Top 30 Slang For Fox – Meaning & Usage

Foxes, with their cunning and mysterious nature, have captivated human imagination for centuries. But did you know that there are slang terms used to describe these sly creatures? Whether you’re a nature enthusiast or just curious about the latest lingo, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil the top slang for fox that will have you feeling like a true wordsmith in no time.

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1. Vixen

This term is often used to describe a woman who is considered attractive and alluring. It can also be used to describe a woman who is cunning or sly.

  • For example, a person might say, “She’s such a vixen, she always turns heads when she walks into a room.”
  • In a discussion about female empowerment, someone might say, “Embrace your inner vixen and be confident in your own skin.”
  • A person might compliment someone by saying, “You’re a vixen in that dress, it really suits you.”

2. Foxy

This term is used to describe someone, usually a woman, who is considered sexy or attractive. It can also be used to describe something that is stylish or fashionable.

  • For instance, a person might say, “She’s looking foxy in that outfit.”
  • In a conversation about celebrities, someone might comment, “Angelina Jolie has always had a foxy appeal.”
  • A person might compliment their partner by saying, “You’re looking foxy tonight, babe.”

3. Silver fox

This term is used to describe an older man, typically with gray or silver hair, who is considered attractive and charming.

  • For example, someone might say, “George Clooney is the epitome of a silver fox.”
  • In a discussion about age and attractiveness, a person might say, “Some men only get better with age and become silver foxes.”
  • A person might compliment someone by saying, “You’re becoming quite the silver fox, don’t let the gray hair bother you.”

4. Sly fox

This term is used to describe someone who is cunning, clever, or crafty in their actions or behavior.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s a sly fox, always finding a way to get what he wants.”
  • In a conversation about politicians, someone might comment, “You need to be a sly fox to succeed in the world of politics.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s intelligence by saying, “You’re a sly fox, I’m always impressed by your quick thinking.”

5. Red fox

This term refers to a specific species of fox, known for its reddish fur. It can also be used to describe someone with red hair.

  • For example, a person might say, “I saw a red fox in my backyard yesterday.”
  • In a discussion about animal conservation, someone might mention, “The red fox is a common sight in many parts of North America.”
  • A person might compliment someone’s hair color by saying, “You have such beautiful red hair, like a red fox.”

6. Arctic fox

This refers to a small, white fox species native to the Arctic regions. The term “Arctic fox” is often used to describe the species’ habitat and physical characteristics.

  • For instance, in wildlife documentaries, you might hear, “The Arctic fox is well-adapted to survive in extreme cold.”
  • In a discussion about animal conservation, one might say, “The Arctic fox population is declining due to climate change.”
  • A nature enthusiast might note, “Spotting an Arctic fox in its natural habitat is a rare and breathtaking experience.”

7. Swift fox

This refers to a small fox species native to North America. The term “swift fox” is often used to describe the species’ agility and quickness.

  • For example, in a conversation about wildlife, someone might say, “The swift fox can reach speeds of up to 60 kilometers per hour.”
  • A photographer capturing images of the swift fox might comment, “The swift fox’s sleek body allows it to maneuver swiftly through the grasslands.”
  • Another might admire, “The swift fox’s ability to change direction quickly is truly impressive.”

8. Fennec fox

This refers to a small fox species native to the Sahara Desert and other arid regions of North Africa. The term “fennec fox” is often used to describe the species’ habitat and unique physical characteristics.

  • For instance, in discussions about desert wildlife, you might hear, “The fennec fox has large ears to dissipate heat and detect prey.”
  • In a conversation about adaptation, someone might say, “The fennec fox’s ability to survive in extreme desert conditions is remarkable.”
  • A traveler who has encountered a fennec fox might share, “Seeing a fennec fox in the wild was a highlight of my desert journey.”

9. Kit fox

This refers to a small fox species native to the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. The term “kit fox” is often used to describe the species’ young or immature individuals.

  • For example, in a discussion about fox breeding, someone might mention, “The kit fox gives birth to a litter of 3-5 pups.”
  • A wildlife observer might comment, “Watching a kit fox family play and interact is a heartwarming experience.”
  • Another might note, “The kit fox’s adaptability to arid environments is essential for its survival.”

10. Gray fox

This refers to a medium-sized fox species found throughout North and Central America. The term “gray fox” is often used to describe the species’ coloration and appearance.

  • For instance, in a conversation about fox species, someone might say, “The gray fox has a unique mix of gray, red, and white fur.”
  • In discussions about urban wildlife, one might mention, “The gray fox is known for its ability to adapt and thrive in suburban environments.”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “Spotting a gray fox in the wild is always a treat, as they are elusive and beautiful creatures.”

11. Clever fox

This term refers to a fox that is smart, quick-witted, and cunning. It is often used to describe someone who is clever or resourceful.

  • For example, “She outsmarted her opponents like a clever fox.”
  • In a discussion about problem-solving, one might say, “You need to think like a clever fox to find a solution.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s wit might say, “You’re a clever fox, always coming up with clever comebacks.”

12. Red-haired fox

This term specifically refers to a fox with red or orange fur. It can also be used to describe a person with red hair.

  • For instance, “Look at that beautiful red-haired fox in the woods.”
  • In a conversation about hair color, one might say, “I’ve always wanted to be a red-haired fox.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s unique appearance might say, “You’re a stunning red-haired fox.”

13. Sly dog

Although not directly referring to a fox, this term is often used to describe someone who is clever, crafty, or deceitful, much like a fox.

  • For example, “He managed to escape from the police like a sly dog.”
  • In a discussion about cunning tactics, one might say, “You need to be a sly dog to outsmart your opponents.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s ability to manipulate situations might say, “You’re a sly dog, always finding a way to get what you want.”

14. Foxy mama

This term is used to describe an attractive, stylish, and seductive woman. It compares her allure and beauty to that of a fox.

  • For instance, “She walked into the room like a foxy mama, turning heads.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, one might say, “She always dresses like a foxy mama.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s attractiveness might say, “You’re a foxy mama, always catching everyone’s attention.”

15. Cunning vixen

This term specifically refers to a female fox that is clever, sly, and resourceful. It is often used to describe a woman who possesses these qualities.

  • For example, “She managed to outwit her opponents like a cunning vixen.”
  • In a discussion about intelligent women, one might say, “She’s a cunning vixen, always coming up with brilliant ideas.”
  • A person complimenting someone’s ability to strategize might say, “You’re a cunning vixen, always one step ahead of everyone else.”

16. Foxy grandpa

This term refers to an older man who is still attractive and charming. It is often used in a playful or flirtatious manner.

  • For example, “Look at that foxy grandpa over there, he’s still got it!”
  • A person might compliment someone by saying, “You’re looking like a foxy grandpa today!”
  • In a movie or TV show, a character might be described as a “foxy grandpa” to highlight their attractiveness and charisma.
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17. Reynard

This term originates from Reynard the Fox, a character in medieval folklore known for his trickery and cunning. It is used to describe someone who is clever and deceitful.

  • For instance, “Watch out for him, he’s a real reynard.”
  • A person might say, “You have to be as sly as a reynard to outsmart them.”
  • In a story or novel, a character might be described as a “reynard” to emphasize their cunning and ability to manipulate others.

18. Redcoat

This term refers to British soldiers, particularly during the American Revolutionary War when they wore red coats as part of their uniform. It is used to describe someone who is British or has a British military background.

  • For example, “He’s a redcoat, he must be from England.”
  • A person might say, “You can always spot a redcoat from a mile away.”
  • In a historical context, the term “redcoat” is used to refer to British soldiers during the American Revolution.

19. Brush-tail

This term describes a fox with a particularly bushy tail. It is often used to refer to foxes in general, emphasizing their distinctive feature.

  • For instance, “Look at that brush-tail running through the field.”
  • A person might say, “I saw a beautiful brush-tail fox in the woods.”
  • In a nature documentary, the narrator might mention the “graceful movements of the brush-tail.”

20. Copper

This term is slang for a police officer. It is derived from the copper badges that police officers used to wear.

  • For example, “Watch out, the coppers are coming!”
  • A person might say, “I got stopped by a copper for speeding.”
  • In a crime novel or movie, a character might refer to the police as “the coppers.”

21. Tod

A “tod” is a term used to refer to a young fox, specifically a fox cub. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “Look at that adorable tod playing in the field!”
  • A nature enthusiast might say, “I spotted a group of tods near the den.”
  • In a children’s book, a character might exclaim, “I want to be friends with the tod!”

22. Charlie

“Charlie” is a slang term used to refer to a fox, particularly in military contexts. It is derived from the NATO phonetic alphabet where “Charlie” represents the letter C, which stands for “foxhole.”

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “We need to be cautious, there might be Charlies in the area.”
  • In a war movie, a character might shout, “Enemy Charlies approaching from the east!”
  • A military historian might discuss, “The use of foxholes as defensive positions during wartime.”

23. Reynie

A “Reynie” is a slang term used to describe a fox that is cunning, sly, or clever. It is often used to depict the intelligence or craftiness of a fox.

  • For example, “That Reynie managed to outsmart the hunters and escape.”
  • A person might say, “Don’t underestimate the Reynie’s ability to find food.”
  • In a fable or story, a character might be described as a “wily Reynie.”

24. Brushy

The term “brushy” is used to describe a fox with a large, full, or bushy tail. It highlights the characteristic physical feature of a fox’s tail.

  • For instance, “Look at that brushy fox running through the field!”
  • A nature photographer might comment, “The brushy tails of foxes make for stunning photos.”
  • In a wildlife documentary, the narrator might say, “The fox’s brushy tail helps with balance and communication.”

25. Foxtail

A “foxtail” refers to the tail of a fox. It is often used to describe the long, fluffy, and bushy tail characteristic of foxes.

  • For example, “The fox’s foxtail swayed gracefully as it walked.”
  • A person might say, “I love how a fox’s foxtail adds to its overall appearance.”
  • In a children’s book, a character might be described as having a “soft and fluffy foxtail.”

26. Foxtrot

The foxtrot is a smooth, progressive dance characterized by long, flowing movements across the dance floor. It is often associated with ballroom dancing and is known for its elegance and grace.

  • For example, a dance instructor might say, “Let’s start with the basic steps of the foxtrot.”
  • A couple preparing for a wedding might take foxtrot lessons for their first dance.
  • In a dance competition, the judges might comment, “Their foxtrot was flawless and full of style.”

27. Foxhole

A foxhole is a small, dugout hole or trench used by soldiers as a defensive position during combat. It provides cover and protection from enemy fire.

  • For instance, a soldier might say, “We took cover in a foxhole during the intense firefight.”
  • In a war movie, a character might shout, “Take cover in the nearest foxhole!”
  • A veteran might share their experience, “I spent many nights huddled in a foxhole, praying for safety.”

28. Fox and hounds

Fox and hounds is a game where one or two people (the “hounds”) try to catch the others (the “foxes”) who are trying to avoid being caught. It is often played outdoors and requires strategy and agility.

  • For example, a group of friends might say, “Let’s play fox and hounds in the park this weekend.”
  • In a schoolyard, children might organize a game of fox and hounds during recess.
  • A parent might reminisce, “I used to love playing fox and hounds with my siblings when we were kids.”

29. Foxing around

To “fox around” means to engage in aimless or unproductive activities, often in a playful or lighthearted manner. It can refer to goofing off, procrastinating, or simply enjoying leisure time.

  • For instance, a teacher might scold a student, “Stop foxing around and get back to work.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, someone might say, “I tend to fox around when I have a lot of free time.”
  • A friend might suggest, “Let’s fox around this weekend and just relax.”

30. Fox in the henhouse

The phrase “fox in the henhouse” is used to describe someone who causes mischief or disrupts a group’s harmony. It implies that the person is sly, cunning, and potentially dangerous.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to be careful not to let any foxes in the henhouse.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might accuse a politician of being a “fox in the henhouse.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Stay away from those kids. They’re troublemakers, like a fox in the henhouse.”