Top 61 Slang For Time Frame – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to talking about time, language is constantly evolving to keep up with the fast-paced world we live in. Stay ahead of the curve with our curated list of the latest and most popular slang for time frame. From “hot minute” to “nanosecond,” we’ve got you covered with all the trendy ways to express time in today’s world. So, don’t waste another moment and dive into this listicle to level up your time-telling game!

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1. Jiffy

A jiffy refers to an extremely brief moment or an instant. It is often used to indicate a short amount of time.

  • For example, “I’ll be back in a jiffy” means the person will return quickly.
  • In a conversation about cooking, someone might say, “This recipe will be ready in a jiffy.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you finish that task in a jiffy?”

2. Tick

Tick is a slang term for a moment or a second. It is often used to emphasize the passing of time.

  • For instance, “Just give me a tick, I’ll be right with you” means the person will attend to the request shortly.
  • In a discussion about deadlines, someone might say, “We’re running out of tick, we need to hurry.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Wait a tick, I need to grab my keys!”

3. Split second

A split second refers to an extremely brief and almost instantaneous moment. It is often used to describe something that happens very quickly.

  • For example, “He made a split-second decision” means he made a quick and immediate choice.
  • In a conversation about reflexes, someone might say, “I reacted in a split second.”
  • A person might describe a close call by saying, “I avoided the accident by a split second.”

4. Nano

Nano is a slang term derived from the prefix “nano-” which denotes one billionth of a unit. In the context of time, it is used to describe an incredibly small fraction of a second.

  • For instance, “He finished the race in a nano” means he completed it in an extremely short time.
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might say, “This computer can perform calculations in nanoseconds.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you react in a nano?”

5. Hot minute

Hot minute is a slang term used to describe a relatively long period of time. It is often used to emphasize the length or duration of an interval.

  • For example, “I haven’t seen you in a hot minute” means it has been a long time since the last meeting.
  • In a conversation about waiting, someone might say, “I’ve been waiting for a hot minute.”
  • A person might exclaim, “It took a hot minute to finish that project!”

6. New York minute

This slang phrase refers to a very short amount of time, often emphasizing the fast-paced nature of life in New York City. It implies that something happens or is done in a very short period.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in a New York minute” means the person will arrive quickly.
  • In a conversation about deadlines, someone might say, “I need that report done in a New York minute.”
  • Another usage could be, “She finished the race in a New York minute, setting a new record.”

7. Donkey’s years

This slang phrase is used to describe a significant amount of time, emphasizing its length. It suggests that something hasn’t happened or been done for a long time.

  • For instance, “I haven’t seen him in donkey’s years” means the person hasn’t been seen for a long time.
  • In a conversation about a reunion, someone might say, “It’s been donkey’s years since we last met.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’ve been waiting for this opportunity for donkey’s years.”

8. Yonks

This slang term is used to describe a considerable period of time, often implying a sense of waiting or anticipation. It suggests that something hasn’t happened or been done for a long time.

  • For example, “I haven’t been to the beach in yonks” means the person hasn’t visited the beach for a long time.
  • In a conversation about a job promotion, someone might say, “I’ve been working here for yonks and finally got recognized.”
  • Another usage could be, “I’ve been studying this subject for yonks and still feel like there’s so much more to learn.”

9. Eon

This slang term is used to describe a vast amount of time, often suggesting a duration that is beyond normal human lifespans. It emphasizes the immensity of the time frame.

  • For instance, “It feels like I’ve been waiting for the bus for an eon” means the person has been waiting for an excessively long time.
  • In a conversation about history, someone might say, “That event happened eons ago.”
  • Another usage could be, “I haven’t seen that movie in eons.”

10. Flash

This slang term refers to a brief moment or a very short duration of time. It suggests that something happens or is done quickly, often with a sense of urgency or immediacy.

  • For example, “I’ll be back in a flash” means the person will return quickly.
  • In a conversation about a race, someone might say, “He finished the marathon in a flash.”
  • Another usage could be, “The opportunity to buy tickets sold out in a flash.”

11. Coon’s age

This phrase is used to refer to a very long period of time. It is derived from the saying “as old as a raccoon’s age,” which implies that raccoons live for a long time.

  • For example, “I haven’t seen you in a coon’s age!”
  • In a conversation about waiting, someone might say, “I’ve been waiting for the bus for a coon’s age.”
  • When reminiscing about the past, one might say, “I remember when we used to play in the park in a coon’s age.”

12. Mo

A shortened version of the word “month.” It is often used in casual conversations or online chats to refer to a specific month.

  • For instance, “See you next mo!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be on vacation next mo.”
  • When discussing plans, someone might ask, “Are you free next mo?”

13. Shake

Used to describe a brief or short amount of time. It can refer to a few seconds, minutes, or even hours.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in a shake!”
  • When discussing a quick task, someone might say, “I can finish it in a shake.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you wait for me? It’ll only take a shake.”

14. Dog’s age

Similar to “coon’s age,” this phrase is used to describe a lengthy period of time. It is derived from the idea that dogs have shorter lifespans compared to humans.

  • For instance, “I haven’t seen you in a dog’s age!”
  • When catching up with a friend, someone might say, “What have you been up to in a dog’s age?”
  • A person might mention, “I’ve been working on this project for a dog’s age.”

15. Split

Used to describe the act of leaving or departing quickly. It implies a sense of urgency or haste.

  • For example, “I have to split, I’m running late!”
  • When saying goodbye to someone, someone might say, “I’ll split now, see you later.”
  • A person might mention, “I split as soon as the meeting ended.”

16. Eternity

This refers to a period of time that is extremely long or seems never-ending. It is often used to emphasize the concept of an infinite or endless duration.

  • For example, “Waiting for the bus felt like an eternity.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll love you for all eternity.”
  • In a discussion about the universe, someone might ponder, “What if the universe has existed for eternity?”

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or is done in an extremely short amount of time. It implies that the action or event occurred so quickly that it was almost imperceptible.

  • For instance, “The race was over in the blink of an eye.”
  • A person might say, “He disappeared in the blink of an eye.”
  • In a conversation about a fast car, someone might comment, “That car can go from 0 to 60 in the blink of an eye.”

18. Dog’s life

This expression is used to describe a life that has been challenging or full of hardship. It implies that the person or animal has experienced a lot of difficulties and struggles.

  • For example, “She’s had a real dog’s life, always fighting to survive.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t want to live a dog’s life, always working and never enjoying life.”
  • In a discussion about a historical figure, someone might comment, “He lived a dog’s life, constantly at war and facing danger.”

19. Min

This is a shortened form of the word “minute” and is used to refer to a very short amount of time. It is often used in casual conversation or informal writing.

  • For instance, “I’ll be there in a min.”
  • A person might say, “Just give me a min to finish this task.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you call me in a min?”

20. Century

This term refers to a period of 100 years. It is often used to describe a long span of time or to refer to a specific era in history.

  • For example, “The 20th century was a time of great change.”
  • A person might say, “It feels like it’s been a century since I last saw you.”
  • In a discussion about technology, someone might comment, “We’ve come a long way in just a century.”

21. In a New York minute

This phrase means to do something in a very short amount of time, similar to how things move quickly in New York City. It implies that something happens or gets done rapidly.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in a New York minute!” means the person will arrive very quickly.
  • If someone says, “I finished that report in a New York minute,” it means they completed it very fast.
  • A person might say, “She changed her mind in a New York minute,” meaning she quickly changed her opinion.
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22. In the blink of an eye

This phrase means to do something or for something to happen very quickly, so fast that it seems almost instantaneous. It refers to the quickness of blinking one’s eye.

  • For instance, “The thief was gone in the blink of an eye,” means the person disappeared very quickly.
  • If someone says, “The car accident happened in the blink of an eye,” it means the collision occurred very fast.
  • A person might say, “She finished the race in the blink of an eye,” meaning she completed it very quickly.

23. In the nick of time

This phrase means to do something or for something to happen just before it’s too late or at the last possible moment. It implies that something is done in the exact moment it needs to be done.

  • For example, “He arrived in the nick of time to catch the train,” means he got there just before the train departed.
  • If someone says, “I finished the project in the nick of time,” it means they completed it just before the deadline.
  • A person might say, “She rescued the cat in the nick of time,” meaning she saved the cat just before it was too late.

24. In no time

This phrase means to do something or for something to happen very quickly or without any delay. It implies that there is no waiting or wasting of time.

  • For instance, “He fixed the broken faucet in no time,” means he repaired it very quickly.
  • If someone says, “The pizza arrived in no time,” it means the delivery was very fast.
  • A person might say, “She finished her homework in no time,” meaning she completed it quickly.

25. In the twinkle of an eye

This phrase means to do something or for something to happen very quickly, almost instantaneously. It refers to the speed of a twinkle, which is a very fast and brief movement of light.

  • For example, “He disappeared in the twinkle of an eye,” means he vanished very quickly.
  • If someone says, “The fireworks exploded in the twinkle of an eye,” it means they burst into colorful lights rapidly.
  • A person might say, “She solved the puzzle in the twinkle of an eye,” meaning she figured it out very quickly.

26. In the bat of an eye

This phrase is used to describe something that happens very quickly or in an instant.

  • For example, “He disappeared in the bat of an eye.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be there in the bat of an eye.”
  • Another example could be, “The car sped past in the bat of an eye.”

27. In two shakes of a lamb’s tail

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen very soon or quickly.

  • For instance, “I’ll be there in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.”
  • A person might say, “I finished the project in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.”
  • Another example could be, “He fixed the issue in two shakes of a lamb’s tail.”

28. In a trice

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or will happen very quickly or in an instant.

  • For example, “He finished the race in a trice.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be back in a trice.”
  • Another example could be, “She solved the puzzle in a trice.”

29. In a split second

This phrase is used to describe something that happens or will happen immediately or instantly.

  • For instance, “He made the decision in a split second.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be there in a split second.”
  • Another example could be, “She dodged the bullet in a split second.”

30. In a moment

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen shortly or soon.

  • For example, “I’ll be with you in a moment.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be ready in a moment.”
  • Another example could be, “She’ll be here in a moment.”

31. In a hurry

This phrase is used to indicate that something needs to be done quickly or that someone is in a rush.

  • For example, “I need to finish this report in a hurry.”
  • Someone might say, “Sorry, I can’t talk right now. I’m in a hurry.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please help me? I’m in a hurry to catch my train.”

32. In a rush

Similar to “in a hurry,” this phrase indicates that something needs to be done quickly or that someone is in a hurry.

  • For instance, “I’m in a rush to get to my appointment.”
  • Someone might say, “Sorry for the mess, I was in a rush this morning.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please grab me a coffee? I’m in a rush.”

33. In a tick

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or be done shortly.

  • For example, “I’ll be with you in a tick.”
  • Someone might say, “Just hold on, I’ll be there in a tick.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please wait? I’ll be ready in a tick.”

34. In a sec

Similar to “in a tick,” this phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or be done shortly.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, just need to grab something in a sec.”
  • Someone might say, “Can you please hold on? I’ll be there in a sec.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please pass me the salt? I’ll give it back in a sec.”

35. In a minute

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen or be done in a short amount of time.

  • For example, “I’ll be ready to leave in a minute.”
  • Someone might say, “Just give me a minute, I’ll be right with you.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you please wait? I’ll be done in a minute.”

36. In a second

This phrase is used to indicate that something will happen very quickly or in a short amount of time.

  • For example, if someone asks, “Can you grab me a drink?” You might respond, “Sure, I’ll be back in a second.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up with a friend, you might say, “I’ll be there in a second, just finishing up something.”
  • Someone might tell you, “Hold on, I’ll be with you in a second.”

37. In a mo

This expression is used to mean that something will happen shortly or in a brief amount of time.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “Can you pass me the salt?” You might reply, “Sure, just a mo.”
  • In a conversation about getting ready to leave, you might say, “I’ll be ready to go in a mo.”
  • Someone might tell you, “I’ll be with you in a mo, just need to finish this task.”

38. In a bit

This phrase suggests that something will happen after a short period of time or after a brief delay.

  • For example, if someone asks, “When will dinner be ready?” You might respond, “In a bit, just need to finish cooking.”
  • In a conversation about meeting up with a friend, you might say, “I’ll be there in a bit, just need to run an errand.”
  • Someone might tell you, “Hang on, I’ll be done in a bit.”

39. In a while

This expression indicates that something will happen after a period of time, without specifying the exact duration.

  • For instance, if someone asks, “When will you be back?” You might reply, “In a while, still have some things to take care of.”
  • In a conversation about waiting for a response, you might say, “They said they’ll get back to us in a while.”
  • Someone might tell you, “I’ll be ready to leave in a while, just need to finish getting ready.”

40. In a day or two

This phrase suggests that something will happen within a short timeframe, typically within one or two days.

  • For example, if someone asks, “When can I expect the package to arrive?” You might respond, “In a day or two, depending on the shipping.”
  • In a conversation about making plans, you might say, “Let’s finalize the details in a day or two.”
  • Someone might tell you, “I’ll have the report ready in a day or two, just need to gather some more information.”

41. In a week or two

– For example, “I’ll have the report ready for you in a week or two.”

  • Someone might say, “We should hear back from them in a week or two.”
  • A person making plans might say, “Let’s schedule the meeting in a week or two from now.”

42. In a wink

– For instance, “I’ll finish this task in a wink.”

  • A person might say, “He fixed the problem in a wink.”
  • Someone might comment, “The car passed by in a wink.”

43. In the eleventh hour

– For example, “They submitted the proposal in the eleventh hour.”

  • A person might say, “I always finish my assignments in the eleventh hour.”
  • Someone might comment, “He arrived at the meeting in the eleventh hour.”

44. Before you know it

– For instance, “The weekend will be over before you know it.”

  • A person might say, “The holidays will be here before you know it.”
  • Someone might comment, “Time flies, and before you know it, you’re old.”

45. Before long

– For example, “She’ll be home before long.”

  • A person might say, “We’ll have the results before long.”
  • Someone might comment, “Before long, we’ll see the sun rise.”

46. Any minute now

This phrase is used to express that something is expected to happen very soon, often implying that it could happen at any moment.

  • For example, “The bus should be here any minute now.”
  • A person waiting for a package might say, “The delivery should arrive any minute now.”
  • In a suspenseful situation, someone might say, “I feel like something is going to happen any minute now.”

47. Any day now

This phrase is used to indicate that something is expected to happen soon, without specifying an exact time frame.

  • For instance, “The baby is due any day now.”
  • A person waiting for test results might say, “I should be hearing back from the doctor any day now.”
  • In a conversation about a pending promotion, someone might say, “I’m hoping to hear back about the job offer any day now.”

48. Any moment now

This phrase is used to convey that something is expected to happen very soon, emphasizing that it could occur at any moment.

  • For example, “The fireworks show should start any moment now.”
  • A person waiting for a phone call might say, “I’m expecting an important call any moment now.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “The runners are approaching the finish line. Any moment now, we’ll have a winner.”

49. In the near future

This phrase refers to a time frame that is relatively close or not too far off in the future.

  • For instance, “We’re planning to release the new product in the near future.”
  • A person discussing upcoming travel plans might say, “I’m hoping to visit Europe in the near future.”
  • In a conversation about career goals, someone might say, “I want to advance in my field in the near future.”

50. In the foreseeable future

This phrase is used to express that something is expected to happen within a time frame that can be reasonably predicted or anticipated.

  • For example, “We don’t have any vacation plans in the foreseeable future.”
  • A person discussing technological advancements might say, “Self-driving cars will become mainstream in the foreseeable future.”
  • In a conversation about retirement, someone might say, “I want to save enough money to live comfortably in the foreseeable future.”

51. In the not too distant future

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen in the near future, but not immediately. It implies that the event or action is not far off, but still requires some time.

  • For example, “We can expect to see flying cars in the not too distant future.”
  • A person discussing technological advancements might say, “In the not too distant future, virtual reality will be a part of everyday life.”
  • Another might speculate, “I believe that renewable energy will become the primary source of power in the not too distant future.”

52. In the coming days

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen within a short period of time, usually within a few days. It implies that the event or action is imminent.

  • For instance, “We will receive the test results in the coming days.”
  • A person discussing a planned event might say, “In the coming days, we will finalize the details and send out invitations.”
  • Another might anticipate, “I’m excited to see what the coming days have in store for us.”

53. In the coming weeks

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen within a relatively short period of time, usually within a few weeks. It implies that the event or action is on the horizon.

  • For example, “We will announce the winner of the competition in the coming weeks.”
  • A person discussing a project timeline might say, “In the coming weeks, we will be focusing on finalizing the design.”
  • Another might plan, “I’m going on vacation in the coming weeks, so I need to finish my work before then.”

54. In the coming months

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen within a relatively short period of time, usually within a few months. It implies that the event or action is approaching.

  • For instance, “We will be launching the new product in the coming months.”
  • A person discussing travel plans might say, “In the coming months, I’m planning to visit several countries.”
  • Another might set goals, “I want to learn a new language in the coming months.”

55. In the coming years

This phrase is used to describe something that will happen within a relatively short period of time, usually within a few years. It implies that the event or action is within reach.

  • For example, “We will see significant advancements in technology in the coming years.”
  • A person discussing career plans might say, “In the coming years, I hope to advance to a managerial position.”
  • Another might make predictions, “I believe renewable energy will become the primary source of power in the coming years.”

56. Down the road

This phrase refers to something that will happen at a later time, usually in the distant future. It implies a long-term perspective or a delay in achieving something.

  • For example, “We might not see the results now, but down the road, our hard work will pay off.”
  • In a discussion about career goals, someone might say, “I want to start my own business down the road.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “Think about your decisions carefully, as they can impact your life down the road.”

57. In the long run

This phrase means considering the overall or final outcome of a situation, rather than focusing on short-term results. It suggests that the true value or impact of something will be seen over time.

  • For instance, “Taking care of your health is important in the long run.”
  • In a conversation about investments, someone might say, “In the long run, stocks tend to provide higher returns than bonds.”
  • A coach might motivate their team by saying, “Work hard and stay disciplined. It will pay off in the long run.”

58. In due time

This phrase indicates that something will happen at the right moment or according to a schedule. It implies patience and trust in the timing of events.

  • For example, “Don’t worry, your efforts will be rewarded in due time.”
  • When waiting for a response, someone might say, “I’m sure they will get back to us in due time.”
  • A teacher might remind their students, “Study consistently, and you will see improvement in due time.”

59. Sooner or later

This phrase suggests that something will happen at some point in the future, without specifying exactly when. It implies an inevitability or certainty.

  • For instance, “If you keep procrastinating, sooner or later, you’ll have to face the consequences.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “If it’s meant to be, we’ll find each other again sooner or later.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “You can’t avoid responsibilities forever. Sooner or later, you’ll have to take them seriously.”

60. In the meantime

This phrase refers to the period of time between two events or actions. It suggests that while waiting for something to happen, other things are occurring.

  • For example, “We’re still waiting for the final decision. In the meantime, let’s focus on our current tasks.”
  • When someone is on hold during a phone call, they might hear, “Thank you for your patience. In the meantime, feel free to browse our website.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “The test results will be available tomorrow. In the meantime, continue with your assignments.”

61. In the interim

This phrase is used to refer to the period of time between two events or actions. It indicates that something will happen or be done temporarily until a longer-term solution or plan is in place.

  • For example, “We don’t have a permanent CEO yet, so John will be acting as CEO in the interim.”
  • A manager might say, “We’re still waiting for the new software to be installed. In the interim, we’ll continue to use the old system.”
  • In a discussion about a pending decision, someone might suggest, “Let’s gather more information before making a final choice. In the interim, we can proceed with the current plan.”