Top 55 Slang For General – Meaning & Usage

General slang is like a secret language that can make you feel in the loop or totally lost. We’ve got your back with a curated list of the top slang words and phrases that are making waves in everyday conversations. Stay ahead of the game and impress your friends with this essential guide to the latest lingo!

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1. Boss

This term is used to refer to someone who is in charge or has authority over others. It can be used to describe a person’s superior or someone who is in control of a situation.

  • For example, in a workplace, someone might say, “I need to check with my boss before making any decisions.”
  • In a group project, a team member might ask, “Who’s the boss here? Who’s in charge?”
  • A person might describe a successful individual as a “boss” by saying,“boss” by saying, “She’s a boss in her field, always making things happen.”

2. Chief

This slang term is used to refer to someone who is in a position of leadership or authority. It can be used to describe a person’s superior or someone who is respected and looked up to.

  • For instance, in a military setting, a soldier might address their commanding officer as “chief.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “I need to run this idea by the chief before implementing it.”
  • A person might describe someone who is knowledgeable and experienced as a “chief” by saying,“chief” by saying, “He’s the chief when it comes to fixing cars.”

3. Big cheese

This slang term is used to describe someone who is important or influential in a particular field or situation. It can be used to refer to a person who holds a high position or has a lot of power.

  • For example, in a company, someone might say, “The big cheese is coming to visit our office today.”
  • In a social setting, a person might describe someone who is popular and well-known as the “big cheese.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a successful entrepreneur by saying, “He’s the big cheese in the tech industry.”

This slang term is used to refer to the person who is in charge or the top authority in a particular situation or organization. It can be used to describe someone who holds a high-ranking position or has a lot of influence.

  • For instance, in a business setting, someone might say, “The head honcho is making the final decision on this project.”
  • In a sports team, a player might refer to their coach as the “head honcho.”
  • A person might describe someone who is the ultimate decision-maker as the “head honcho” by saying,“head honcho” by saying, “He’s the head honcho around here. Nothing happens without his approval.”

5. Top dog

This slang term is used to describe the person who has the highest authority or status in a particular situation or group. It can be used to refer to someone who is at the top of the hierarchy or someone who is considered the best or most successful.

  • For example, in a competition, the winner might be referred to as the “top dog.”
  • In a company, someone might say, “He’s the top dog in this industry. Everyone looks up to him.”
  • A person might describe themselves as the “top dog” by saying,“top dog” by saying, “I’m the top dog when it comes to sales. No one can beat my numbers.”

6. Bigwig

This term is used to describe someone who holds a high-ranking or influential position, often in a company or organization. It suggests that the person has power and authority.

  • For example, “The bigwig of the company made an announcement about the new project.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The bigwigs in Washington are discussing the new policy.”
  • A person might use this term sarcastically, saying, “Oh, look at the bigwig who thinks they’re so important.”

7. Big shot

Similar to “bigwig,” this term refers to someone who holds a position of importance or influence. It suggests that the person has achieved success and is well-respected.

  • For instance, “He’s a big shot in the music industry, with many successful albums.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The big shots in the company are meeting to discuss the future strategy.”
  • A person might use this term sarcastically, saying, “Oh, Mr. Big Shot thinks he can do whatever he wants.”

8. Main man

This term is used to refer to someone who is a close friend or a trusted confidant. It suggests that the person is reliable and can be counted on.

  • For example, “He’s my main man, always there to support me.”
  • In a team setting, someone might say, “Our coach is our main man, guiding us to victory.”
  • A person might use this term affectionately, saying, “Thanks for being my main man, I don’t know what I’d do without you.”

9. Big kahuna

This term is often used in a lighthearted or playful manner to refer to someone who holds a position of importance or influence. It suggests that the person is highly regarded or has a lot of power.

  • For instance, “The big kahuna of the company is visiting our office today.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “He’s the big kahuna of the party, always making sure everyone has a good time.”
  • A person might use this term jokingly, saying, “I’m just the big kahuna of my own little world.”

10. Big enchilada

This term is used to refer to someone who is in a position of authority or leadership. It suggests that the person has control or influence over a situation.

  • For example, “The big enchilada of the organization made the final decision.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “Let’s get the big enchilada’s approval before moving forward.”
  • A person might use this term humorously, saying, “I’m just the big enchilada of my own kitchen.”

11. Big fish

This term refers to someone who holds a position of power or influence. It is often used to describe someone who is highly respected or has a lot of authority.

  • For example, in a corporate setting, someone might say, “The CEO is the big fish around here.”
  • In a political context, a journalist might write, “The senator is seen as a big fish in his party.”
  • A person might say, “I’m trying to impress the big fish at the networking event.”

12. Big wheel

Similar to “big fish,” this term is used to describe someone who has a lot of power or influence. It suggests that the person is important and has a significant impact on a particular situation or group of people.

  • For instance, in a business setting, someone might say, “The CEO is the big wheel of the company.”
  • In a social context, a person might say, “She’s the big wheel in our friend group.”
  • A journalist might write, “He’s a big wheel in the music industry, with connections to top artists.”

13. Top brass

This term refers to the highest-ranking officials in a particular organization or group. It is often used to describe military officers or executives in a company.

  • For example, in a military context, someone might say, “The top brass made the decision to deploy more troops.”
  • In a corporate setting, a person might say, “The top brass at the company are discussing a potential merger.”
  • A journalist might write, “The top brass of the organization held a meeting to address the recent controversy.”

14. Gen

This abbreviation is short for “general” and is often used in military contexts. It refers to a high-ranking officer in the army or a person in a position of authority.

  • For instance, in a military setting, someone might say, “The gen gave the order to advance.”
  • In a discussion about military strategy, a person might say, “The gen’s plan was to flank the enemy.”
  • A historian might write, “The gen’s leadership was crucial in winning the battle.”

15. G

This slang term is short for “general” and is often used as a casual way to refer to a person in a position of authority or importance.

  • For example, in a workplace setting, someone might say, “I need to talk to the g about this issue.”
  • In a social context, a person might say, “The g of the party is arriving soon.”
  • A student might say, “I have a meeting with the g of the university tomorrow.”

16. Main

Refers to something that is the most important or significant.

  • For example, “What’s the main reason for your decision?”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might ask, “What’s the main plot of the story?”
  • A teacher might say, “Pay attention to the main points in the lecture.”

17. Overall

Refers to the entirety or the complete picture of something.

  • For instance, “What is your overall opinion of the book?”
  • In a sports analysis, someone might say, “The team’s overall performance was impressive.”
  • A reviewer might comment, “The overall experience at the restaurant was excellent.”

18. Broad

Refers to something that encompasses a wide range or variety.

  • For example, “He has a broad knowledge of different subjects.”
  • In a discussion about career options, someone might say, “There are broad opportunities in the tech industry.”
  • A teacher might explain, “We will cover a broad range of topics in this course.”

19. Universal

Refers to something that is applicable or relevant to everyone or everything.

  • For instance, “The desire for love and happiness is universal.”
  • In a discussion about human rights, someone might argue, “Freedom of speech is a universal right.”
  • A philosopher might ponder, “Are there universal truths that apply to all cultures?”

20. Common

Refers to something that occurs often or is widely seen or experienced.

  • For example, “It is common for people to experience stress.”
  • In a discussion about food preferences, someone might say, “Pizza is a common favorite.”
  • A doctor might explain, “The common cold is caused by a viral infection.”

21. Standard

This term refers to something that is considered to be the average or usual level of quality or performance.

  • For example, “That car meets the standard safety requirements.”
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “The curriculum follows the standard guidelines.”
  • A person reviewing a restaurant might comment, “The food was good, but the service was just standard.”

22. Regular

This word is used to describe something that occurs or happens frequently or is considered to be the usual or normal occurrence.

  • For instance, “I’m a regular at that coffee shop.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, someone might say, “I go to the gym on a regular basis.”
  • A person discussing their work schedule might say, “I have regular hours from Monday to Friday.”

23. Typical

This term is used to describe something that is characteristic or representative of a particular type or category.

  • For example, “That behavior is typical of a toddler.”
  • In a discussion about weather, someone might say, “It’s typical for this region to have hot summers.”
  • A person describing a movie might comment, “The plot is typical of a romantic comedy.”

24. Ordinary

This word is used to describe something that is common, average, or not special or extraordinary.

  • For instance, “It’s just an ordinary day.”
  • In a conversation about talent, someone might say, “He has an ordinary singing voice.”
  • A person discussing their job might say, “I have an ordinary office job.”

25. All-around

This term describes someone or something that is versatile or well-rounded, capable in many different areas or aspects.

  • For example, “He’s an all-around athlete, excelling in multiple sports.”
  • In a discussion about a musician, someone might say, “She’s an all-around talent, playing multiple instruments and singing.”
  • A person describing a friend might comment, “He’s an all-around great guy, always willing to help others.”

26. Across-the-board

This term is used to describe something that applies to everyone or everything in a particular group or situation.

  • For example, “We need to make across-the-board budget cuts to reduce expenses.”
  • In a discussion about a new company policy, someone might say, “We need to implement changes that have an across-the-board impact.”
  • A sports commentator might say, “The team needs to improve across-the-board to have a chance at winning the championship.”

27. Comprehensive

This word is used to describe something that includes or covers all aspects or elements of a particular subject or topic.

  • For instance, “The report provides a comprehensive analysis of the market trends.”
  • In a review of a book, someone might say, “The author presents a comprehensive overview of the topic.”
  • A student might say, “I need to study for a comprehensive exam that covers the entire semester’s material.”

28. Inclusive

This term is used to describe something that aims to include or involve everyone, regardless of their background, identity, or abilities.

  • For example, “The company promotes an inclusive work environment where everyone feels valued.”
  • In a discussion about diversity, someone might say, “We need to create inclusive spaces that embrace different perspectives.”
  • A teacher might say, “Our classroom is an inclusive environment where every student is welcome and respected.”

29. Global

This word is used to describe something that relates to or affects the entire world or a significant part of it.

  • For instance, “The company has a global presence with offices in multiple countries.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “We need to take global action to address this issue.”
  • A news headline might read, “Global leaders gather to discuss economic challenges.”

30. Whole

This term is used to describe something that is complete or fully formed, without any missing parts or elements.

  • For example, “The whole team worked together to achieve the victory.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might say, “We need to consider the whole picture before making a decision.”
  • A chef might say, “The secret to a delicious dish is using fresh ingredients and balancing all the flavors.”

31. Complete

When something is finished or finalized.

  • For example, “I just completed my final exam.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to complete this project and move on to the next one.”
  • Another might say, “The renovation is finally complete, and the house looks amazing.”

32. Total

Referring to the entirety or the whole of something.

  • For instance, “The total cost of the project was $10,000.”
  • A person might say, “The total number of attendees was 200.”
  • Another might say, “The total distance covered in the race was 26.2 miles.”

33. Full

Having all the necessary or expected parts or elements.

  • For example, “I ate a full meal before going to the movie.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe I missed the full presentation.”
  • Another might say, “The full impact of the storm was devastating.”

34. Entire

Referring to the whole or complete entity of something.

  • For instance, “The entire team celebrated the victory.”
  • A person might say, “I read the entire book in one sitting.”
  • Another might say, “The entire city was affected by the power outage.”

35. Absolute

Used to emphasize the completeness or extremeness of something.

  • For example, “I have absolute confidence in my abilities.”
  • A person might say, “That was an absolute disaster.”
  • Another might say, “She has absolute control over the situation.”

36. Thorough

When something is described as thorough, it means that it is complete, comprehensive, and detailed. It implies that no aspect or detail has been left out.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Make sure you study the material thoroughly before the exam.”
  • A manager might ask an employee, “Did you do a thorough analysis of the data?”
  • A reviewer might write, “The author provides a thorough examination of the topic, leaving no stone unturned.”

37. Extensive

When something is described as extensive, it means that it covers a large area or includes a wide range of things. It implies that there is a lot of quantity or variety involved.

  • For instance, a traveler might say, “I’ve had extensive experience exploring different cultures.”
  • A researcher might state, “We conducted an extensive study on the effects of climate change.”
  • A journalist might write, “The article provides extensive coverage of the political situation.”

38. In-depth

When something is described as in-depth, it means that it is thorough and detailed, often going into great depth or detail about a particular subject.

  • For example, a journalist might conduct an in-depth interview with a prominent figure.
  • A student might say, “I need to do some in-depth research on this topic.”
  • A book reviewer might write, “The author provides an in-depth analysis of the characters and their motivations.”

39. Full-scale

When something is described as full-scale, it means that it is done on a large or complete scale, without any limitations or restrictions.

  • For instance, a company might launch a full-scale advertising campaign to promote a new product.
  • A military operation might be described as a full-scale invasion.
  • A project manager might say, “We need to conduct a full-scale review of our processes.”

40. Full-blown

When something is described as full-blown, it means that it has reached its maximum or most intense level. It implies that it is complete or fully developed.

  • For example, a party might turn into a full-blown celebration with music, dancing, and decorations.
  • A disease might progress from mild symptoms to a full-blown illness.
  • A conflict might escalate into a full-blown war.
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41. Full-fledged

This term is used to describe something that is fully developed or has reached its full potential.

  • For example, “After years of training, he finally became a full-fledged lawyer.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait until I become a full-fledged adult and have more independence.”
  • In a discussion about careers, someone might mention, “She’s a full-fledged doctor now, after completing her residency.”

42. All-encompassing

This term is used to describe something that includes or covers everything or everyone.

  • For instance, “The all-encompassing report covered every aspect of the project.”
  • A person might say, “Her love for music is all-encompassing; she listens to every genre.”
  • In a discussion about a comprehensive policy, someone might mention, “The new regulations are designed to be all-encompassing and address all potential issues.”

43. All-embracing

This term is used to describe something that includes or accepts everything or everyone.

  • For example, “The all-embracing philosophy promotes acceptance and understanding.”
  • A person might say, “Her all-embracing attitude makes her a great leader.”
  • In a discussion about a diverse community, someone might mention, “We strive to create an all-embracing environment where everyone feels welcome.”

44. All-inclusive

This term is used to describe something that includes or covers everything or everyone.

  • For instance, “The all-inclusive package includes accommodations, meals, and activities.”
  • A person might say, “We offer an all-inclusive membership that grants access to all our facilities.”
  • In a discussion about a comprehensive policy, someone might mention, “The new regulations aim to be all-inclusive and address all potential scenarios.”

45. All-round

This term is used to describe someone or something that is versatile or well-rounded in various aspects or skills.

  • For example, “He’s an all-round athlete who excels in multiple sports.”
  • A person might say, “She’s an all-round talent, with skills in singing, dancing, and acting.”
  • In a discussion about a versatile tool, someone might mention, “This Swiss Army knife is an all-round tool that can handle various tasks.”

46. Blanket

This term is used to describe something that includes or affects everything within a certain area or category. It implies a broad and comprehensive scope.

  • For example, “The new policy will have blanket coverage across all departments.”
  • A person might say, “The storm caused blanket damage to the entire neighborhood.”
  • In a discussion about regulations, one might argue, “We need blanket rules that apply to all businesses in order to maintain fairness.”

47. Collective

This term refers to a group of individuals working together or sharing a common interest or goal. It emphasizes the idea of unity and collaboration.

  • For instance, “The success of the project was a result of the collective effort of the team.”
  • A person might say, “We need to make decisions as a collective in order to move forward.”
  • In a discussion about social movements, one might argue, “The power of collective action can bring about real change.”

48. Encyclopedic

This term describes a person or resource that has a vast amount of knowledge or information on a wide range of topics. It implies a depth of understanding and expertise.

  • For example, “He has an encyclopedic knowledge of history.”
  • A person might say, “Her book is like an encyclopedic guide to cooking.”
  • In a discussion about a professor, one might say, “He is known for his encyclopedic understanding of literature.”

49. Panoramic

This term is used to describe a wide or comprehensive view of a scene or situation. It implies a broad perspective that encompasses multiple aspects.

  • For instance, “The panoramic view from the top of the mountain was breathtaking.”
  • A person might say, “We need to take a panoramic approach to solving this problem.”
  • In a discussion about photography, one might argue, “A panoramic shot can capture the entire landscape in one image.”

50. Sweeping

This term refers to something that affects or includes a large number of people, places, or things. It implies a wide and comprehensive range.

  • For example, “The new legislation has sweeping implications for the entire industry.”
  • A person might say, “Her speech made sweeping generalizations about an entire group.”
  • In a discussion about changes, one might argue, “We need sweeping reforms to address the systemic issues.”

51. Worldwide

Refers to something that is present or happens all over the world. It indicates a global reach or impact.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Worldwide protests against climate change.”
  • A person discussing a popular song might say, “That song became a worldwide hit.”
  • Another might comment, “The pandemic has had a worldwide effect on travel and tourism.”

52. Generalized

Means to describe something in a general or broad way, without going into specific details or nuances.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He gave a generalized overview of the topic.”
  • In a discussion about stereotypes, someone might mention, “The portrayal of the character was quite generalized.”
  • A teacher might advise, “Avoid making generalized statements without providing evidence or examples.”

53. Generic

Refers to something that lacks unique or distinct characteristics. It can also mean something that is common or widely available.

  • For example, a person might say, “I prefer specific brands, not generic ones.”
  • In a discussion about medication, someone might mention, “The generic version of the drug is much cheaper.”
  • A person might comment, “The movie had a very generic plot and characters.”

54. Commonplace

Describes something that is ordinary, common, or unremarkable. It refers to things that are frequently encountered or experienced.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The use of smartphones has become commonplace.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might mention, “That style was once unique but is now quite commonplace.”
  • A person might comment, “The idea of self-driving cars is becoming more commonplace.”

55. Big gun

Refers to someone who holds a position of power, influence, or authority. It can also refer to someone who is highly skilled or talented in a particular field.

  • For example, a person might say, “She’s a big gun in the advertising industry.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might mention, “The candidate has the support of several big guns.”
  • A person might comment, “We need to bring in the big guns to solve this problem.”