Top 30 Slang For Pool – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to hanging out by the pool, there’s more to talk about than just the weather and sunscreen. We’ve rounded up the top slang words and phrases that will have you sounding like a pro poolside. From cannonballs to floaties, this list has got you covered with all the cool lingo you need to make a splash this summer. So grab your towel and get ready to dive into our pool of slang!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Billiards

Billiards is a general term that refers to a category of cue sports. It includes various games played on a billiard table with a cue stick and balls. The term “billiards” is often used interchangeably with “pool” and “cue sports”.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s go play some billiards at the local pool hall.”
  • In a discussion about different cue sports, someone might ask, “What’s your favorite billiards game to play?”
  • A player might comment, “I’ve been practicing my billiards skills for years and still enjoy the game.”

2. Cue sports

Cue sports is a broader term that encompasses various games played with a cue stick and balls on a billiard table. It includes games like pool, snooker, and carom billiards. The term “cue sports” is used to differentiate these games from other sports that use cues, such as darts or archery.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I enjoy playing cue sports in my free time.”
  • In a discussion about different cue sports, someone might ask, “Which cue sport do you find the most challenging?”
  • A player might comment, “Cue sports require precision and strategy, making them a great mental exercise.”

3. Pocket billiards

Pocket billiards is a term used to describe a category of cue sports where the objective is to pocket balls into designated pockets on the table. It includes games like 8-ball, 9-ball, and straight pool. The term “pocket billiards” is often used to distinguish these games from carom billiards, where players must contact specific balls without pocketing them.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s play a game of pocket billiards, like 8-ball or 9-ball.”
  • In a discussion about different cue sports, someone might ask, “Do you prefer pocket billiards or carom billiards?”
  • A player might comment, “Pocket billiards requires a combination of skill and strategy to win.”

4. 8-ball

8-ball is a popular pocket billiards game played with a cue ball and 15 object balls, numbered 1 through 15. The goal is to pocket all of your designated balls (either stripes or solids) and then pocket the 8-ball to win. The term “8-ball” is often used to refer specifically to this game.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s play a game of 8-ball, winner takes the table.”
  • In a discussion about different pool games, someone might ask, “What’s your strategy for playing 8-ball?”
  • A player might comment, “I’ve been practicing my 8-ball break, trying to make a ball on the snap.”

5. Snooker

Snooker is a cue sport played on a larger table with smaller pockets and 21 object balls. The objective is to score more points than your opponent by pocketing balls in a specific order. Snooker is often associated with British and Commonwealth countries. The term “snooker” is used to refer specifically to this game.

  • For example, a person might say, “I enjoy watching snooker tournaments on TV.”
  • In a discussion about different cue sports, someone might ask, “Have you ever played snooker? It’s quite challenging.”
  • A player might comment, “Snooker requires precise positioning and strategic shot selection to succeed.”

6. Carom

This term refers to a shot where the cue ball hits two or more object balls in a single stroke. It is commonly used in carom billiards, a game where players score points by making carom shots.

  • For example, a player might say, “I made a great carom shot and pocketed two balls at once.”
  • In a discussion about billiards techniques, someone might ask, “What’s the best way to practice carom shots?”
  • A billiards enthusiast might comment, “Carom shots require precise aim and control of the cue ball.”

7. Scratch

In pool, a scratch refers to when the cue ball is pocketed or leaves the playing surface. It is considered a foul and results in the incoming player getting ball in hand, meaning they can place the cue ball anywhere on the table.

  • For instance, if a player accidentally pockets the cue ball while trying to make a shot, it’s a scratch.
  • In a game of 8-ball, a player might say, “I scratched on the break, so you have ball in hand.”
  • A pool player might warn a beginner, “Be careful not to scratch, it can cost you the game.”

8. Break

The break is the first shot of a game, where the player strikes the racked balls with the cue ball to start the game. It is important to have a powerful and controlled break to maximize the chance of pocketing balls.

  • For example, a player might say, “I had a great break and made three balls on the opening shot.”
  • In a discussion about pool strategies, someone might ask, “What’s the best way to improve your break?”
  • A pool enthusiast might comment, “A strong break can set the tone for the entire game.”

9. Rack

The rack is the wooden or plastic frame used to arrange the balls in a specific pattern before the start of a game. The most common rack shape is a triangle, with the apex ball on the foot spot and the other balls arranged in a tight formation.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I’ll rack the balls for the next game.”
  • In a tutorial on how to play pool, someone might explain, “Place the balls in the rack and ensure they are tightly packed.”
  • A pool player might comment, “A good rack can lead to a better break and more opportunities to pocket balls.”

10. English

In pool, English refers to applying spin or side spin to the cue ball to control its path after striking an object ball. It allows players to manipulate the direction and speed of the cue ball for more precise shots.

  • For example, a player might say, “I used left English to make the cue ball spin and avoid a scratch.”
  • In a discussion about advanced pool techniques, someone might ask, “How do you properly apply English to a shot?”
  • A pool enthusiast might comment, “English can add a whole new dimension to your game and open up new shot possibilities.”

11. Rail

In pool, the rail refers to the cushioned edge of the table. It is used as a rebounding surface for the balls during gameplay.

  • For example, “The cue ball hit the rail and bounced back towards the center of the table.”
  • A player might say, “I’m going to aim for the rail to get a better angle on the next shot.”
  • If a ball barely touches the rail, a spectator might exclaim, “That was a close call!”

12. Bank shot

A bank shot is when a ball is hit off the rail or cushion to change its direction and make it reach the intended target.

  • For instance, “He made an incredible bank shot to pocket the ball in the corner.”
  • A player might strategize, “I’m going to try a bank shot to avoid hitting other balls.”
  • If a bank shot is successful, someone might say, “Nice rail shot! That was a difficult angle.”

13. Combo

A combo, short for combination shot, is when a player intentionally hits one ball to make it collide with another ball or balls, in order to pocket the target ball(s).

  • For example, “She made an impressive combo to pocket two balls in one shot.”
  • A player might plan, “I’m going to attempt a combo to clear the table.”
  • If a combo shot is missed, someone might comment, “That was a tough combination. Better luck next time!”

14. Massé

A massé is a shot in which the player strikes the cue ball with extreme spin, causing it to curve or swerve around an obstacle or to achieve a specific position.

  • For instance, “He used a massé to avoid hitting the obstructing ball and pocketed the target ball.”
  • A player might demonstrate, “Watch me perform a massé shot to get out of this difficult situation.”
  • If a massé shot is executed perfectly, someone might say, “That was an amazing curve shot! Precision at its finest.”

15. Jump shot

A jump shot is when the cue ball is intentionally made to leave the table momentarily by striking it at an angle, allowing it to jump over an obstructing ball and potentially pocket another ball.

  • For example, “He made a skillful jump shot to clear the ball in front and pocketed the target ball.”
  • A player might discuss strategy, “A well-executed jump shot can be a game-changer.”
  • If a jump shot is unsuccessful, someone might comment, “That was a difficult jump. It’s a risky move.”

16. Safety

In pool, a safety refers to a defensive shot that is played to leave the opponent in a difficult position, making it harder for them to make their next shot. The objective of a safety is to gain an advantage over the opponent or force them to make a mistake.

  • For example, a player might play a safety by intentionally leaving the cue ball behind a blocking ball, making it difficult for the opponent to make a clear shot.
  • Another example would be playing a safety by placing the cue ball in a position where the opponent has limited options for their next shot.
  • A player might say, “I’m going to play a safety and try to leave my opponent in a tough spot.”

17. Hustle

In pool, hustling refers to the act of deceiving or tricking an opponent in order to gain an advantage or win a bet. It involves pretending to be a weaker player or intentionally hiding one’s true skill level.

  • For instance, a skilled player might hustle an inexperienced opponent by pretending to struggle and make mistakes at the beginning of a game.
  • Another example would be a player intentionally making simple mistakes and missing easy shots to lower the opponent’s guard.
  • A player might say, “I’m going to hustle my friend and make him think I’m not very good at pool.”

18. Shark

In pool, sharking refers to the act of distracting or intimidating an opponent in order to throw off their concentration and make them play poorly. It can involve various tactics such as making noise, talking, or moving around during the opponent’s shot.

  • For example, a player might shark their opponent by standing too close to them, making sudden movements, or engaging in trash talk.
  • Another example would be a player intentionally making loud noises or tapping the table during the opponent’s shot to disrupt their focus.
  • A player might say, “I’m going to shark my opponent by talking to them while they’re shooting.”

19. Run

In pool, a run refers to a sequence of consecutive successful shots made by a player without missing. It can also refer to the number of balls a player successfully pockets in a row.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I had a run of 5 balls before missing my next shot.”
  • Another example would be a player making multiple shots in a row without the opponent getting a turn.
  • A player might comment, “He’s on a run right now, he hasn’t missed a shot in a while.”

20. Chalk

In pool, chalk refers to the small cube of chalk used to apply to the tip of the cue stick. Chalking the cue tip helps to increase friction between the cue tip and the cue ball, which improves accuracy and reduces miscues.

  • For example, a player might say, “Don’t forget to chalk your cue before taking the shot.”
  • Another example would be a player applying chalk to their cue tip before attempting a difficult shot.
  • A player might ask, “Can I borrow your chalk? I forgot mine.”

21. Rack ’em up

This phrase is used to indicate the act of arranging the balls in the triangular rack at the beginning of a game of pool. It is often said by the person who is responsible for setting up the balls before the break shot.

  • For example, a player might say, “Alright, let’s rack ’em up and get this game started.”
  • In a pool tournament, a referee might instruct the players, “Please rack ’em up for the next match.”
  • A beginner might ask, “Can you show me how to properly rack ’em up?”

22. Break shot

The break shot is the first shot taken in a game of pool, where the player tries to scatter the balls by hitting the cue ball with enough force. It is an important shot because it sets the tone for the rest of the game.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I need to make a strong break shot to gain an advantage.”
  • In a discussion about pool strategies, someone might mention, “A good break shot can help you control the game.”
  • A commentator might analyze a player’s break shot by saying, “He made a powerful break shot, but unfortunately, he didn’t pocket any balls.”

23. Bridge

The bridge refers to the hand position and support used to steady the cue stick while taking a shot. It provides stability and control, allowing the player to accurately strike the cue ball.

  • For example, a player might say, “I have a steady bridge, so my shots are more consistent.”
  • In a pool tutorial, an instructor might explain, “The bridge hand should form a stable platform for the cue.”
  • A player might ask for advice, “How can I improve my bridge for better shot accuracy?”

24. Pocket

In pool, the pockets are the openings on the table where the balls are intended to be pocketed. The objective of the game is to sink the balls into the pockets, earning points or clearing them off the table.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I just need to sink this ball into the corner pocket.”
  • In a discussion about different pool games, someone might mention, “In 8-ball, you have to sink all your balls into the designated pockets.”
  • A commentator might describe a skillful shot by saying, “He expertly banked the ball into the side pocket.”

25. Cue ball

The cue ball is the solid white ball used to strike the other balls in a game of pool. It is usually hit by the cue stick and serves as the player’s primary tool for making shots.

  • For example, a player might say, “I need to position the cue ball for my next shot.”
  • In a pool tutorial, an instructor might explain, “The cue ball should be struck with the center of the cue tip.”
  • A commentator might analyze a player’s shot by saying, “He controlled the cue ball well, leaving himself an easy shot on the next ball.”

26. Solids

In a game of pool, the balls are divided into two groups: stripes and solids. Solids refer to the numbered balls 1 through 7, which are usually solid in color and have no stripes or other markings.

  • For example, a player might say, “I’m going for the solids this round.”
  • In a discussion about strategy, someone might advise, “Try to pocket all the solids before going for the 8-ball.”
  • A pool player might ask their opponent, “Are you going to shoot the stripes or the solids?”

27. Stripes

In a game of pool, the balls are divided into two groups: stripes and solids. Stripes refer to the numbered balls 9 through 15, which have a stripe pattern on them.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I’m aiming for the stripes this time.”
  • In a friendly game, someone might ask, “Do you want to shoot the stripes or the solids?”
  • A pool enthusiast might comment, “I prefer the stripes because they’re more challenging to pocket.”

28. 9-ball

A popular variation of pool where players must pocket the balls in numerical order, starting with the 1-ball and ending with the 9-ball. The 9-ball must be pocketed last to win the game.

  • For example, a player might say, “Let’s play a quick game of 9-ball.”
  • In a discussion about different pool games, someone might ask, “Have you ever played 9-ball before?”
  • A pool enthusiast might comment, “9-ball requires a different strategy compared to other pool games.”

29. Dead stroke

When a player executes a shot perfectly, hitting the cue ball with the right amount of force and accuracy. A dead stroke is often characterized by the smooth and controlled movement of the cue stick and the satisfying sound of the balls colliding.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I had a dead stroke on that shot.”
  • In a discussion about pool skills, someone might ask, “How do you achieve a dead stroke?”
  • A pool player might comment, “When you have a dead stroke, the balls seem to go exactly where you want them to.”

30. Eight-ball

A popular pool game played with a cue ball and 15 object balls, including the black 8-ball. The objective is to pocket all of your designated balls (stripes or solids) and then legally pocket the 8-ball to win the game.

  • For example, a player might say, “Let’s play a game of eight-ball.”
  • In a discussion about different pool games, someone might ask, “Do you prefer eight-ball or nine-ball?”
  • A pool enthusiast might comment, “Eight-ball is a classic game that requires both skill and strategy.”
See also  Top 91 Slang For Drop Me A Mail Crossword – Meaning & Usage