Top 26 Slang For Wealthy – Meaning & Usage

The world of the wealthy is filled with its own set of exclusive slang and terminology that can be both intriguing and mystifying to outsiders. Join us as we uncover some of the most popular and intriguing slang used by the affluent and elite. From terms that signify luxury to phrases that symbolize opulence, this listicle is your gateway to understanding and embracing the language of the wealthy. Get ready to elevate your lexicon and delve into the world of the rich and famous!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Loaded

Loaded is a slang term used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy. It implies that the person has a significant amount of money or resources at their disposal.

  • For example, “He’s so loaded, he bought a mansion and a yacht.”
  • In a discussion about extravagant spending, someone might say, “Only the loaded can afford to fly in private jets.”
  • A person might envy someone’s wealth and say, “I wish I were as loaded as that guy.”

2. Filthy rich

Filthy rich is a slang term used to describe someone who is extremely wealthy. It emphasizes the abundance of wealth and often implies that the person’s wealth was acquired through questionable or unethical means.

  • For instance, “He’s filthy rich, he owns multiple luxury cars and a private island.”
  • In a conversation about wealth inequality, someone might say, “The filthy rich keep getting richer while the rest of us struggle.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “I wouldn’t mind being filthy rich and never having to work again.”

3. Well-off

Well-off is a slang term used to describe someone who is financially comfortable or relatively wealthy. It suggests that the person has enough money to live comfortably and afford some luxuries.

  • For example, “They’re well-off enough to travel the world and dine at fancy restaurants.”
  • In a discussion about financial security, someone might say, “I want to be well-off enough to retire early.”
  • A person might describe their own financial situation as, “I’m not rich, but I’m well-off enough to afford a nice house.”

4. Affluent

Affluent is a slang term used to describe someone who is wealthy or prosperous. It implies a high social and economic status and often suggests that the person has a significant amount of disposable income.

  • For instance, “They live in an affluent neighborhood with large mansions and expensive cars.”
  • In a conversation about luxury brands, someone might say, “Affluent individuals often purchase designer clothing and accessories.”
  • A person might aspire to become affluent and say, “I’m working hard to build a successful business and become affluent.”

5. Deep pockets

Deep pockets is a slang term used to describe someone who has a lot of money or financial resources. It suggests that the person can easily afford expensive purchases or investments.

  • For example, “He has deep pockets and can afford to buy a sports car without hesitation.”
  • In a discussion about charitable donations, someone might say, “People with deep pockets can make a significant impact through philanthropy.”
  • A person might envy someone’s financial stability and say, “I wish I had deep pockets like them.”

6. Wealthy

This term refers to someone who has a lot of money or is financially well-off. It implies that the person has a significant amount of wealth or resources at their disposal.

  • For example, “He’s so wealthy, he can afford to buy a mansion and a yacht.”
  • In a conversation about successful entrepreneurs, someone might say, “Elon Musk is incredibly wealthy, thanks to his ventures.”
  • A person might joke, “If I were wealthy, I’d buy my own private island and live there.”

7. Moneyed

This term describes someone who has a lot of money or is in a financially privileged position. It suggests that the person has access to a significant amount of wealth or resources.

  • For instance, “She comes from a moneyed family and has never had to worry about finances.”
  • In a discussion about luxury lifestyles, someone might say, “The moneyed elite often have access to exclusive clubs and experiences.”
  • A person might comment, “Living a moneyed life doesn’t necessarily guarantee happiness or fulfillment.”

8. Prosperous

This term describes someone who is financially successful and has a comfortable standard of living. It suggests that the person is doing well financially and has achieved a level of prosperity.

  • For example, “He built a prosperous business empire and enjoys the fruits of his labor.”
  • In a conversation about economic growth, someone might say, “A prosperous society benefits everyone, not just the wealthy.”
  • A person might note, “Being well-off doesn’t necessarily mean one is free from financial stress or worries.”

9. Well-to-do

This term describes someone who is affluent or belongs to the higher social and economic class. It suggests that the person has a significant amount of wealth and enjoys a privileged lifestyle.

  • For instance, “She comes from a well-to-do family and has always had access to the finer things in life.”
  • In a discussion about income inequality, someone might say, “The well-to-do often have advantages and opportunities that others don’t.”
  • A person might comment, “Being part of the upper class doesn’t automatically make someone happy or fulfilled.”

10. Rich as Croesus

This phrase refers to someone who is extremely wealthy and has a vast amount of money or resources. It implies that the person is incredibly rich and perhaps even excessively so.

  • For example, “He inherited a fortune and is now as rich as Croesus.”
  • In a conversation about extravagant lifestyles, someone might say, “The filthy rich can afford to buy anything they desire.”
  • A person might jokingly comment, “If I were as rich as Croesus, I’d swim in a pool of money like Scrooge McDuck.”

11. Rolling in it

This phrase is used to describe someone who has a lot of money or is very wealthy. It implies that the person has so much money that they are figuratively “rolling” in it.

  • For example, “He just bought a mansion and a yacht. He’s rolling in it.”
  • A person might say, “I wish I could be rolling in it like Bill Gates.”
  • In a discussion about wealth, someone might comment, “If I won the lottery, I’d be rolling in it for the rest of my life.”

12. Cashed up

This slang term refers to someone who has a large amount of cash or is financially well-off. It implies that the person is able to spend money freely without worrying about their financial situation.

  • For instance, “After winning the jackpot, she was completely cashed up.”
  • A person might say, “I’m feeling pretty cashed up after getting a big bonus at work.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, someone might comment, “I wish I could be permanently cashed up.”

13. Moneyed up

This phrase is used to describe someone who is wealthy or rich. It implies that the person has a significant amount of money or financial resources.

  • For example, “He comes from a moneyed up family.”
  • A person might say, “I need to find a job that will get me moneyed up.”
  • In a discussion about the lifestyles of the rich and famous, someone might comment, “They’re all moneyed up and living the high life.”

14. Flush

This slang term describes someone who has a lot of money or is financially well-off. It implies that the person has plenty of money and is not in a financially precarious situation.

  • For instance, “He’s flush with cash after his successful business venture.”
  • A person might say, “I feel flush right now after getting a big raise.”
  • In a conversation about financial security, someone might comment, “I wish I could always be flush and never worry about money.”

15. Money to burn

This phrase is used to describe someone who has a large amount of money and can afford to spend it freely without any concerns. It implies that the person has so much money that they can afford to waste or burn it without any negative consequences.

  • For example, “After winning the lottery, he had money to burn.”
  • A person might say, “If I were a millionaire, I would have money to burn.”
  • In a discussion about extravagant spending, someone might comment, “Celebrities have money to burn on luxury items.”

16. Stinking rich

This term is used to describe someone who is very wealthy, often implying that their wealth is so great that it is almost offensive or excessive.

  • For example, “That celebrity is stinking rich, with multiple mansions and luxury cars.”
  • In a discussion about wealth inequality, one might say, “The stinking rich continue to accumulate more wealth while others struggle to make ends meet.”
  • A person might joke, “If I win the lottery, I’ll be stinking rich and retire on a private island.”

17. Posh

This term is used to describe someone or something that is associated with wealth, sophistication, and high social status.

  • For instance, “She lives in a posh neighborhood with gated mansions.”
  • In a conversation about fine dining, one might say, “I had dinner at a posh restaurant last night.”
  • A person might comment, “His posh lifestyle is evident in his designer clothes and expensive hobbies.”

18. Bigwig

This term is used to describe someone who holds a high-ranking position or has significant power and influence.

  • For example, “The bigwig of the company made the final decision on the project.”
  • In a discussion about politics, one might say, “The bigwigs in Washington are the ones who make the laws.”
  • A person might comment, “She’s a bigwig in the fashion industry, with her own clothing line and fashion shows.”

19. Upper crust

This term is used to describe the wealthiest and most privileged members of society, often referring to the upper class or elite.

  • For instance, “The upper crust attend exclusive parties and live in luxurious estates.”
  • In a conversation about social hierarchy, one might say, “Only the upper crust have access to certain private clubs and prestigious schools.”
  • A person might comment, “Her family comes from the upper crust, with generations of wealth and power.”

20. Minted

This term is used to describe someone who is financially well-off or has a significant amount of money.

  • For example, “He’s minted, driving around in his sports car and wearing designer clothes.”
  • In a discussion about inheritance, one might say, “She was born into a minted family and never had to worry about money.”
  • A person might comment, “If I win the lottery, I’ll be minted and travel the world.”

21. Silk stocking

This term is used to describe a person who is extremely wealthy or comes from a wealthy background. It refers to someone who can afford to wear expensive silk stockings.

  • For example, “She’s a real silk stocking, always shopping at high-end boutiques.”
  • In a conversation about social classes, someone might say, “The silk stockings of society have no idea what it’s like to struggle.”
  • A person might use this term sarcastically, saying, “Oh, look at Mr. Silk Stocking over there, flaunting his wealth.”

22. Magnate

A magnate is a person who has achieved great wealth and power in a particular industry or business. They are often seen as influential figures and leaders in their field.

  • For instance, “He’s a real estate magnate, owning multiple properties across the country.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, someone might say, “Elon Musk is a tech magnate, revolutionizing the automotive and space industries.”
  • A person might use this term to describe someone with significant influence, saying, “She’s a media magnate, controlling multiple news outlets.”

23. Oligarch

An oligarch is a member of a small, privileged group of individuals who hold significant wealth and power. They often have control over important aspects of society, such as politics or the economy.

  • For example, “The country is ruled by a group of oligarchs who control everything.”
  • In a conversation about income inequality, someone might say, “The oligarchs continue to amass wealth while the majority of the population struggles.”
  • A person might use this term to criticize the concentration of power and wealth, saying, “The oligarchs have no regard for the common people.”

24. Money magnet

A money magnet is a person who seems to effortlessly attract wealth and financial success. They have a natural ability to make money and are often seen as lucky or fortunate.

  • For instance, “He’s a real money magnet, always stumbling upon lucrative opportunities.”
  • In a discussion about financial strategies, someone might say, “To become a money magnet, you need to adopt a positive mindset and attract abundance.”
  • A person might use this term to describe someone who is always successful in their financial endeavors, saying, “She’s a money magnet, everything she touches turns to gold.”

25. Well-fixed

Well-fixed is a term used to describe someone who is financially secure or well-off. It implies that the person has enough money to live comfortably and does not have to worry about financial difficulties.

  • For example, “He comes from a well-fixed family, never having to worry about money.”
  • In a conversation about personal finance, someone might say, “It’s important to save and invest wisely to become well-fixed.”
  • A person might use this term to describe their own financial situation, saying, “I’m well-fixed, I don’t have to stress about bills or expenses.”

26. Rolling in dough

This phrase is used to describe someone who has a lot of money or is financially well-off. It implies that the person is so wealthy that they are figuratively swimming in dough, or money.

  • For example, “After winning the lottery, John is now rolling in dough.”
  • A person might say, “I wish I could be rolling in dough like those celebrities.”
  • Another might comment, “She inherited a fortune from her parents, so she’s been rolling in dough ever since.”
See also  Top 35 Slang For More Ghetto – Meaning & Usage