Top 53 Slang For Keeping – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying in the loop with the latest lingo, keeping up with slang for keeping can be a challenge. But fear not, our team has done the hard work for you. We’ve rounded up the trendiest phrases and expressions that will have you sounding like a language pro in no time. Stay tuned for the ultimate guide to mastering the art of modern communication!

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1. Hold onto

This phrase means to keep or retain something, often in a possessive or protective manner. It implies a sense of not letting go or allowing something to slip away.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Hold onto your dreams and never give up.”
  • In a discussion about personal belongings, someone might advise, “Hold onto your wallet in crowded areas.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Hold onto my hand while we cross the street.”

2. Hang onto

Similar to “hold onto,” this phrase means to keep or retain something. It suggests a sense of holding tightly or not letting go, often in a metaphorical sense.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “Hang onto the ball and don’t fumble.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might advise, “Hang onto the people who truly care about you.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience, “Hang onto hope even in the darkest of times.”

3. Preserve

This term refers to the act of keeping something in its original state or preventing it from being damaged, altered, or destroyed. It implies a sense of protection and conservation.

  • For example, a chef might say, “Preserve the freshness of the ingredients by storing them properly.”
  • In a discussion about historical artifacts, someone might emphasize, “It’s important to preserve these artifacts for future generations.”
  • A nature enthusiast might advocate for preserving wildlife habitats, stating, “We must take action to preserve these endangered species.”

4. Secure

To secure something means to make it safe, protected, or free from harm or danger. It suggests taking measures to ensure the continued possession or existence of something.

  • For instance, a homeowner might say, “Secure your valuables by installing a home security system.”
  • In a conversation about data privacy, someone might advise, “Secure your online accounts with strong passwords and two-factor authentication.”
  • A military officer might give the command, “Secure the perimeter and maintain constant vigilance.”

5. Maintain

This term means to keep something in a particular state or condition, often through regular upkeep or attention. It implies a sense of continuous effort to prevent deterioration or decline.

  • For example, a car mechanic might say, “Regular maintenance is essential to maintain the performance of your vehicle.”
  • In a discussion about personal health, someone might emphasize, “Maintain a balanced diet and exercise regularly.”
  • A gardener might advise, “Water and fertilize your plants regularly to maintain their growth and health.”

6. Guard

To guard something means to protect or keep it safe from harm or theft. In slang, it can refer to keeping something secure or watching over it.

7. Retain

To retain something means to keep it or hold onto it. In slang, it can refer to keeping something for a long period of time or not getting rid of it.

8. Store

To store something means to keep it in a designated place for future use or safekeeping. In slang, it can refer to keeping something in a specific location or storing a large quantity of something.

9. Hoard

To hoard something means to accumulate or collect a large amount of it, often without any intention of using or sharing it. In slang, it can refer to keeping a large quantity of something.

10. Stockpile

To stockpile something means to gather or accumulate a large supply of it, often in preparation for future use or emergencies. In slang, it can refer to keeping a large quantity of something for a specific purpose.

11. Save

To keep something in its current state and prevent it from being lost or destroyed. The term “save” can also refer to storing or safeguarding something for future use.

  • For example, someone might say, “Save your progress in the game before exiting.”
  • In a discussion about budgeting, a person might advise, “Save money by cutting unnecessary expenses.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you save me a seat at the concert?”

12. Cherish

To hold something dear and treat it with love, care, and affection. “Cherish” implies valuing and appreciating something deeply.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I cherish the memories I made during my trip.”
  • A parent might express, “I cherish the time I spend with my children.”
  • A friend might tell another, “I cherish our friendship and all the fun times we’ve had.”

13. Cling to

To tightly grasp or hold onto something, often out of fear of losing it or for emotional support. “Cling to” suggests a strong attachment or dependency.

  • For example, someone might say, “She clings to her childhood stuffed animal for comfort.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, a person might admit, “I tend to cling to my partner when I’m feeling insecure.”
  • A friend might advise, “Clinging to the past can prevent you from moving forward. Try to let go and embrace the present.”

14. Keep in check

To monitor or regulate something to ensure it remains within acceptable limits or under control. “Keep in check” implies actively managing or restraining something.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to keep my emotions in check during the meeting.”
  • In a discussion about diet, someone might note, “It’s important to keep your sugar intake in check.”
  • A friend might suggest, “You should keep your spending habits in check to avoid financial problems.”

15. Maintain control

To have authority or power over something and ensure it operates or behaves as desired. “Maintain control” suggests actively taking charge and preventing chaos or disorder.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “It’s important to maintain control of the classroom to create a conducive learning environment.”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might assert, “A good leader knows how to maintain control while empowering others.”
  • A coach might advise, “To win the game, you need to maintain control of the ball and play strategically.”

16. Keep tabs on

This slang phrase means to closely observe or keep track of someone or something. It implies keeping a record or being aware of their actions or progress.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I like to keep tabs on my child’s social media activity to ensure their safety.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might say, “I need to keep tabs on the progress of this project to make sure it stays on track.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you keep tabs on my dog while I’m out of town?”

17. Keep under wraps

This phrase means to keep something confidential or hidden from public knowledge. It suggests keeping information or an object concealed or protected.

  • For instance, a movie studio might say, “We’re keeping the plot of the new film under wraps to build anticipation.”
  • A friend might say, “I have a surprise party planned for you, so keep it under wraps!”
  • In a business context, a company might say, “We’re keeping our new product design under wraps until the official launch.”

18. Keep close

This phrase means to maintain a close relationship with someone or to keep someone physically nearby.

  • For example, a mother might say, “I like to keep my children close to me to ensure their safety.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I want to keep you close because you mean a lot to me.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s keep close and support each other through thick and thin.”

19. Keep safe

This phrase means to take measures to ensure the safety or protection of someone or something.

  • For instance, a lifeguard might say, “Please follow the safety rules to keep safe while swimming.”
  • A parent might say, “I trust you to keep yourself safe while I’m away.”
  • In a workplace setting, a manager might say, “Wear appropriate safety gear to keep yourself safe.”

20. Keep track of

This phrase means to monitor or maintain awareness of something or someone’s progress or whereabouts.

  • For example, a project manager might say, “I need to keep track of the team’s progress to meet the deadline.”
  • A parent might say, “I like to keep track of my child’s activities to stay involved in their life.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you help me keep track of my expenses? I want to stick to my budget.”

21. Keep in mind

This phrase is used to remind someone to consider or be aware of something. It implies that the information or idea being mentioned should be kept in one’s thoughts or taken into account.

  • For example, when giving advice, one might say, “Keep in mind that everyone’s situation is different.”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We should keep in mind the budget constraints.”
  • When making plans, a person might say, “Let’s keep in mind that some people have dietary restrictions.”

22. Keep at bay

This phrase means to keep something or someone at a distance or prevent them from approaching or causing harm. It implies the need to stay vigilant and maintain a barrier between oneself and the potential threat.

  • For instance, when talking about mosquitoes, one might say, “Wear insect repellent to keep them at bay.”
  • In a discussion about managing stress, someone might suggest, “Exercise can help keep anxiety at bay.”
  • When dealing with a difficult person, a person might say, “I try to keep my emotions in check to keep conflict at bay.”

23. Keep on top of

This phrase means to stay informed or up to date with something. It implies the need to actively monitor and manage a particular situation or task in order to maintain control or awareness.

  • For example, when discussing work responsibilities, one might say, “I need to keep on top of my emails.”
  • In a conversation about current events, someone might suggest, “It’s important to keep on top of the news.”
  • When managing a project, a person might say, “I make sure to keep on top of deadlines and progress.”

24. Keep a lid on

This phrase means to keep something hidden or under control, often referring to sensitive or confidential information. It implies the need to prevent the spread or release of certain information or to maintain order and calmness in a situation.

  • For instance, when discussing a surprise party, one might say, “We need to keep a lid on the plans.”
  • In a conversation about a potential scandal, someone might suggest, “They’re trying to keep a lid on the situation.”
  • When dealing with a heated argument, a person might say, “Let’s keep a lid on our emotions and have a productive discussion.”

25. Holding it down

This phrase means to handle or manage a situation effectively or competently. It implies the ability to maintain control, stability, or success in a given area or responsibility.

  • For example, when discussing a job, one might say, “She’s really holding it down as the team leader.”
  • In a conversation about a household, someone might suggest, “He’s the one holding it down and taking care of everything.”
  • When talking about a sports team, a person might say, “The goalkeeper is holding it down and making crucial saves.”

26. Locking it down

This phrase is often used to describe the act of securing or making something official, especially in a relationship or agreement.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m ready to lock it down and make our relationship official.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to lock down this deal and finalize the terms.”
  • A person discussing their job might say, “I’ve locked down a steady income with this company.”

27. Guarding

This term refers to the act of protecting or watching over something or someone to ensure their safety or well-being.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I’m always guarding my children, making sure they’re safe.”
  • In a security context, a guard might be responsible for guarding a building or property.
  • A person discussing their personal boundaries might say, “I’m guarding my heart and not letting just anyone in.”

28. Preserving

Preserving refers to the act of maintaining or protecting something in its original state, often to prevent decay or deterioration.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m preserving this family recipe by passing it down through generations.”
  • In a museum setting, preserving artifacts and artwork is essential to their longevity.
  • A person discussing the environment might say, “Preserving natural habitats is crucial for the well-being of wildlife.”

29. Watching over

This phrase means to keep a close eye on something or someone, often to ensure their safety or well-being.

  • For instance, a babysitter might say, “I’ll be watching over the kids while you’re gone.”
  • In a neighborhood watch program, residents take turns watching over their community.
  • A person discussing their responsibilities might say, “I’m watching over the project to ensure it stays on track.”

30. Maintaining

Maintaining refers to the act of keeping something in good condition or preserving its current state.

  • For example, a homeowner might say, “I’m maintaining the garden by regularly watering and pruning.”
  • In a relationship, maintaining open communication is key to its success.
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’m maintaining a balanced diet and exercise routine to stay healthy.”

31. Safeguarding

This term refers to the act of protecting or ensuring the safety of something or someone. It implies taking precautions to prevent harm or loss.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I am safeguarding my child by teaching them about stranger danger.”
  • In a cybersecurity context, a person might say, “We need to safeguard our sensitive data from hackers.”
  • A company might emphasize the importance of safeguarding customer information by saying, “We have strict protocols in place for safeguarding customer data.”

32. Securing

Securing means taking measures to make something safe or protected from harm, theft, or unauthorized access.

  • For instance, a homeowner might say, “I am securing my house by installing a security system.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to secure our intellectual property to prevent competitors from stealing our ideas.”
  • A person discussing personal safety might advise others by saying, “Always secure your belongings when traveling to avoid theft.”

33. Retaining

Retaining refers to the act of keeping or holding on to something or someone. It implies keeping possession or control over something.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to retain our top talent to ensure the success of the company.”
  • In a legal context, someone might say, “The lawyer argued for retaining custody of the child.”
  • A person discussing memory might say, “Regular mental exercises can help in retaining information and preventing forgetfulness.”

34. Stashing

Stashing means hiding or storing something in a secret or secure place, often for future use or safekeeping.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I am stashing some extra cash in case of emergencies.”
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I need to stash this secret document where no one can find it.”
  • A person discussing survival skills might advise others by saying, “Always have a stash of non-perishable food and water for emergencies.”

35. Hoarding

Hoarding refers to the act of collecting or accumulating an excessive amount of something, often to the point of it becoming a problem or hindrance.

  • For example, a person might say, “My grandma has a hoarding problem with newspapers; her house is filled with stacks of them.”
  • In a discussion about food supplies, someone might say, “Hoarding essential items during a crisis can lead to shortages for others.”
  • A person discussing mental health might say, “Hoarding can be a symptom of obsessive-compulsive disorder and should be treated by a professional.”

36. Stockpiling

This refers to the act of accumulating or collecting a large quantity of something, often with the intention of saving it for future use. “Stockpiling” can be used in various contexts, such as stockpiling food, supplies, or even money.

  • For example, during a natural disaster, people might start stockpiling water and non-perishable food items.
  • In a discussion about personal finance, someone might mention, “I’ve been stockpiling my savings for years.”
  • A prepper might say, “I’ve been stockpiling survival gear and supplies in case of an emergency.”

37. Concealing

This term is used to describe the act of keeping something hidden or secret. “Concealing” can refer to physical objects or even information.

  • For instance, a person might be concealing a weapon under their clothing for self-defense purposes.
  • In a spy movie, a character might say, “I’ve been concealing my true identity for years.”
  • A person might confess, “I’ve been concealing my feelings for someone for a long time.”

38. Sheltering

This term is often used to describe the act of providing refuge or protection for someone or something. “Sheltering” can refer to physical shelter, such as a building or structure, or it can be used metaphorically to describe emotional or psychological support.

  • For example, during a storm, people might seek shelter in a sturdy building to stay safe.
  • In a discussion about parenting, someone might say, “I believe in sheltering my children from certain negative influences.”
  • A person might express gratitude by saying, “Thank you for sheltering me during a difficult time in my life.”

39. Clinging to

This term describes the act of holding onto something tightly and not letting go. “Clinging to” can be used to describe physical objects or even emotions or beliefs.

  • For instance, a person might be clinging to a childhood toy for sentimental reasons.
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I’m still clinging to the hope that we can work things out.”
  • A person might admit, “I’ve been clinging to the past instead of embracing the present.”

40. Cherishing

This term refers to the act of valuing or appreciating something deeply. “Cherishing” often implies a sense of emotional attachment or sentimental value.

  • For example, a person might cherish a family heirloom that has been passed down for generations.
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I cherish the memories we’ve created together.”
  • A person might express their love and affection by saying, “I cherish every moment I spend with you.”

41. Nurturing

Nurturing refers to the act of taking care of something or someone with love and attention. It implies providing support and protection.

  • For example, a parent might say, “I am nurturing my child’s talents by enrolling them in music lessons.”
  • A gardener might explain, “Nurturing plants involves watering, fertilizing, and providing the right amount of sunlight.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Nurturing a healthy relationship requires open communication and mutual respect.”

42. Collecting

Collecting refers to the act of gathering and storing items of a particular type as a hobby or passion. It involves seeking out and acquiring specific objects.

  • For instance, a coin collector might say, “I enjoy collecting rare coins from different countries.”
  • Someone passionate about comic books might explain, “I’ve been collecting superhero comics since I was a kid.”
  • In a discussion about antiques, a collector might share, “I have a passion for collecting vintage furniture and home decor.”

43. Clutching

Clutching refers to the act of holding onto something tightly or firmly, often out of fear of losing it or for security.

  • For example, a person might say, “I was clutching my phone tightly as I walked through the crowded street.”
  • In a basketball game, a player might be described as “clutching the ball tightly” during a crucial moment.
  • A person discussing a difficult situation might say, “I felt like I was clutching onto hope to get through it.”

44. Secreting

Secreting refers to the act of hiding or concealing something in a secretive or discreet manner.

  • For instance, a spy might be described as “secreting classified documents in a hidden compartment.”
  • In a mystery novel, a character might be revealed to have been “secreting important information throughout the story.”
  • A person discussing personal secrets might say, “I’ve been secreting my true feelings about the situation for a long time.”

45. Tucking away

Tucking away refers to the act of carefully and securely storing something in a safe place for later use or preservation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m tucking away some money in a savings account for emergencies.”
  • In a cooking tutorial, a chef might advise, “Tuck away any leftovers in an airtight container to keep them fresh.”
  • A person discussing sentimental items might explain, “I like tucking away mementos from special occasions to look back on in the future.”

46. Holding onto

“I’m holding onto this ticket until the show starts.” – “She’s holding onto her childhood teddy bear.” – “He’s holding onto his anger and resentment.”

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47. Clamping down

“The government is clamping down on illegal activities.” – “The school is clamping down on tardiness.” – “The boss is clamping down on employee breaks.”

48. Safeguard

“The security guard is there to safeguard the museum artifacts.” – “We need to safeguard our personal information online.” – “It’s important to safeguard our environment for future generations.”

49. Treasure

“She treasured the necklace her grandmother gave her.” – “He treasures his friendship with his childhood best friend.” – “The family treasures their time spent together.”

50. Keep hold of

“She managed to keep hold of her umbrella in the strong wind.” – “He’s determined to keep hold of his position as team captain.” – “The company wants to keep hold of its top talent.”

51. Keep in custody

This phrase refers to the act of holding someone in legal custody, typically by law enforcement or other authorities. It implies that the person is being detained or held for a specific period of time.

  • For example, “The suspect was kept in custody until their trial.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The suspect is being kept in custody pending further investigation.”
  • A police officer might say, “We need to keep the suspect in custody until we gather more evidence.”

52. Keep in reserve

To keep something in reserve means to retain it for future use or action, often in case it is needed at a later time.

  • For instance, “I’m going to keep some money in reserve in case of emergencies.”
  • In a military context, it might be said, “We need to keep some troops in reserve in case the situation escalates.”
  • A coach might advise their team, “Let’s keep our best players in reserve until the second half.”

53. Keep safe and sound

To keep someone or something safe and sound means to ensure their safety and well-being, often by taking necessary precautions or protective measures.

  • For example, “I will keep your belongings safe and sound while you’re away.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Make sure you keep yourself safe and sound while you’re out with your friends.”
  • A caretaker might reassure a pet owner, “Don’t worry, I’ll keep your pet safe and sound while you’re on vacation.”