • During a presentation, a speaker might use this phrase to introduce a real-life scenario, saying, “Take, for example, a situation where a company faced a major crisis and successfully recovered.”

36. For a case in point

This phrase is used to introduce a specific example that supports or proves a point. It is commonly used in formal writing or discussions.

  • For a case in point, consider the recent success of the company’s marketing campaign.
  • When discussing the benefits of exercise, the trainer mentioned, “For a case in point, just look at the transformation of this client.”
  • In a debate about the importance of renewable energy, a speaker might say, “For a case in point, let’s examine the positive impact of solar power.”

37. For a demonstration

This phrase is used to introduce an example or action that demonstrates or shows how something works or is done. It is often used in instructional or explanatory contexts.

  • For a demonstration, the chef showed the audience how to properly chop an onion.
  • When explaining the benefits of a new software feature, the presenter said, “For a demonstration, let me show you how it works.”
  • In a science class, the teacher might say, “For a demonstration, let’s mix these two chemicals and observe the reaction.”

38. For a proof

This phrase is used to introduce evidence or an example that serves as proof or support for a statement or argument. It is commonly used in formal or academic settings.

  • For a proof, the researcher conducted a series of experiments to validate the hypothesis.
  • When discussing the impact of climate change, the scientist presented data and said, “For a proof, look at the rising global temperatures.”
  • In a court case, the lawyer might say, “For a proof, we have multiple eyewitness testimonies and video footage.”

39. For an illustration

This phrase is used to introduce an example or explanation that serves to clarify or make something more understandable. It is often used in educational or explanatory contexts.

  • For an illustration, the teacher drew a diagram on the board to show the different parts of a plant.
  • When explaining a complex concept, the professor said, “For an illustration, let’s consider the behavior of particles in a vacuum.”
  • In a presentation about historical events, the speaker might say, “For an illustration, let’s look at this timeline of important dates.”

40. For one instance

This phrase is used to introduce a particular example that represents or exemplifies a larger concept or situation. It is commonly used in discussions or arguments.

  • For one instance, consider the case of a student who went from failing to achieving top grades through hard work.
  • When discussing the negative effects of smoking, the doctor mentioned, “For one instance, smoking increases the risk of lung cancer.”
  • In a debate about the benefits of technology, a participant might say, “For one instance, smartphones have revolutionized communication and access to information.”

41. By way of instance

This is a phrase used to introduce an example or illustration to further explain a point. It is a more formal alternative to “for example”.

  • By way of instance, “Many fruits, such as apples, bananas, and oranges, are high in vitamin C.”
  • In a scientific report, a researcher might write, “By way of instance, the experiment was conducted in a controlled environment.”
  • A teacher might explain, “By way of instance, let’s look at the following equation to understand the concept better.”

42. i.e.

This abbreviation is used to provide further clarification or explanation of a previous statement. It is derived from the Latin phrase “id est” which means “that is”.

  • For example, “I love citrus fruits, i.e., oranges, lemons, and grapefruits.”
  • In a legal document, it might state, “The defendant shall be sentenced to community service, i.e., 100 hours of volunteer work.”
  • A writer might use it in a sentence like, “I prefer action movies, i.e., movies with intense car chases and explosions.”

43. for example

This is a commonly used phrase to introduce an example or illustration to support a statement. It is often abbreviated as “e.g.” which stands for “exempli gratia”.

  • For example, “Many animals, for example, dogs and cats, make great pets.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “We offer a variety of products, for example, smartphones, tablets, and laptops.”
  • A teacher might give an instruction like, “Complete the following sentence: My favorite hobby is _______, for example, painting or playing sports.”

44. to make it evident

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for clarity or understanding. It implies the intention to provide a clear and obvious example or explanation.

  • For instance, “I will provide a detailed explanation to make it evident how the system works.”
  • In a debate, a participant might say, “Let me present a strong argument to make it evident why this policy should be implemented.”
  • A presenter might state, “I will use visual aids to make it evident how our product can benefit you.”

45. to make it apparent

This phrase is used to indicate the intention of providing a clear and obvious example or explanation to ensure understanding.

  • For example, “I will demonstrate the process step by step to make it apparent how it works.”
  • In a scientific research paper, a researcher might write, “The results of the experiment make it apparent that there is a correlation between the variables.”
  • A teacher might say, “I will use real-life examples to make it apparent why this concept is important.”

46. to make it obvious

When explaining a concept, a teacher might say, “Let me give you an example to make it obvious.”

  • In a discussion about a complicated topic, someone might ask, “Can you break it down further to make it obvious?”
  • A presenter might use visual aids to make it obvious to the audience.
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47. to make it explicit

In a conversation, someone might say, “I just want to make it explicit that I disagree with your point.”

  • When giving instructions, a teacher might say, “I’ll make it explicit that you need to complete the assignment by Friday.”
  • A manager might make it explicit that employees are expected to arrive on time.

48. to make it manifest

In a religious context, someone might pray to make it manifest that they are seeking divine intervention.

  • When discussing a goal, someone might say, “I’m taking action to make it manifest.”
  • A person might meditate to make it manifest their desires.

49. to make it understandable

When explaining a complex concept, a teacher might say, “I’ll break it down to make it understandable.”

  • In a conversation, someone might say, “Can you simplify it to make it understandable?”
  • A writer might use relatable examples to make it understandable to readers.

50. to make it comprehensible

In a presentation, a speaker might use charts and graphs to make it comprehensible to the audience.

  • When giving directions, someone might say, “I’ll use landmarks to make it comprehensible.”
  • A teacher might use analogies to make it comprehensible for students.

51. to make it lucid

This phrase is used to emphasize the need to clarify or explain something in a way that is easily comprehensible.

  • For instance, in a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me give you an example to make it lucid.”
  • In a conversation, someone might ask, “Can you please elaborate on that point to make it lucid?”
  • A teacher might instruct their students, “Try to simplify your explanations to make it lucid for everyone to understand.”