Top 51 Slang For Get – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the act of “get,” the English language has a plethora of slang words and phrases that add a unique flavor to our conversations. From casual conversations to pop culture references, these expressions capture the essence of getting things done in a fun and relatable way. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang words and phrases for “get” that you need to know to stay up-to-date with the latest linguistic trends. Get ready to expand your vocabulary and impress your friends with this comprehensive guide!

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1. Get someone’s drift

To understand or comprehend someone’s meaning or intention. This phrase is often used when someone is trying to explain something and wants to make sure the listener understands.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex concept, they might ask, “Do you get my drift?”
  • In a conversation about a movie’s plot twist, one person might say, “I didn’t get the villain’s drift until the end.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you get the drift of this math problem?”

2. Get a bang/kick out of someone or something

To derive pleasure, excitement, or amusement from someone or something. This phrase is often used when someone finds something funny or entertaining.

  • For instance, if someone tells a funny joke, they might say, “I really got a kick out of that.”
  • When watching a comedy show, someone might say, “I always get a bang out of this comedian’s performances.”
  • A person might say, “I get a kick out of watching cat videos on the internet.”

3. Get a life!

An exclamation used to tell someone to stop being boring or uninteresting and to find something more fulfilling or purposeful to do with their time.

  • For example, if someone is spending too much time playing video games, a friend might say, “Get a life!”
  • In a discussion about hobbies, someone might say, “I love gardening. It’s a great way to get a life.”
  • A person might comment on someone’s lack of social activities by saying, “They really need to get a life.”

4. Get the hang of

To become familiar with or understand how to do something. This phrase is often used when someone is learning a new skill or activity.

  • For instance, if someone is learning to play the guitar, they might say, “I’m starting to get the hang of it.”
  • In a conversation about driving a manual transmission car, someone might say, “It took me a while, but I finally got the hang of shifting gears.”
  • A person might offer encouragement by saying, “Don’t worry, you’ll get the hang of it with practice.”

5. Get the picture

To understand or comprehend the situation or concept being discussed. This phrase is often used when someone wants to make sure the listener understands.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complicated plan, they might ask, “Do you get the picture?”
  • In a discussion about a movie’s plot, one person might say, “I didn’t get the picture until the climax.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Do you get the picture of how the water cycle works?”

6. Get a grip

This phrase is used to tell someone to calm down or regain control of their emotions or behavior. It can also be used to advise someone to handle a situation more effectively.

  • For example, if someone is panicking, you might say, “Get a grip! Everything will be okay.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “We need to get a grip and think clearly about our next move.”
  • When someone is overreacting, you could say, “You’re blowing this out of proportion. Get a grip!”

7. Get a move on

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry or move faster. It is often used when someone is taking too long to get ready or start doing something.

  • For instance, if someone is running late, you might say, “Come on, get a move on! We don’t have much time.”
  • If someone is procrastinating, you could say, “Stop wasting time and get a move on with your work.”
  • When someone is being slow, you might say, “We need to leave soon. Get a move on!”

8. Get the ball rolling

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start a task or initiate a process. It is often used when there is a delay or hesitation in getting things started.

  • For example, if a meeting is about to begin, you might say, “Let’s get the ball rolling and start discussing the agenda.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “We need someone to take charge and get the ball rolling on this assignment.”
  • When planning an event, you could say, “We have a lot to do. Let’s get the ball rolling and start organizing.”

9. Get the show on the road

This phrase is used to encourage or urge someone to start an activity or event. It is often used when there is a delay or when people are taking too long to begin.

  • For instance, if a performance is about to start, you might say, “Let’s get the show on the road. The audience is waiting.”
  • In a sports game, someone might say, “The clock is ticking. It’s time to get the show on the road and start playing.”
  • When preparing for a trip, you could say, “We’ve packed everything. Let’s get the show on the road and start our journey.”

10. Get cracking

This phrase is used to tell someone to start working or get busy with a task. It is often used to encourage prompt action or to express a sense of urgency.

  • For example, if someone is procrastinating, you might say, “Stop wasting time and get cracking on your assignment.”
  • In a team setting, someone might say, “We have a deadline to meet. Let’s get cracking and finish this project.”
  • When starting a new project, you could say, “We have a lot of work ahead. Let’s get cracking and make progress.”

11. Get lost

This phrase is used to tell someone to leave or to dismiss them. It can be used in a literal sense or as a way to express frustration or annoyance.

  • For example, if someone is bothering you, you might say, “Get lost, I’m not interested.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say to the other, “Why don’t you just get lost and leave me alone?”
  • If someone is lost and asking for directions, you might say, “Just keep going straight and you’ll eventually get lost.”

12. Get out of hand

This phrase is used to describe a situation that has become chaotic or difficult to manage. It implies that things have escalated beyond what was initially expected or intended.

  • For instance, if a party becomes rowdy and people start breaking things, you might say, “Things really got out of hand.”
  • In a discussion about a protest turning violent, someone might comment, “The situation quickly got out of hand.”
  • If a project at work becomes overwhelming and disorganized, a colleague might say, “This project has gotten completely out of hand.”

13. Get off the hook

This phrase is used to describe someone who has managed to avoid a negative consequence or responsibility. It implies that the person has been let off or released from a difficult or uncomfortable situation.

  • For example, if someone is accused of a crime but is found not guilty, they might say, “I’m glad I got off the hook.”
  • In a discussion about someone avoiding a difficult task, one person might say, “She always finds a way to get off the hook.”
  • If a student forgets to do their homework but the teacher doesn’t notice, the student might say, “I got off the hook this time.”

14. Get on someone’s nerves

This phrase is used to describe behavior or actions that bother or irritate someone. It implies that someone’s actions are causing frustration or discomfort to another person.

  • For instance, if someone is constantly tapping their foot and it’s bothering you, you might say, “Stop tapping your foot, it’s getting on my nerves.”
  • In a discussion about a coworker who talks loudly on the phone, someone might say, “Her constant phone conversations really get on my nerves.”
  • If a sibling keeps teasing and provoking their brother or sister, a parent might say, “You need to stop, you’re getting on your sister’s nerves.”

15. Get the message

This phrase is used to describe someone who has understood or comprehended a message or instruction. It implies that someone has received and processed information.

  • For example, if you explain something to someone and they respond with, “I get the message,” it means they understand.
  • In a conversation about someone finally understanding a hint, one person might say, “He finally got the message about what I was trying to say.”
  • If someone is repeatedly told to do something and they finally comply, you might say, “I think she finally got the message.”

16. Get a taste of

To have a brief experience or sample of something.

  • For example, “I got a taste of the nightlife in New York City during my visit.”
  • A food lover might say, “You have to get a taste of their famous chocolate cake.”
  • Someone trying a new hobby might exclaim, “I finally got a taste of rock climbing and I loved it!”

17. Get the drift

To comprehend or understand the meaning or intention behind something.

  • For instance, “I explained the joke to him, but he still didn’t get the drift.”
  • During a conversation, someone might ask, “Do you get the drift of what I’m saying?”
  • In a group discussion, a participant might say, “Let me break it down so everyone gets the drift.”

18. Get a kick out of

To find great enjoyment or amusement in something.

  • For example, “I always get a kick out of watching funny cat videos.”
  • A person attending a comedy show might say, “I guarantee you’ll get a kick out of the comedian’s jokes.”
  • A friend might share a funny story and say, “You’re going to get a kick out of this!”

19. Get a grip on

To gain control or understanding of a situation or concept.

  • For instance, “I need to get a grip on my finances and start budgeting.”
  • A student struggling with a difficult subject might say, “I can’t seem to get a grip on calculus.”
  • During a heated argument, someone might shout, “Get a grip on yourself and calm down!”

20. Get the upper hand

To gain control or an advantage over someone or something.

  • For example, “The team made a comeback and got the upper hand in the game.”
  • A businessperson discussing negotiations might say, “We need to get the upper hand in the upcoming deal.”
  • During a dispute, one party might say, “I won’t let them get the upper hand in this argument.”

21. Get the hint

This phrase is used when someone finally understands an indirect message or suggestion that was meant for them.

  • For example, “After she ignored his texts for weeks, he finally got the hint and stopped contacting her.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s behavior, someone might say, “I’ve been dropping hints about how much I like her, but she just doesn’t get the hint.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I can’t believe it took him so long to get the hint that I wasn’t interested!”

22. Get the scoop

To “get the scoop” means to gather or obtain the latest information or news about something.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I need to get the scoop on this breaking news story.”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “Have you heard? I need to get the scoop on what happened.”
  • A person might say, “I always go to her for the latest gossip. She always gets the scoop before anyone else.”

23. Get the jitters

To “get the jitters” means to start feeling nervous or anxious about something.

  • For example, “Before a big performance, many actors and musicians get the jitters.”
  • In a discussion about public speaking, someone might say, “I always get the jitters before giving a presentation.”
  • A person might admit, “I get the jitters every time I have to meet new people.”

24. Get the munchies

To “get the munchies” means to suddenly feel hungry, often due to the effects of marijuana.

  • For instance, “After smoking, I always get the munchies and crave snacks.”
  • In a conversation about late-night cravings, someone might say, “I always get the munchies around midnight.”
  • A person might joke, “I can’t watch a movie without getting the munchies halfway through.”

25. Get the blues

To “get the blues” means to feel sad or depressed.

  • For example, “After her breakup, she really got the blues.”
  • In a discussion about emotional states, someone might say, “I often get the blues during the winter months.”
  • A person might admit, “Sometimes I just get the blues for no reason at all.”

26. Score

To successfully obtain or achieve something. “Score” is often used to indicate success or accomplishment in a specific context.

  • For example, a sports fan might say, “Our team scored a touchdown in the final seconds of the game.”
  • In a conversation about job interviews, someone might mention, “I scored an amazing job offer from that company.”
  • A student might exclaim, “I scored an A on my final exam!”

27. Grab

To quickly take hold of something or someone. “Grab” implies a swift and decisive action.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Let’s grab some pizza for dinner.”
  • In a crowded store, someone might ask, “Can you grab that item from the top shelf for me?”
  • A person rushing to catch a bus might yell, “Wait, I need to grab my bag!”

28. Cop

To acquire or obtain something, typically through a transaction or exchange. “Cop” is often used in street slang or informal contexts.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to cop a new pair of sneakers.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might ask, “Where can I cop that new album?”
  • A teenager might brag, “I just copped the latest video game.”

29. Obtain

To acquire or come into possession of something. “Obtain” suggests a deliberate effort to acquire something.

  • For instance, a lawyer might say, “We need to obtain a copy of the contract for review.”
  • In a discussion about research, someone might mention, “It’s important to obtain accurate data for the study.”
  • A person looking for a specific item might ask, “Where can I obtain a replacement part?”

30. Acquire

To obtain or come into possession of something, typically through effort or action. “Acquire” implies a deliberate action to obtain something.

  • For example, a businessperson might say, “We need to acquire new clients to expand our customer base.”
  • In a conversation about language learning, someone might mention, “I want to acquire fluency in French.”
  • A collector might proudly state, “I’ve acquired a rare piece for my art collection.”

31. Secure

To obtain or acquire something, often with effort or difficulty. “Secure” can be used to describe successfully obtaining something that was desired or sought after.

  • For example, “I managed to secure tickets to the sold-out concert.”
  • A person might say, “I need to secure a loan in order to buy a new car.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We secured a new client for the company.”

32. Snag

To obtain or acquire something, often unexpectedly or by chance. “Snag” is used to describe getting something that was not necessarily sought after or planned for.

  • For instance, “I managed to snag the last pair of shoes in my size on sale.”
  • A person might say, “I snagged a great deal on a used car.”
  • In a conversation about finding a new apartment, someone might say, “I snagged a great apartment in the city.”

33. Bag

To obtain or acquire something, often with success or accomplishment. “Bag” is a term used to describe successfully getting something that was desired or targeted.

  • For example, “I finally bagged the job I’ve been dreaming of.”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to bag a promotion this year.”
  • In a discussion about dating, someone might say, “I managed to bag a date with my crush.”

34. Procure

To obtain or acquire something, often through effort or action. “Procure” is a formal term used to describe obtaining something, often with intention or purpose.

  • For instance, “She managed to procure a rare book for her collection.”
  • A person might say, “I need to procure some supplies for the project.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We have successfully procured a new supplier for our company.”

35. Attain

To obtain or acquire something, often through effort or accomplishment. “Attain” is used to describe successfully obtaining something that was desired or worked towards.

  • For example, “He was able to attain his goal of running a marathon.”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to attain a high level of success in my career.”
  • In a conversation about personal growth, someone might say, “I want to attain inner peace and happiness.”

36. Fetch

To acquire or obtain something.

  • For example, “I need to fetch my keys before we leave.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll fetch some drinks from the fridge.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “I fetched a great deal on this dress.”

37. Garner

To gather or collect something, usually in large amounts.

  • For instance, “The movie garnered a lot of attention and critical acclaim.”
  • In a discussion about awards, someone might say, “The actor has garnered multiple nominations for his performances.”
  • A person might say, “She has garnered a lot of experience in her field over the years.”

38. Net

To obtain or achieve something, often with effort.

  • For example, “He netted a promotion after working hard for several years.”
  • In a conversation about goals, someone might say, “I’m determined to net a scholarship for college.”
  • A person might say, “The team needs to net a victory in their next game.”

39. Land

To obtain or achieve something, typically after effort or struggle.

  • For instance, “He landed a job at a prestigious company.”
  • In a discussion about real estate, someone might say, “I’m hoping to land a great deal on a house.”
  • A person might say, “She landed a prominent role in the play.”

40. Snatch

To take or obtain something quickly or forcefully.

  • For example, “She snatched the last piece of cake before anyone else could.”
  • In a conversation about sales, someone might say, “I snatched a great deal on this jacket.”
  • A person might say, “He snatched the opportunity to lead the project.”

41. Seize

To take control of something or someone forcefully or quickly.
-For example, “The police seized the drugs during a raid on the warehouse.”
-In a business context, one might say, “We need to seize this opportunity to expand our market share.”
-A sports commentator might say, “The team seized the lead in the final minutes of the game.”

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42. Win

To be victorious or successful in a competition or endeavor.
-For instance, “The team worked hard and managed to win the championship.”
-In a debate, one might argue, “It’s not about winning the argument, but finding a solution.”
-A person might say, “I finally won the lottery after playing for years.”

43. Capture

To catch or take possession of something or someone, often after a pursuit or effort.
-For example, “The photographer captured a stunning image of a sunset.”
-In a military context, one might say, “The troops captured the enemy stronghold.”
-A wildlife enthusiast might say, “I managed to capture a rare bird on camera.”

44. Nail

To successfully accomplish or achieve something.
-For instance, “She nailed the presentation and impressed the clients.”
-In a cooking show, one might say, “I’m confident I can nail this recipe.”
-A person might say, “I nailed the interview and got the job.”

45. Achieve

To successfully reach or attain a goal or desired outcome.
-For example, “He achieved his dream of becoming a published author.”
-In a personal development context, one might say, “Setting clear goals is key to achieving success.”
-A person might say, “I want to achieve financial independence by the age of 40.”

46. Baggage

To obtain or acquire something. This slang term is often used to refer to getting something, typically in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I need to baggage some groceries from the store.”
  • In a conversation about shopping, someone might say, “I’m going to baggage a new pair of shoes tomorrow.”
  • Another person might ask, “Can you baggage me a coffee on your way back?”

47. Gain

To obtain or achieve something, often in terms of personal growth or progress. This slang term is commonly used to express the act of getting something positive or beneficial.

  • For instance, “I’m trying to gain more followers on social media.”
  • In a discussion about fitness, someone might say, “I want to gain more muscle mass.”
  • Another person might comment, “She’s been working hard to gain recognition in her field.”

48. Scoop

To acquire or obtain information, often through sources or sources. This slang term is frequently used to describe the act of getting the latest news or inside information.

  • For example, “I heard a rumor, let me scoop the details for you.”
  • In a conversation about celebrity gossip, someone might say, “Did you hear about the scandal? I need to scoop all the details.”
  • Another person might ask, “Can you scoop any information about the upcoming event?”

49. Pocket

To take possession of something, often in a discreet or sneaky manner. This slang term is commonly used to describe the act of getting something for oneself, typically without others knowing.

  • For instance, “He managed to pocket some extra cash from the transaction.”
  • In a discussion about finding a good deal, someone might say, “I pocketed a great discount on this item.”
  • Another person might comment, “She’s always pocketing free samples from stores.”

50. Retrieve

To get or fetch something that was previously lost, misplaced, or unavailable. This slang term is often used to describe the act of getting something back or bringing something back to its original location.

  • For example, “I need to retrieve my keys from the car.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “I can easily retrieve the deleted files from the recycle bin.”
  • Another person might ask, “Can you retrieve the document from the printer?”

51. Source

To obtain or acquire something, often used in the context of obtaining information or finding something.

  • For example, “I need to source some new material for my article.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m trying to source information about the latest political scandal.”
  • In a discussion about cooking, someone might ask, “Where can I source fresh ingredients for this recipe?”