Top 51 Slang For Getting Out Of Jail – Meaning & Usage

Finding yourself in a sticky situation and needing to navigate the intricacies of the legal system can be overwhelming. But fear not, because we’ve got your back! In this listicle, we’ve compiled a collection of the most clever and amusing slang terms used to describe the art of getting out of jail. From “jailbreak” to “bust out,” we’ve got you covered with the lingo that will have you feeling like a seasoned pro in no time. So sit back, relax, and let us guide you through the world of slang for getting out of jail.

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1. Bailed out

When someone pays a certain amount of money to secure their release from jail before their trial or sentencing.

  • For example, “After his arrest, his family bailed him out of jail.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity bailed out of jail after DUI arrest.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I can’t believe he bailed out of jail so quickly.”

2. Walked

When someone is released from jail without being charged with a crime.

  • For instance, “The suspect walked out of jail after the police couldn’t find enough evidence.”
  • In a news report, it might say, “The accused murderer walked free due to lack of evidence.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He got lucky and walked out of jail without any charges.”

3. Freed

When someone is released from jail after serving their sentence or when their charges are dropped.

  • For example, “After 10 years in prison, he was finally freed.”
  • A news headline might read, “Innocent man freed after DNA evidence exonerates him.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He paid his dues and was eventually freed from jail.”

4. Released on parole

When someone is released from jail before completing their full sentence but is still under supervision and must follow certain conditions set by the parole board.

  • For instance, “He was released on parole after serving half of his sentence.”
  • In a news report, it might say, “Convicted felon released on parole, subject to strict monitoring.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He’s out on parole now, but he has to follow all the rules.”

5. Got off

When someone is able to avoid punishment or being convicted of a crime.

  • For example, “He got off with just a warning instead of going to jail.”
  • A news headline might read, “Accused murderer got off due to lack of evidence.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “He thought he would go to jail, but he got off with a fine instead.”

6. Escaped

This term refers to the act of getting out of jail or prison without authorization. It implies that the person has evaded capture and is now on the run.

  • For example, “The notorious criminal escaped from prison last night.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “Authorities are searching for the escaped prisoner.”
  • A person discussing prison breaks might say, “Escaping from a maximum-security facility requires careful planning and execution.”

7. Pardoned

When someone is pardoned, it means that their punishment for a crime is completely forgiven. They are granted clemency and are no longer held responsible for the offense.

  • For instance, “The governor pardoned the prisoner, citing new evidence that proved their innocence.”
  • In a legal context, it might be stated, “The judge has the power to pardon a convicted individual.”
  • A person discussing the justice system might argue, “Pardoning someone can be a controversial decision, as it raises questions about accountability and fairness.”

8. Paroled

Parole refers to the conditional release of a prisoner before their full sentence is served. It allows them to serve the remainder of their sentence in the community, under supervision and certain conditions.

  • For example, “The inmate was paroled after serving half of their sentence.”
  • In a discussion about prison reform, one might say, “Parole can be an effective way to reintegrate individuals into society.”
  • A person discussing the benefits of parole might argue, “Allowing prisoners to serve part of their sentence under supervision can help reduce overcrowding in prisons.”

9. Released on probation

When someone is released on probation, it means they are allowed to serve their sentence outside of jail or prison, under specific conditions and supervision. Probation is granted as an alternative to incarceration.

  • For instance, “The judge decided to release the defendant on probation instead of sending them to jail.”
  • In a legal context, it might be stated, “Probation is often granted for non-violent offenses.”
  • A person discussing criminal justice might argue, “Probation allows individuals to maintain their freedom while still being held accountable for their actions.”

10. Set free

This term simply means that someone has been freed from jail or prison. It implies that they are no longer confined and can resume their life outside of the correctional facility.

  • For example, “After serving their sentence, the prisoner was set free.”
  • In a news report, it might be stated, “The wrongly accused individual was finally set free after new evidence emerged.”
  • A person discussing the importance of rehabilitation might say, “The goal of the justice system should be to help offenders reintegrate into society once they are set free.”

11. Discharged

When a person is released from jail or prison, they are said to be discharged. This term can also refer to the completion of a sentence or the end of a legal obligation.

  • For example, “After serving their time, the prisoner was discharged and allowed to return to society.”
  • A news headline might read, “Innocent man finally discharged after 20 years behind bars.”
  • In a conversation about criminal justice, someone might say, “Once you’re discharged, it’s important to rebuild your life and avoid falling back into old habits.”

12. Let go

To be let go means to be released from custody or allowed to leave a detention facility. This phrase can also imply a sense of freedom or liberation.

  • For instance, “The suspect was let go due to lack of evidence.”
  • In a discussion about wrongful arrests, someone might say, “Innocent people are often let go without any compensation for their time spent in jail.”
  • A person might use this phrase metaphorically and say, “I finally let go of my past mistakes and moved on with my life.”

13. Out on bail

When a person is released from jail after paying a certain amount of money as collateral, they are said to be out on bail. This means they are awaiting trial or further legal proceedings.

  • For example, “The accused was able to get out on bail thanks to the support of their family.”
  • In a news report about a high-profile case, it might be mentioned, “The suspect was released on bail, sparking public outrage.”
  • A person discussing the criminal justice system might say, “Many people who can’t afford bail end up staying in jail, even if they’re innocent.”

14. Walked free

To walk free means to be released from custody without facing any legal consequences. This phrase often implies a sense of luck or escaping punishment.

  • For instance, “Despite the evidence against them, the defendant walked free due to a technicality.”
  • In a conversation about corruption, someone might say, “Many powerful individuals walk free because of their connections.”
  • A person might use this phrase metaphorically and say, “I thought I would get in trouble for breaking the rules, but I walked free without any consequences.”

15. Exonerated

When a person is proven innocent or cleared of any wrongdoing, they are said to be exonerated. This term is often used when someone is released from prison after new evidence emerges or their conviction is overturned.

  • For example, “DNA evidence exonerated the wrongly convicted man after 30 years.”
  • In a news headline, it might be stated, “Innocent man exonerated after spending decades in prison.”
  • A person discussing the flaws in the criminal justice system might say, “There have been numerous cases where innocent individuals were exonerated years later.”

16. Get off

– For example, “The defendant was able to get off on a technicality.”

  • In a conversation about a court case, someone might say, “I hope the accused can get off with a light sentence.”
  • A person discussing their legal situation might say, “I’m hoping to hire a good lawyer to help me get off.”

17. Skedaddle

– For instance, “As soon as the guard turned his back, the prisoner skedaddled out of the jail.”

  • In a discussion about escaping from prison, someone might say, “If you want to survive, you need to skedaddle as soon as you get the chance.”
  • A person talking about their plan to escape might say, “I’m going to wait for the perfect moment and then skedaddle out of here.”

18. Break out

– For example, “The prisoners managed to break out of their cells and make a run for it.”

  • In a conversation about prison escapes, someone might say, “Breaking out of jail requires careful planning and execution.”
  • A person discussing their escape plan might say, “I’ve been studying the layout of the prison, and I think I’ve found a way to break out.”

19. Go free

– For instance, “After years of fighting for his innocence, he finally went free.”

  • In a discussion about wrongful convictions, someone might say, “It’s a tragedy when innocent people are denied the chance to go free.”
  • A person talking about their upcoming release might say, “I can’t wait to go free and start a new chapter in my life.”

20. Get out

– For example, “She was able to get out of jail on bail.”

  • In a conversation about someone’s legal situation, someone might say, “I’m hopeful that I can get out of this mess.”
  • A person discussing their release might say, “I’m counting down the days until I can finally get out.”

21. Skip town

This phrase means to quickly and secretly leave a place, often to avoid trouble or legal consequences.

  • For example, “After being released on bail, he decided to skip town before his trial.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might say, “If things go south, we’ll have to skip town and start fresh.”
  • A person discussing a fugitive might say, “The suspect managed to elude capture by skipping town and changing their identity.”

22. Fly the coop

This expression means to leave or escape from a place, especially a confined or controlled environment.

  • For instance, “The prisoner managed to fly the coop by digging a tunnel.”
  • In a prison break scenario, a character might say, “We need to find a way to fly the coop and get out of here.”
  • A person discussing escape plans might say, “If all else fails, we’ll have to fly the coop and make a run for it.”

23. Make a run for it

This phrase means to escape or flee from a situation, often hastily and without being caught.

  • For example, “When the guards were distracted, he decided to make a run for it.”
  • In a chase scene, a character might shout, “Let’s make a run for it and get out of here!”
  • A person discussing a daring escape might say, “We’ll have to create a diversion and then make a run for it.”

24. Bust out

This slang term means to escape or break free from jail or prison.

  • For instance, “The prisoner managed to bust out by overpowering the guards.”
  • In a movie about a prison escape, a character might say, “We need to come up with a plan to bust out of this place.”
  • A person discussing famous prison escapes might mention, “Alcatraz is known for its attempts to bust out.”

25. Get sprung

This phrase means to be released or set free from jail or prison.

  • For example, “After serving their sentence, the inmate finally got sprung.”
  • In a conversation about someone’s legal troubles, a person might say, “They got lucky and got sprung due to lack of evidence.”
  • A person discussing the justice system might say, “It’s important to ensure that only deserving individuals get sprung and not repeat offenders.”

26. Go on the lam

To go on the lam means to escape from custody or to go into hiding in order to avoid being captured by the authorities.

  • For example, “The fugitive went on the lam after breaking out of prison.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “He knew he had to go on the lam if he wanted to stay out of jail.”
  • A news article might report, “The suspect has been on the lam for over a week, eluding the police at every turn.”

27. Walk the line

To walk the line means to behave in a way that avoids getting into trouble or attracting attention from the authorities.

  • For instance, “After getting released from jail, he decided to walk the line and stay away from his old criminal activities.”
  • A parent might advise their child, “If you want to stay out of jail, you need to learn to walk the line and make good choices.”
  • In a movie about a reformed criminal, a character might say, “I’ve walked the line for years, trying to make up for my past mistakes.”

28. Slip away

To slip away means to escape from custody or a situation without being noticed or detected.

  • For example, “The suspect managed to slip away from the police during the chaos of the protest.”
  • In a spy thriller, a character might say, “I need to slip away from the enemy agents and meet my contact in secret.”
  • A news report might state, “The prisoner slipped away from the guards while they were distracted.”

29. Slide out

To slide out means to escape from custody or a situation quietly and without attracting attention.

  • For instance, “He managed to slide out of the handcuffs and sneak out of the police station.”
  • In a prison break movie, a character might say, “We need to find a way to slide out of this place without raising any alarms.”
  • A witness to a crime might testify, “I saw the suspect slide out of the back door and disappear into the night.”

30. Jump bail

To jump bail means to fail to appear in court as required after being released from custody on the condition of posting bail.

  • For example, “The defendant decided to jump bail and flee the country to avoid facing trial.”
  • In a legal drama, a lawyer might say, “If you jump bail, you’ll only make your situation worse and face additional charges.”
  • A news headline might read, “Famous celebrity jumps bail and goes into hiding to avoid jail time.”

31. Get a reprieve

“The defendant was able to get a reprieve from their jail sentence due to new evidence.” – In some cases, a judge may grant a reprieve to allow a person more time to prepare their case for trial. – A lawyer might advise their client, “We can try to get a reprieve while we gather more evidence.” – Someone might say, “I hope I can get a reprieve from my sentence and be released early.”

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32. Get out on parole

“After serving 10 years of his sentence, he was finally able to get out on parole.” – Parole boards often consider factors such as good behavior and rehabilitation progress when deciding whether to grant parole. – A person might say, “I’m hoping to get out on parole next year and start rebuilding my life.” – A news article might report, “The convicted criminal is set to get out on parole next month.”

33. Busted loose

“He finally busted loose from jail after months of planning.” – This phrase is often used to describe a daring or dramatic escape. – A witness might say, “I saw him bust loose from the prison yard and make a run for it.” – In a crime movie, a character might say, “We’re going to bust you loose from this place, no matter what it takes.”

34. Spring someone

“His friends worked together to spring him from jail.” – This phrase implies a well-coordinated effort to free someone from custody. – A person might say, “I need your help to spring my brother from prison.” – In a heist movie, a character might say, “We’re going to spring the boss’s son from jail and get him out of the country.”

35. Get off scot-free

“Despite the evidence against him, he somehow managed to get off scot-free.” – This phrase implies avoiding punishment or consequences entirely. – A person might say, “I can’t believe he got off scot-free after what he did.” – In a court case, a lawyer might argue, “My client should be allowed to get off scot-free due to lack of evidence.”

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36. Beat the rap

This phrase refers to successfully defending oneself against criminal charges or avoiding punishment for a crime.

  • For example, “The defense attorney was able to present enough evidence to help her client beat the rap.”
  • In a discussion about legal strategies, someone might say, “If you want to beat the rap, you need a strong defense.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was falsely accused, but luckily I beat the rap and proved my innocence.”

37. Do a runner

This slang phrase is commonly used to describe someone running away or escaping from a situation, usually to avoid facing the consequences or obligations.

  • For instance, “He did a runner after racking up a huge gambling debt.”
  • In a conversation about someone evading responsibility, one might say, “He always tries to do a runner whenever things get tough.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I did a runner from a bad relationship and never looked back.”

38. Slip through the cracks

This phrase refers to someone managing to escape or avoid detection or punishment, often due to a mistake or oversight.

  • For example, “The suspect slipped through the cracks and disappeared before the police arrived.”
  • In a discussion about loopholes or flaws in a system, someone might say, “There are always ways for people to slip through the cracks.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I managed to slip through the cracks and avoid getting caught for a minor offense.”

39. Get a get-out-of-jail-free card

This phrase is a metaphorical reference to the “Get Out of Jail Free” card in the board game Monopoly, indicating a means to escape punishment or consequences.

  • For instance, “He managed to get a get-out-of-jail-free card from a powerful friend.”
  • In a conversation about someone avoiding responsibility, one might say, “It seems like they always have a get-out-of-jail-free card.”
  • A person sharing a personal story might say, “I wish I had a get-out-of-jail-free card when I got caught skipping school.”

40. Make a getaway

This phrase refers to successfully escaping or fleeing from a situation, especially after committing a crime or wrongdoing.

  • For example, “The thief made a getaway before the police arrived.”
  • In a discussion about criminal activities, someone might say, “The key to a successful crime is making a clean getaway.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I panicked and made a getaway after accidentally breaking a store window.”

41. Pull a Houdini

This phrase refers to the act of escaping from jail or a difficult situation without anyone noticing or being able to explain how it happened.

  • For example, “He managed to pull a Houdini and disappear from his jail cell.”
  • In a conversation about a daring escape, someone might say, “I heard he pulled a Houdini and vanished from the prison.”
  • A news article might describe a successful escape as, “The inmate pulled a Houdini and left authorities baffled.”

42. Break free

This phrase is used to describe the act of freeing oneself from jail or any form of confinement.

  • For instance, “After years of planning, he finally broke free from prison.”
  • In a discussion about escape attempts, someone might say, “Breaking free from jail requires careful planning and timing.”
  • A news headline might read, “Inmate breaks free from maximum-security prison.”

43. Slip out

This phrase means to exit or leave a place, especially jail, without being noticed or detected.

  • For example, “He managed to slip out of his cell without the guards noticing.”
  • In a conversation about jailbreaks, someone might say, “Slipping out of jail requires cunning and stealth.”
  • A news report might state, “The prisoner slipped out of the facility, leaving authorities searching for answers.”

44. Walk away

This phrase refers to the act of leaving jail or a confinement situation without any resistance or hindrance.

  • For instance, “After serving his time, he walked away from the prison a free man.”
  • In a discussion about release from jail, someone might say, “Walking away from jail is a moment of freedom and relief.”
  • A news article might report, “Innocent man finally walks away from a wrongful conviction.”

45. Get out on bail

This phrase describes the act of being released from jail before the trial by paying a bail amount set by the court.

  • For example, “He was able to get out on bail and await his trial from outside the jail.”
  • In a conversation about legal procedures, someone might say, “Getting out on bail requires the assistance of a bail bondsman.”
  • A news report might state, “The celebrity was able to get out on bail after being arrested for a minor offense.”

46. Serve time

This phrase refers to the act of being incarcerated and serving a sentence in prison. It implies that a person has been convicted of a crime and is required to spend a specific period of time behind bars.

  • For example, a news article might state, “The convicted criminal will serve time in a maximum-security prison.”
  • In a conversation about legal consequences, someone might say, “If you commit a serious crime, you could end up serving time.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might admit, “I made some bad choices and had to serve time for my actions.”

47. Get parole

Parole is a legal arrangement where a prisoner is released from prison before completing their full sentence, but is still under the supervision of authorities. It allows individuals to serve the remainder of their sentence in the community, rather than behind bars.

  • For instance, a parole board might grant parole to a prisoner who has shown good behavior and rehabilitation.
  • In a discussion about criminal justice, someone might argue, “Parole can be an effective way to reintegrate offenders back into society.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I was able to get parole after serving half of my sentence.”

48. Get a pardon

A pardon is an official act of forgiveness by the government that removes the legal consequences of a crime. It is typically granted by a high-ranking official, such as a governor or the president, and allows the individual to be released from prison or have their criminal record expunged.

  • For example, a president might grant a pardon to someone who has shown remorse and rehabilitation.
  • In a conversation about fairness in the legal system, someone might argue, “A pardon can give someone a second chance at life.”
  • A person discussing criminal justice reform might say, “We need to make the process of getting a pardon more accessible and equitable.”

49. Get a second chance

This phrase is often used to describe the act of being given another opportunity or a fresh start after making mistakes or facing adversity. In the context of getting out of jail, it implies that a person has the chance to rebuild their life and make positive changes.

  • For instance, a person might say, “After serving my sentence, I’m grateful for the second chance I’ve been given.”
  • In a discussion about rehabilitation, someone might argue, “Everyone deserves a second chance to turn their life around.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might admit, “I made some bad choices, but I’m determined to make the most of my second chance.”

50. Get a break

In the context of getting out of jail, this phrase suggests that a person has encountered a stroke of luck or a fortunate event that helps them in their efforts to be released or have their sentence reduced.

  • For example, a lawyer might say, “We need to find a way to get our client a break in court.”
  • In a conversation about the criminal justice system, someone might argue, “Not everyone gets a fair chance to get a break and prove their innocence.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I was fortunate enough to get a break and have my sentence reduced.”

51. Get a getaway

This phrase refers to the act of successfully escaping from jail or prison. It implies that the person has managed to get away from the authorities and is now free.

  • For example, a news headline might read, “Inmate gets a getaway, still on the run.”
  • In a conversation about famous prison escapes, someone might say, “He really pulled off a daring getaway.”
  • A person discussing the challenges of escaping might comment, “It’s not easy to get a getaway without being caught.”