Top 38 Slang For Grandma – Meaning & Usage

Grandmas, the wise and loving matriarchs of our families, have their own unique way of speaking that can sometimes leave us scratching our heads. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered with a list of the top slang words for grandma. From “Nana” to “Mimi” and everything in between, we’ve gathered the most popular and endearing terms that grandchildren use to refer to their beloved grandmothers. So whether you’re a grandchild looking for a new nickname or just curious about the language of grandmas, this listicle is sure to bring a smile to your face.

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1. Glam-ma

This term is used to describe a grandma who is fashionable, trendy, and glamorous. It is a play on the words “glamorous” and “grandma”.

  • For example, someone might say, “My glam-ma always dresses in the latest fashion.”
  • A person might post a picture of their stylish grandma on social media with the caption, “Meet my glam-ma, the most fashionable grandma around.”
  • In a conversation about cool grandmas, someone might say, “I wish my grandma was a glam-ma like yours!”

2. Mimi

This term is often used as a cute and affectionate nickname for a grandma. It is a simple and easy-to-say name that is popular among grandchildren.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my Mimi.”
  • In a family gathering, someone might say, “Let’s ask Mimi to tell us a story.”
  • A person might post a picture of their grandma on social media with the caption, “Happy birthday to the best Mimi in the world!”

3. Nana

This term is a common nickname for a grandmother. It is a warm and affectionate name that reflects the love and care grandmothers provide.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit my Nana this weekend.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “Do you have any special memories with your Nana?”
  • A person might share a heartwarming story about their Nana, saying, “My Nana always has a smile on her face and gives the best hugs.”

4. Grammy

This term is often used to refer to a grandma who loves music or is musically talented. It is derived from the word “gramophone”, an old-fashioned record player.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “My Grammy plays the piano beautifully.”
  • In a discussion about family talents, someone might say, “My Grammy used to be a singer in her younger days.”
  • A person might share a video of their Grammy singing or playing a musical instrument with the caption, “Check out my talented Grammy in action!”

5. Meemaw

This term is commonly used in the southern United States to refer to a grandma. It is a regional variation of “grandma” and is often associated with warm hospitality and traditional values.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I spent the summer with my Meemaw in Alabama.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might mention, “My Meemaw always makes the best homemade biscuits.”
  • A person might post a picture of their Meemaw’s cozy home with the caption, “Nothing beats a visit to Meemaw’s house in the countryside!”

6. Aba Daba

Aba Daba is a term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is a playful and affectionate term.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit my Aba Daba this weekend.”
  • A person talking about their family might mention, “My Aba Daba is the sweetest woman I know.”
  • Another might say, “I have such fond memories of baking cookies with my Aba Daba when I was a child.”

7. Lovey

Lovey is a term of endearment used to refer to one’s grandmother. It conveys a sense of love and affection.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my Lovey.”
  • A person talking about their family might mention, “My Lovey is the heart of our family.”
  • Another might say, “I’m so grateful for the wisdom and love my Lovey has shared with me.”

8. Big Momma

Big Momma is a term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It often implies a sense of respect and admiration for the grandmother’s role in the family.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I can always count on Big Momma for wise advice.”
  • A person discussing their family might mention, “Big Momma has been the matriarch of our family for generations.”
  • Another might say, “I have such fond memories of family gatherings at Big Momma’s house.”

9. Mamaw

Mamaw is a term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is a variation of the term “mama” and conveys a sense of familiarity and closeness.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit Mamaw this weekend.”
  • A person talking about their family might mention, “Mamaw has always been there for me, no matter what.”
  • Another might say, “I have such cherished memories of Mamaw’s homemade pies.”

10. Memaw

Memaw is a term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is a variation of the term “mama” and conveys a sense of warmth and affection.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my Memaw.”
  • A person discussing their family might mention, “Memaw has a heart of gold and always puts family first.”
  • Another might say, “Memaw’s hugs are the best medicine for a bad day.”

11. Grand-mère

This term is a French word for grandmother. It is often used by people with French heritage or in bilingual families.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my grand-mère in Paris.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “Do you call your grandmother grand-mère?”
  • A person might introduce their grand-mère by saying, “This is my grand-mère, Marie.”

12. Glamma

This term is used to describe a stylish and glamorous grandmother. It emphasizes the grandmother’s fashionable and trendy qualities.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My glamma always dresses in the latest fashion.”
  • In a conversation about family, a person might ask, “Does your glamma have a signature style?”
  • A person might compliment their glamma by saying, “She’s the most glamorous grandmother I know.”

13. Gram

This term is a shortened version of the word “grandma.” It is often used as an affectionate or informal way to refer to one’s grandmother.

  • For example, a person might say, “I love spending time with my gram.”
  • In a discussion about family, someone might ask, “Do your kids call your mom gram?”
  • A person might introduce their gram by saying, “This is my gram, Susan.”

14. Kitty

This term is an affectionate nickname for a grandmother. It is often used by grandchildren to show love and affection.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I love my kitty so much.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “Does your kitty spoil you with treats?”
  • A person might introduce their kitty by saying, “This is my kitty, Margaret.”

15. Lola

This term is the Filipino word for grandmother. It is commonly used in Filipino families or by people with Filipino heritage.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to visit my lola in Manila.”
  • In a discussion about family traditions, someone might ask, “Do you celebrate holidays with your lola?”
  • A person might introduce their lola by saying, “This is my lola, Maria.”

16. Lolly

This slang term is often used to affectionately refer to one’s grandmother. It’s a cute and playful way to address her.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my Lolly.”
  • A person might introduce their grandmother by saying, “This is my Lolly, the best grandma in the world.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can we go to Lolly’s house today?”

17. Lovie

This slang term is a sweet and endearing way to refer to one’s grandmother. It highlights the close and loving relationship between grandparent and grandchild.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I miss my Lovie so much.”
  • A person might express their love for their grandmother by saying, “I have the best Lovie in the world.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can I call you Lovie instead of Grandma?”

18. MawMaw

This slang term is commonly used in the Southern United States to refer to one’s grandmother. It adds a touch of regional flavor and is often associated with warm, Southern hospitality.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit my MawMaw this weekend.”
  • A person might mention their grandmother by saying, “My MawMaw makes the best homemade pies.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can I spend the summer with MawMaw?”

19. Granny

This slang term is a casual and informal way to refer to one’s grandmother. It’s commonly used and widely recognized.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “I love going to Granny’s house.”
  • A person might introduce their grandmother by saying, “This is my Granny, the coolest grandma ever.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can I have a sleepover at Granny’s tonight?”

20. Grams

This slang term is a shortened version of “grandmother” and is often used as a nickname. It’s a simple and convenient way to refer to one’s grandma.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit Grams after school.”
  • A person might express their affection by saying, “I have the best Grams in the world.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can I call you Grams instead of Grandma?”

21. Grannykins

Grannykins is a cute and endearing term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is often used by children or grandchildren to show love and affection.

  • For example, a child might say, “I love spending time with Grannykins.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can we go visit Grannykins today?”
  • When introducing their grandmother, someone might say, “This is my Grannykins, the best grandma in the world!”

22. G-Ma

G-Ma is a casual and abbreviated term for grandma. It is often used in a more informal or relaxed setting, and can be used by both grandchildren and adults.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “Hey G-Ma, can I have some cookies?”
  • An adult might refer to their grandmother as “G-Ma” when talking to friends or other family members.
  • When signing a card or letter, someone might write, “Love, G-Ma.”

23. Gamma

Gamma is another term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is a less common slang term, but can still be used to show affection or familiarity.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit Gamma this weekend.”
  • When talking about family, someone might say, “My Gamma is the sweetest person I know.”
  • When introducing their grandmother, a person might say, “This is my Gamma, she’s the best!”

24. Bubby

Bubby is a Yiddish term that is often used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is a term that has been adopted into English slang and is sometimes used by individuals with Jewish heritage or in communities where Yiddish is spoken.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “Bubby, can you tell me a story?”
  • When talking about family traditions, someone might say, “My Bubby used to make the best matzo ball soup.”
  • When introducing their grandmother, a person might say, “This is my Bubby, she’s the matriarch of our family.”

25. Grandma

Grandma is the standard and most commonly used term for one’s grandmother. While not slang, it is still worth including as it is a familiar and widely recognized term.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with Grandma.”
  • When talking about family, someone might say, “My Grandma is the best.”
  • When introducing their grandmother, a person might say, “This is my Grandma, she means the world to me.”

26. Omi

Omi is a German term used to refer to a grandmother. It is a diminutive form of “Oma,” which is the standard word for grandmother in German.

  • For example, a person with German heritage might say, “I’m going to visit my Omi this weekend.”
  • A child might ask, “Can Omi read me a bedtime story?”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “My Omi is the sweetest person I know.”

27. Yaya

Yaya is a Greek term used to refer to a grandmother. It is a term of endearment and is commonly used by Greek-speaking individuals.

  • For instance, a person with Greek heritage might introduce their grandmother as “Yaya.”
  • A child might say, “I love going to Yaya’s house for Greek food.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might mention, “My Yaya taught me how to make traditional Greek desserts.”

28. Savta

Savta is a Hebrew term used to refer to a grandmother. It is a term of endearment and is commonly used by Hebrew-speaking individuals.

  • For example, a person with Israeli heritage might say, “I’m going to visit my Savta this weekend.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can Savta teach me how to cook her famous recipe?”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might say, “My Savta always gives the best advice.”

29. Tutu

Tutu is a Hawaiian term used to refer to a grandmother. It is a term of respect and is commonly used by Hawaiian-speaking individuals.

  • For instance, a person with Hawaiian heritage might introduce their grandmother as “Tutu.”
  • A grandchild might say, “Tutu tells the best stories about our family history.”
  • In a conversation about cultural traditions, someone might mention, “My Tutu taught me how to dance the hula.”

30. Nai Nai

Nai Nai is a Mandarin term used to refer to a grandmother. It is a term of endearment and is commonly used by Mandarin-speaking individuals.

  • For example, a person with Chinese heritage might say, “I’m going to visit my Nai Nai this weekend.”
  • A grandchild might ask, “Can Nai Nai teach me how to write Chinese characters?”
  • In a conversation about family values, someone might say, “Respecting our elders, like Nai Nai, is important in Chinese culture.”

31. Babcia

Babcia is the Polish word for grandmother. It is a term of endearment used by Polish-speaking grandchildren to refer to their grandmother.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my babcia.”
  • When introducing their grandmother, someone might say, “This is my babcia, she makes the best pierogis.”
  • A person might ask, “Do you have any special traditions with your babcia?”

32. Ouma

Ouma is the Afrikaans word for grandmother. It is commonly used in South Africa and Namibia to refer to one’s grandmother.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “My ouma always tells the best stories.”
  • When talking about family, someone might mention, “My ouma lives on a farm in the countryside.”
  • A person might ask, “What does your ouma like to do in her free time?”

33. Mormor

Mormor is the Swedish word for grandmother. It is often used by Swedish-speaking grandchildren to address or refer to their grandmother.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I’m going to visit my mormor this weekend.”
  • When talking about family traditions, someone might mention, “Every Christmas, we celebrate with my mormor.”
  • A person might ask, “Does your mormor live nearby?”

34. Nenek

Nenek is the Indonesian word for grandmother. It is a term used by Indonesian-speaking grandchildren to address or refer to their grandmother.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “My nenek always cooks delicious meals.”
  • When talking about family, someone might mention, “My nenek has a beautiful garden.”
  • A person might ask, “What is your nenek’s favorite hobby?”

35. Busia

Busia is another Polish word for grandmother. It is a term of endearment used by Polish-speaking grandchildren to refer to their grandmother.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my busia.”
  • When introducing their grandmother, someone might say, “This is my busia, she loves to knit.”
  • A person might ask, “What is your busia’s favorite Polish dish?”

36. Bomma

This term is derived from the Dutch word “oma” and is commonly used in South Africa to refer to a grandmother. It is an affectionate and informal way to address one’s grandmother.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love spending time with my bomma.”
  • In a conversation about family, someone might ask, “Do you have a close relationship with your bomma?”
  • A person sharing childhood memories might say, “My bomma used to bake the most delicious cookies.”

37. Gammy

This is a casual term used to refer to one’s grandmother. It is often used by children or grandchildren to address their grandmother in an affectionate manner.

  • For instance, a grandchild might say, “Can I go to the park with you, gammy?”
  • In a family gathering, someone might ask, “Where’s gammy? I haven’t seen her in a while.”
  • A person reminiscing about their childhood might say, “I have such fond memories of spending summers at gammy’s house.”

38. Babushka

This term is derived from the Russian word for grandmother and is commonly used in Eastern European cultures. It is a warm and endearing way to refer to one’s grandmother.

  • For example, a grandchild might say, “I love visiting my babushka in the countryside.”
  • In a conversation about family traditions, someone might mention, “My babushka always made the best homemade pierogies.”
  • A person sharing a childhood story might say, “I remember sitting by the fireplace with my babushka, listening to her stories.”
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