Top 36 Slang For Formulate – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ideas and putting thoughts into words, having the right slang can make all the difference. Formulate your language game with our curated list of trendy phrases and expressions that will take your communication skills to the next level. Let us guide you through the latest slang for formulate and help you stay ahead of the curve in the ever-evolving world of language.

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Cook up

To “cook up” means to create or invent something, often in a creative or imaginative way.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I’m going to cook up a new story idea.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might suggest, “Let’s cook up some fresh ideas for the new project.”
  • A chef might say, “I’m going to cook up a new recipe using unique ingredients.”

2. Whip up

To “whip up” means to make something quickly or easily, often referring to food or drinks.

  • For instance, a bartender might say, “I can whip up a delicious cocktail in no time.”
  • A cook might say, “I’ll whip up a quick dinner using leftovers.”
  • Someone hosting a gathering might say, “I’ll whip up some appetizers for the party.”

3. Dream up

To “dream up” means to imagine or conceive something, often in a creative or fantastical way.

  • For example, an artist might say, “I dreamt up this surreal painting.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m trying to dream up a unique plot for my next novel.”
  • A child might say, “I dreamt up a magical world in my imagination.”

4. Brew up

To “brew up” can mean to create or cause trouble or to concoct something, often referring to a plan or scheme.

  • For instance, someone might say, “They’re brewing up trouble with their latest scheme.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “They’re brewing up a plan to gain more power.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Let’s brew up a plan to surprise our friend for their birthday.”

5. Hash out

To “hash out” means to discuss or resolve a problem or issue through extensive conversation or negotiation.

  • For example, a team might say, “We need to hash out the details of our project.”
  • Two friends might say, “Let’s hash out our disagreement and find a solution.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “We need to hash out the terms of the contract before finalizing it.”

6. Piece together

To gather information or evidence from various sources in order to form a coherent understanding or explanation. The phrase “piece together” is often used when trying to solve a puzzle or mystery.

  • For example, a detective might say, “We need to piece together the clues to solve this case.”
  • When discussing a complex issue, someone might suggest, “Let’s piece together all the facts before making any conclusions.”
  • In a conversation about a historical event, a historian might explain, “Through extensive research, we were able to piece together what really happened.”

7. Craft

To carefully and skillfully create or design something. “Craft” can refer to the act of formulating an idea or plan with intention and precision.

  • For instance, an artist might say, “I spent hours crafting this painting.”
  • When discussing a well-written article, someone might comment, “The author clearly crafted each sentence with care.”
  • In a conversation about a business strategy, a consultant might explain, “We crafted a detailed plan to maximize efficiency and growth.”

8. Draft

To create a preliminary version or plan of something, typically in written form. “Draft” can refer to the process of formulating ideas and organizing them into a structured format.

  • For example, a writer might say, “I need to draft an outline for my next article.”
  • When discussing a proposal, someone might suggest, “Let’s draft a rough plan before presenting it to the team.”
  • In a conversation about a new policy, a government official might explain, “We’re currently drafting legislation to address this issue.”

9. Concoct

To create or devise something, often by combining various elements or ideas. “Concoct” is often used when referring to the creation of a plan, story, or recipe.

  • For instance, a chef might say, “I concocted a new recipe using unexpected ingredients.”
  • When discussing a conspiracy theory, someone might comment, “They concocted a wild story to explain their actions.”
  • In a conversation about a fictional world, an author might explain, “I spent months concocting the intricate details of this fantasy realm.”

10. Cook something up

To create or invent something, often with the intention of deceiving or misleading others. “Cook something up” is a colloquial phrase used to describe the act of formulating a plan or story, especially when it involves dishonesty.

  • For example, a politician might be accused of “cooking up” false evidence to support their claims.
  • When discussing a scandal, someone might say, “They cooked up a scheme to defraud investors.”
  • In a conversation about a fictional alibi, a detective might explain, “The suspect cooked up a story to cover their tracks.”

11. Dream something up

To dream something up means to come up with an idea or plan, often in a creative or imaginative way.

  • For example, “I dreamt up a new concept for a novel last night.”
  • A team brainstorming session might involve everyone trying to dream up innovative solutions.
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “We need to dream up a unique selling proposition.”

12. Whip something up

To whip something up means to quickly create or prepare something, often in a skillful or efficient manner.

  • For instance, “I can whip up a delicious dinner in just 20 minutes.”
  • A chef might say, “I’ll whip up a special dessert for you.”
  • In a discussion about crafting, someone might mention, “I can whip up a beautiful handmade card in no time.”

13. Hash something out

To hash something out means to discuss and resolve a problem or disagreement, often through thorough or intense communication.

  • For example, “We need to hash out the details of the contract.”
  • In a team meeting, members might hash out different ideas before reaching a decision.
  • A couple might say, “Let’s sit down and hash out our differences.”

14. Brew something up

To brew something up means to create or develop something, especially a plan or scheme, often with a hint of secrecy or intrigue.

  • For instance, “He brewed up a plan to take over the company.”
  • In a conversation about starting a business, someone might say, “I’m brewing up a new marketing strategy.”
  • A group of friends might brew up a surprise party for someone.
See also  Top 0 Slang For Imagine – Meaning & Usage

15. Piece something together

To piece something together means to figure out or assemble something from various parts or clues, often in a detective-like manner.

  • For example, “She pieced together the mystery from the scattered evidence.”
  • A puzzle enthusiast might say, “I love piecing together jigsaw puzzles.”
  • In a discussion about history, someone might mention, “Historians piece together the past through documents and artifacts.”

16. Create

To bring something into existence or to cause something to happen. “Create” can refer to the act of making or producing something new.

  • For example, an artist might say, “I love to create beautiful paintings.”
  • A writer might say, “I create stories that transport readers to different worlds.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “Let’s create a marketing plan to promote our new product.”

17. Develop

To work on or improve something over time. “Develop” often implies a process of growth or progress.

  • For instance, a software developer might say, “I’m currently developing a new app.”
  • A scientist might say, “We’re developing a cure for a rare disease.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’m developing my skills in photography.”

18. Design

To create a plan or blueprint for something. “Design” often refers to the process of creating something with a specific purpose or function in mind.

  • For example, an architect might say, “I design buildings that are both functional and aesthetically pleasing.”
  • A graphic designer might say, “I design logos for businesses.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might say, “I design clothing that reflects my personal style.”

19. Construct

To assemble or create something by combining various parts or materials. “Construct” often implies a physical act of building or creating.

  • For instance, a construction worker might say, “We’re constructing a new bridge.”
  • An engineer might say, “We’re constructing a prototype for a new machine.”
  • In a DIY context, someone might say, “I’m constructing a bookshelf using reclaimed wood.”

20. Form

To give structure or organization to something. “Form” can refer to the act of creating or shaping something.

  • For example, a sculptor might say, “I use clay to form beautiful sculptures.”
  • A musician might say, “I’m working on forming a band.”
  • In a social context, someone might say, “Let’s form a committee to address this issue.”

21. Invent

To invent means to create or come up with something new. It is often used to describe the process of developing a new idea, product, or solution.

  • For example, “Thomas Edison invented the light bulb.”
  • A person might say, “I need to invent a new way to solve this problem.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might mention, “Steve Jobs was known for his ability to invent innovative products.”

22. Imagine

To imagine means to form a mental image or concept of something that is not currently present or real. It is often used to describe the process of visualizing or envisioning something in the mind.

  • For instance, “Close your eyes and imagine a beautiful beach.”
  • A person might say, “I can imagine how amazing it would be to travel the world.”
  • In a conversation about creativity, someone might suggest, “Let’s imagine a world where anything is possible.”

23. Plan

To plan means to organize or make arrangements in advance for a future event or action. It involves setting goals, determining steps, and allocating resources to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “We need to plan our vacation itinerary.”
  • A person might say, “I have a detailed plan for my career.”
  • In a discussion about project management, someone might mention, “A well-executed plan is crucial for success.”

24. Scheme

To scheme means to devise a secret or clever plan, often with the intention of gaining an advantage or achieving a particular outcome. It is commonly used to describe a cunning or crafty strategy.

  • For instance, “The villain schemed to steal the valuable artifact.”
  • A person might say, “I have a scheme to get out of work early.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might discuss, “The politician’s scheme to gain more power.”

25. Cook

To cook means to prepare or manipulate something, often in a creative or skillful way. While it can refer to the literal act of cooking food, it is also used figuratively to describe the process of manipulating or altering something to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For example, “She is cooking a delicious meal in the kitchen.”
  • A person might say, “I need to cook up a plan to solve this issue.”
  • In a discussion about creativity, someone might suggest, “Let’s cook up some new ideas.”

26. Dream

In the context of formulating, “dream” is a slang term used to refer to an idea or concept.

  • For example, “I had this dream for a new product that could revolutionize the industry.”
  • In a brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s come up with some fresh dreams for our next project.”
  • A creative individual might share, “I’m always chasing after new dreams to bring to life.”

27. Whip

To “whip” something up is to create or formulate it quickly and skillfully.

  • For instance, “I can whip up a new recipe in no time.”
  • In a design meeting, someone might say, “Let’s whip together some mock-ups for the client.”
  • A writer might boast, “I can whip out an article in just a few hours.”

28. Hash

In the context of formulating, “hash” is a slang term used to mean analyze or break down a problem or concept.

  • For example, “Let’s hash out the details of this project before moving forward.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might say, “We need to hash through all the possible solutions.”
  • A strategist might suggest, “We should hash the data to identify patterns and trends.”

29. Brew

To “brew” something is to develop or formulate it, often with a sense of patience and careful consideration.

  • For instance, “We need to brew a new marketing strategy for this product.”
  • In a product development meeting, someone might say, “Let’s brew up some ideas for the next iteration.”
  • A scientist might explain, “This experiment needs time to brew before we can draw any conclusions.”

30. Piece

In the context of formulating, “piece” is a slang term used to refer to an idea or concept.

  • For example, “I’ve got a great piece for a new business venture.”
  • In a creative session, someone might say, “Let’s share our best pieces and see what we can build.”
  • A thinker might ponder, “I’ve been mulling over a piece that could change the world.”

31. Devise

To devise means to come up with or create a plan, idea, or solution to a problem. It often implies using creativity or ingenuity to formulate something.

  • For example, a team might devise a new marketing strategy to increase sales.
  • A writer might devise a plot twist to keep readers engaged in a story.
  • In a brainstorming session, participants might devise different ways to solve a problem.
See also  Top 21 Slang For Curious – Meaning & Usage

32. Sculpt

To sculpt means to shape or mold something, often with careful attention to detail. In the context of formulating, it can refer to carefully crafting or designing something.

  • For instance, an artist might sculpt a sculpture out of clay.
  • A designer might sculpt a character for a video game.
  • In a metaphorical sense, a speaker might sculpt their words to convey a specific message.

33. Blueprint

To blueprint means to plan or lay out the details of something. It implies creating a detailed plan or outline as a guide for the formulation of a project or idea.

  • For example, an architect might blueprint a building before construction begins.
  • A project manager might blueprint the steps and timeline for completing a project.
  • In a business context, a company might blueprint its goals and strategies for the upcoming year.

34. Engineer

To engineer means to design or create something, often with a focus on functionality or efficiency. In the context of formulating, it can refer to designing a solution or system.

  • For instance, an engineer might engineer a new technology to solve a problem.
  • A software developer might engineer a software program.
  • In a broader sense, a person might engineer their life to achieve their goals.

35. Plan out

To plan out means to carefully map or outline the details of something. It implies creating a comprehensive plan or strategy for the formulation of a project or idea.

  • For example, a wedding planner might plan out the timeline and logistics of a wedding.
  • A teacher might plan out a lesson plan for a semester.
  • In a personal context, a person might plan out their daily schedule to optimize productivity.

36. Sketch out

To sketch out something means to create a rough plan or outline for it. It can be used in a variety of contexts.

  • For instance, a designer might say, “Let me sketch out a few ideas for the new logo.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “Why don’t we sketch out a timeline for the project?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Before writing your essay, make sure to sketch out an outline of your main points.”