Top 20 Slang For Get Hands On – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to getting your hands on the latest trends and must-have items, knowing the right slang can make all the difference. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the most popular and trendy phrases for “get hands on” so you can stay ahead of the curve and sound like a pro while doing it. Trust us, you won’t want to miss out on these fresh expressions that will level up your cool factor!

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1. Score

This term is often used to mean “get” or “obtain” something. It can be used in various contexts, from obtaining a physical item to achieving a goal or success.

  • For example, “I scored a new phone on sale.”
  • A sports fan might say, “Our team scored a victory in the championship.”
  • In a video game, a player might exclaim, “I scored a rare item in the loot box!”

2. Secure

To secure something means to obtain it, usually with some effort or difficulty. It implies taking steps to ensure that the item or goal is obtained successfully.

  • For instance, “I secured a job interview with a prestigious company.”
  • A person might say, “I need to secure funding for my startup.”
  • In a military context, a commander might order, “Secure the perimeter and obtain the target.”

3. Obtain

To obtain something means to get or acquire it, often by making an effort or fulfilling certain requirements.

  • For example, “I obtained a copy of the rare book.”
  • A student might say, “I need to obtain permission to conduct my research.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might argue, “The defendant did not obtain consent for the search.”

4. Acquire

Acquire means to gain possession or obtain something, usually through effort or action.

  • For instance, “He acquired a valuable collection of artwork.”
  • A businessperson might say, “We need to acquire new customers to expand our market.”
  • In a discussion about language learning, someone might mention, “Acquiring a new language takes time and practice.”

5. Procure

Procure means to obtain or acquire something, often through effort or special means.

  • For example, “She procured a rare artifact for the museum.”
  • A spy might say, “I need to procure classified information.”
  • In a medical context, a doctor might prescribe, “Procure the necessary medication for the patient.”

6. Get your mitts on

This phrase means to obtain or get possession of something. It is often used in a playful or colloquial manner.

  • For example, “I finally got my mitts on the new iPhone!”
  • A person might say, “I can’t wait to get my mitts on that limited edition vinyl record.”
  • In a conversation about finding rare collectibles, someone might exclaim, “I managed to get my mitts on a first edition comic book!”

7. Bag

To “bag” something means to successfully acquire or obtain it. This slang term is often used to express accomplishment or success in getting something.

  • For instance, “I finally bagged that job I’ve been dreaming of!”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to bag a ticket to that sold-out concert.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “I managed to bag some great deals during the sale.”

8. Snag

To “snag” something means to catch or obtain it, often with some effort or difficulty. It implies successfully getting hold of something that might have been elusive or hard to obtain.

  • For example, “I managed to snag the last copy of the book before it sold out.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping to snag a seat at the front row of the concert.”
  • In a discussion about finding bargains, someone might say, “I snagged this designer dress for a fraction of the original price.”

9. Nail down

To “nail down” something means to secure or finalize it. It implies successfully accomplishing a task or obtaining something after some effort or negotiation.

  • For instance, “We need to nail down the details of the contract before signing.”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to nail down a date for the party.”
  • In a conversation about planning a trip, someone might say, “I finally nailed down the hotel reservations.”

10. Land

To “land” something means to successfully obtain or acquire it. It is often used to express accomplishment or success in getting something.

  • For example, “I managed to land a job at my dream company.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping to land a promotion at work.”
  • In a discussion about finding a new apartment, someone might say, “I finally landed a spacious apartment in the city.”

11. Get a grip on

To grasp or comprehend a concept or situation. It can also refer to gaining control over one’s emotions or actions.

  • For example, “I need to get a grip on this math problem before the test.”
  • In a conversation about managing stress, someone might say, “It’s important to get a grip on your emotions and not let them overwhelm you.”
  • A friend might advise, “You need to get a grip on your spending habits if you want to save money.”

12. Get your paws on

To get one’s hands on something, usually with a sense of eagerness or anticipation.

  • For instance, “I can’t wait to get my paws on the new video game.”
  • In a discussion about limited edition merchandise, someone might say, “I managed to get my paws on a rare collector’s item.”
  • A fan of a popular band might exclaim, “I’m determined to get my paws on tickets to their concert!”

13. Get your claws on

To obtain or acquire something in a forceful or assertive manner, often with a sense of possessiveness or dominance.

  • For example, “She always manages to get her claws on the latest fashion trends.”
  • In a conversation about competitive shopping, someone might say, “I’ll do whatever it takes to get my claws on that limited edition item.”
  • A person discussing business negotiations might advise, “You need to be assertive and get your claws on the best deal.”

14. Get your hands dirty

To actively participate in a task or project that requires physical labor or involvement, often in a messy or dirty environment.

  • For instance, “I’m not afraid to get my hands dirty and help with the construction work.”
  • In a discussion about gardening, someone might say, “You have to be willing to get your hands dirty if you want a beautiful garden.”
  • A mentor might advise, “Don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty and learn from experience.”

15. Get a piece of

To obtain or acquire a portion or share of something, often in a competitive or assertive manner.

  • For example, “He’s determined to get a piece of the profits from the business venture.”
  • In a conversation about a popular restaurant, someone might say, “I can’t wait to get a piece of their delicious pizza.”
  • A person discussing a competitive industry might declare, “I’m going to work hard to get a piece of the market share.”

16. Get a slice of

This phrase is often used to express the desire to obtain a portion or share of something, typically in a figurative sense.

  • For example, “I want to get a slice of the profits from this business venture.”
  • In a discussion about a new job opportunity, someone might say, “I’m hoping to get a slice of the action in that industry.”
  • A person discussing a sports event might say, “I want to get a slice of the excitement by attending the game.”

17. Get your hands on the prize

This phrase is used to express the act of acquiring or obtaining the desired prize or reward, often in a competitive context.

  • For instance, “He worked hard to get his hands on the prize and finally won the competition.”
  • In a discussion about a limited edition item, someone might say, “I’m determined to get my hands on the prize before it sells out.”
  • A person discussing a raffle might say, “I hope I get my hands on the prize this time.”

18. Get a piece of the action

This phrase is commonly used to express the desire to participate or benefit from a particular activity or opportunity, especially one that is exciting or profitable.

  • For example, “He wants to get a piece of the action in the real estate market.”
  • In a discussion about a business venture, someone might say, “I’m looking to get a piece of the action by investing in that company.”
  • A person discussing a new trend might say, “Everyone wants to get a piece of the action and capitalize on its popularity.”

19. Get a taste of

This phrase is often used to express the desire to experience or try something, typically in a figurative sense.

  • For instance, “I want to get a taste of the local cuisine when I travel.”
  • In a discussion about a new hobby, someone might say, “I’m excited to get a taste of painting and see if I enjoy it.”
  • A person discussing a new adventure might say, “I’m ready to get a taste of the thrill and adrenaline of skydiving.”

20. Get a shot at

This phrase is used to express the desire or opportunity to try or achieve something, often in a competitive or challenging context.

  • For example, “He finally got a shot at his dream job after years of hard work.”
  • In a discussion about a sports competition, someone might say, “I hope I get a shot at playing in the championship game.”
  • A person discussing a talent show might say, “I want to get a shot at showcasing my singing abilities on stage.”
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