Top 91 Slang For Drop Me A Mail Crossword – Meaning & Usage

Crossword puzzles can be a fun and challenging way to test your knowledge of various topics, and slang for “drop me a mail” is no exception. Whether you’re a crossword enthusiast or simply looking to expand your vocabulary, this listicle is sure to pique your interest. We’ve scoured the depths of the English language to bring you a collection of slang words and phrases that are commonly used to express the idea of “drop me a mail.” So, grab a pen and get ready to fill in the blanks with these trendy and oh-so-cool slangs!

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1. EMM

This abbreviation stands for “Email me” and is used to request that someone send an email instead of contacting through other means. It is commonly used in online communication.

  • For example, a person might say, “If you have any questions, EMM me and I’ll get back to you.”
  • In a business context, someone might write, “EMM me the details of the meeting.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you EMM me the recipe for that delicious dish?”

2. DM

This term refers to a private message sent through a social media platform or messaging app. It allows users to have one-on-one conversations without it being visible to others.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Slide into my DMs if you want to chat.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you DM me your address so I can send you a gift?”
  • In a discussion about online dating, someone might mention, “I met my partner through a DM on Instagram.”

3. PM

Similar to a DM, a PM is a private message sent through a messaging platform or forum. It allows users to have private conversations that are not visible to others.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll send you a PM with the details.”
  • In an online community, someone might ask, “Can I PM you for more information about your post?”
  • A user might send a PM to a moderator to report a violation of the community guidelines.

4. IM

This term refers to a real-time, text-based conversation conducted through a messaging app or platform. It allows users to have quick and immediate communication with each other.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Let’s IM instead of emailing back and forth.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can we IM about the project details?”
  • A person might mention, “I prefer IM for quick questions or updates.”

5. INB

This abbreviation stands for “Inbox” and is used to refer to the incoming messages or emails in someone’s account. It is commonly used in online communication.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have a lot of messages in my INB that I need to respond to.”
  • In a discussion about email organization, someone might mention, “I like to keep my INB clean and organized.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Did you see the email I sent you? It’s in your INB.”

6. OOF

This term is used to indicate that a person is not available or not working at the moment. It is often used as an auto-reply in emails or as a status message in messaging apps.

  • For example, “I will be OOF for the rest of the day, but I’ll get back to you tomorrow.”
  • A person might set their email auto-reply to say, “I’m currently OOF and will have limited access to email.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I won’t be able to join the meeting today, I’ll be OOF.”

7. FYI

This abbreviation is used to provide information or to share something that the recipient may find useful or interesting.

  • For instance, “FYI, the deadline for the project has been extended by one week.”
  • A person might send an email with the subject line “FYI: Important Updates” to inform their team about recent developments.
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “FYI, there’s a new policy in place starting next month.”

8. BTW

This abbreviation is used to introduce additional information or to mention something that is not directly related to the current topic.

  • For example, “BTW, have you tried the new restaurant downtown?”
  • A person might send a message saying, “BTW, I found some interesting articles related to our discussion.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “BTW, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”

9. TTYL

This phrase is used to indicate that the person will end the conversation or communication for now, but will speak or message again in the future.

  • For instance, “I need to go now, TTYL!”
  • A person might end a phone call with a friend by saying, “I’ll catch up with you later, TTYL.”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I’m going into a meeting, TTYL.”

10. BRB

This abbreviation is used to indicate a temporary absence from a conversation or activity, with the intention of returning shortly.

  • For example, “I need to grab a drink, BRB!”
  • A person might use this term in a chat room to inform others that they will be away for a moment.
  • In a video call, someone might say, “BRB, I just need to answer the door.”

11. ASAP

This acronym is used to indicate that something needs to be done or delivered quickly. It is often used in emails or messages to emphasize urgency.

  • For example, a boss might write to an employee, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • A friend might text, “Can you pick up some milk on your way home? ASAP!”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might say, “We need to finish this project ASAP to meet the deadline.”

12. LOL

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something is funny. It is commonly used in text messages, social media posts, and online conversations.

  • For instance, a friend might comment on a funny video, “LOL, that made me laugh so hard!”
  • In a group chat, someone might respond to a joke with, “LOL, you always know how to make us laugh.”
  • A person might write, “I can’t stop LOLing at this hilarious meme.”

13. ROFL

This acronym is used to indicate extreme amusement. It is often used in response to something that is very funny or entertaining.

  • For example, someone might comment on a hilarious video, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • In a chat conversation, a friend might respond to a funny story with, “ROFL, that’s the funniest thing I’ve heard.”
  • A person might write, “This comedian always has me ROFLing with their jokes.”

14. OMG

This expression is used to express surprise, shock, or excitement. It is commonly used in text messages, social media posts, and online conversations.

  • For instance, someone might comment on a surprising news article, “OMG, I can’t believe this happened!”
  • In a chat conversation, a friend might respond to a shocking revelation with, “OMG, are you serious?”
  • A person might write, “OMG, I just won a contest! I’m so excited!”

15. TIA

This acronym is used to express gratitude in anticipation of a favor or assistance. It is commonly used in emails or messages when requesting help or information.

  • For example, someone might write, “Could you please send me the document? TIA!”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you cover my shift tomorrow? TIA.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “I’m looking for recommendations for a good restaurant in the area. TIA!”

16. NP

This is a common abbreviation used to indicate that something is not a problem or that someone is not bothered by a request or situation.

  • For instance, if someone asks for a favor and you’re happy to help, you might respond with “NP!”
  • In a conversation where someone apologizes for a mistake, you could reply with “NP, everyone makes mistakes.”
  • If someone thanks you for something, you might respond with “NP, glad I could help!”

17. THX

A shortened form of the word “thanks,” often used in informal written communication to express gratitude.

  • For example, if someone does you a favor, you might respond with a quick “THX!”
  • In a text message conversation, you could say “THX for the invite!”
  • If someone compliments you, you might reply with “THX, I appreciate it!”

18. TY

A common abbreviation for the phrase “thank you,” often used in informal written communication to express gratitude.

  • For instance, if someone gives you a gift, you might send them a quick “TY!”
  • In a comment section on social media, you could say “TY for the kind words!”
  • If someone helps you out, you might say “TY, I really appreciate your assistance!”

19. LMK

This abbreviation is used to request that someone provides information or updates on a specific matter.

  • For example, if you’re making plans with a friend and need to confirm a time, you might say “LMK when you’re available.”
  • In a work setting, you could ask a colleague to “LMK if there are any updates on the project.”
  • If someone offers to help you with something, you might reply with “LMK if you need any assistance!”

20. GTG

This abbreviation is used to indicate that someone needs to leave or end a conversation or activity.

  • For instance, if you’re in a chat and need to leave, you might say “GTG, talk to you later!”
  • In a text message conversation, you could say “I’m running late, GTG soon.”
  • If someone asks if you’re available to hang out, you might respond with “Sorry, GTG, maybe next time!”

21. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a close friend or group of friends who are considered to be like family. It signifies a strong and lasting friendship.

  • For example, “She’s my BFF. We’ve been friends since kindergarten.”
  • When sharing a photo with a friend, one might caption it, “Out with my BFF for a fun night out.”
  • In a conversation about friendship, someone might say, “I’m grateful to have a BFF who always has my back.”

22. IDK

This acronym is used to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge about something. It is commonly used in casual conversations or text messages.

  • For instance, when asked a question, one might respond, “IDK, I’ll have to look it up.”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “IDK where we should go for dinner, any suggestions?”
  • When discussing a difficult problem, a person might admit, “IDK how to solve this issue, we need more information.”

23. NVM

This acronym is used to indicate that something previously mentioned or asked about should be disregarded or ignored. It is often used to retract a statement or dismiss a topic.

  • For example, if someone asks for directions and realizes they made a mistake, they might say, “NVM, I figured it out.”
  • In a text conversation, someone might respond with “NVM” to indicate that they no longer need the information they previously asked for.
  • If someone brings up an embarrassing moment from the past, a person might say, “NVM, let’s not talk about that.”

24. WBU

This acronym is used to ask someone about their opinion or experience after sharing one’s own. It is commonly used in online discussions or text conversations.

  • For instance, if someone says, “I love going to the beach. WBU?” they are asking the other person if they also enjoy going to the beach.
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I had a great weekend. Went hiking and tried a new restaurant. WBU?”
  • When discussing preferences, a person might ask, “I prefer cats over dogs. WBU?”

25. HBU

This acronym is similar to “WBU” and is used to ask someone about their opinion or experience after sharing one’s own. It is commonly used in online discussions or text conversations.

  • For example, if someone says, “I had a great time at the concert. HBU?” they are asking the other person about their experience at the concert.
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “I just finished watching a new movie. It was amazing. HBU?”.
  • When discussing favorite hobbies, a person might ask, “I enjoy painting. HBU?”.

26. WYD

This is an abbreviation for “What You Doing” and is often used in casual conversations to ask someone what they are currently doing or their plans.

  • For example, a friend might text, “Hey, wyd tonight?”
  • Another might reply, “Just watching Netflix, wyd?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “wyd this weekend?” to make plans with the others.
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27. HMU

This phrase is short for “Hit Me Up” and is used to tell someone to contact or reach out to you. It is often used to invite others to get in touch or to express interest in meeting up.

  • For instance, someone might post on social media, “In town for the weekend, hmu if you want to hang out!”
  • A friend might text, “I’m bored, hmu if you want to grab coffee.”
  • In a dating app conversation, one person might say, “I love hiking, hmu if you want to go on a hike together.”

28. AFK

This acronym stands for “Away From Keyboard” and is often used in online gaming or chatrooms to indicate that someone is temporarily unavailable or not actively participating.

  • For example, a player might say, “brb, afk for a few minutes.”
  • In a work chat, someone might announce, “I’ll be afk for lunch, back in 30 minutes.”
  • A person might use this acronym to explain their absence in a group chat, saying, “Sorry for the late reply, I was afk.”

29. IRL

This abbreviation stands for “In Real Life” and is used to differentiate between online or virtual interactions and interactions that occur in person.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I met my online friend irl for the first time yesterday.”
  • In a discussion about social media, someone might comment, “People often present an idealized version of themselves online, but it’s important to remember that it’s not always reflective of what they’re like irl.”
  • A person might use this abbreviation to clarify their intentions, saying, “I’m just looking for friends to hang out with irl, not online.”

30. FOMO

This acronym stands for “Fear Of Missing Out” and is used to describe the feeling of anxiety or unease that arises from the belief that others are experiencing more enjoyable or fulfilling experiences.

  • For example, someone might say, “I didn’t go to the party last night and now I have major fomo.”
  • In a conversation about social events, a person might comment, “I sometimes struggle with fomo and feel like I have to say yes to every invitation.”
  • A friend might text, “You should come to the concert with us, don’t want you to have fomo!”

31. YOLO

YOLO is an acronym that stands for “You Only Live Once.” It is often used to justify taking risks or doing something adventurous.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going skydiving tomorrow, YOLO!”
  • Another person might post a photo on social media with the caption, “Trying a new extreme sport today because YOLO!”
  • In a conversation about trying new experiences, someone might say, “Life is short, YOLO!”

32. FTFY

FTFY is an acronym that stands for “Fixed That For You.” It is used to suggest a correction or improvement to someone else’s statement or comment.

  • For instance, if someone writes, “I’m going to the move tonight,” another person might reply, “FTFY: I’m going to the movie tonight.”
  • In a discussion about a typo in a post, someone might comment, “FTFY: You misspelled ‘their’ as ‘there’.”
  • Another person might say, “Your argument is flawed, FTFY: Your argument is well-reasoned and supported.”

33. IANAL

IANAL is an acronym that stands for “I Am Not A Lawyer.” It is often used to preface a statement or opinion to clarify that the person speaking is not a legal professional.

  • For example, someone might say, “IANAL, but I think you have a strong case.”
  • In a discussion about legal advice, someone might comment, “IANAL, but it sounds like you might need to consult with an attorney.”
  • Another person might preface their opinion with, “IANAL, but I believe the law should be changed.”

34. TL;DR

TL;DR is an acronym that stands for “Too Long; Didn’t Read.” It is often used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or provide a brief summary of an article or post.

  • For instance, someone might write, “TL;DR: The article discusses the impact of climate change on polar bears.”
  • In a comment section with a long discussion, someone might say, “TL;DR: Can someone summarize the main points?”
  • Another person might use TL;DR to provide a condensed version of a news article in a social media post.

35. NSFW

NSFW is an acronym that stands for “Not Safe For Work.” It is used to indicate that the content being shared is inappropriate or explicit and should not be viewed in a professional or public setting.

  • For example, someone might share a link and warn, “NSFW: This video contains graphic content.”
  • In a discussion about office etiquette, someone might remind their colleagues, “Remember to label NSFW content if you’re sharing it.”
  • Another person might comment on a post, “NSFW warning would have been appreciated before opening that image.”

36. TBH

This acronym is used to preface an honest or straightforward statement. It is often used to express sincerity or to provide an honest opinion.

  • For example, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy the movie.”
  • A user might comment, “TBH, I think your outfit looks great!”
  • Someone might say, “TBH, I’m not sure if I can make it to the party.”

37. JK

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the previous statement was not meant to be taken seriously. It is often used in a playful or sarcastic manner.

  • For instance, “I can’t believe you fell for that prank! JK!”
  • A person might say, “JK, I actually love your new haircut.”
  • Someone might comment, “That movie was terrible… JK, it was amazing!”

38. BBL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be away for a short period of time and will return later.

  • For example, “I need to run some errands, BBL!”
  • A user might comment, “I’m going to grab some lunch, BBL.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a meeting now, BBL to finish our conversation.”

39. AFAIK

This abbreviation is used to indicate that the information being provided is based on the person’s current knowledge and may not be definitive.

  • For instance, “AFAIK, the party starts at 8 PM.”
  • A user might comment, “AFAIK, the store is closed on Sundays.”
  • Someone might say, “AFAIK, the project is still in progress.”

40. IMO

This acronym is used to preface a statement or viewpoint that represents the person’s personal opinion.

  • For example, “IMO, the new restaurant in town has the best pizza.”
  • A user might comment, “IMO, this book is a must-read.”
  • Someone might say, “IMO, the team should focus on improving their defense.”

41. TMI

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or intimate details than the listener or reader wanted or needed to know.

  • For example, “I don’t need to know about your digestive issues. TMI!”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “TMI, dude. Keep that to yourself.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s relationship, someone might say, “She told me all the details of their argument. TMI, right?”

42. SMH

This acronym is used to express disappointment, disbelief, or frustration in response to something someone said or did.

  • For instance, “She said she forgot to turn in the assignment. SMH.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s poor decision, a person might comment, “SMH, some people never learn.”
  • A user might reply to a misleading statement on social media with, “SMH, do your research before spreading false information.”

43. RN

This acronym is used to indicate that something is happening or being done at the present moment.

  • For example, “I’m busy RN, can we talk later?”
  • In a text exchange about meeting up, someone might say, “I’m on my way, be there in 10 mins RN.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “I’m craving pizza RN, anyone else?”

44. ICYMI

This acronym is used to share information or content that the person believes others may have missed or overlooked.

  • For instance, “ICYMI, there’s a new episode of our favorite show tonight.”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the latest research shows that coffee has health benefits.”
  • In a discussion about recent news, someone might say, “ICYMI, there was a major accident on the highway this morning.”

45. TBT

This acronym is used to share or post something from the past, typically on a Thursday, as part of a social media trend.

  • For example, “TBT to that amazing vacation last summer.”
  • A user might post a photo from their childhood with the caption, “TBT to when life was simpler.”
  • In a conversation about fashion trends, someone might say, “TBT to the 90s when everyone wore flannel shirts.”

46. OOTD

This refers to a popular social media trend where users share pictures or descriptions of their daily outfit. It is often used in fashion-related discussions or when someone wants to show off their style.

  • For example, “Check out my OOTD! I’m loving this new dress and sneakers.”
  • A fashion influencer might post, “I’m sharing my OOTD on Instagram today. Don’t miss it!”
  • Someone might ask, “Any suggestions for an OOTD for a casual brunch?”

47. NBD

This acronym is used to indicate that something is not significant or important. It is often used to downplay a situation or to show nonchalance.

  • For instance, if someone apologizes for a minor inconvenience, you might respond, “NBD, it happens.”
  • A person might say, “I just scored front-row tickets to the concert. NBD.”
  • In a conversation about a small mistake, someone might comment, “NBD, we all make errors sometimes.”

48. TFW

This is a phrase used to express a relatable emotion or experience. It is often followed by a statement or image that captures the feeling being described.

  • For example, “TFW you finally finish a long day of work and can relax.”
  • A person might post, “TFW you see your favorite band live for the first time.”
  • In a discussion about a funny situation, someone might comment, “TFW you accidentally send a text to the wrong person.”

49. IIRC

This acronym is used to indicate that the following statement is based on the person’s memory and may not be completely accurate. It is often used when someone is unsure but wants to contribute to a conversation.

  • For instance, “IIRC, the restaurant we went to last night had amazing pasta.”
  • A person might say, “IIRC, the movie was released in the early 2000s.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might comment, “IIRC, the war ended in 1945.”

50. AF

This phrase is used to emphasize the intensity or extremeness of something. It is often used to describe a quality or characteristic that is very pronounced.

  • For example, “She is smart AF. She always gets the highest grades.”
  • A person might say, “That movie was scary AF. I couldn’t sleep after watching it.”
  • In a conversation about a delicious meal, someone might comment, “The pizza was cheesy AF. I loved it!”

51. Inbox me

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a message or contact them through their inbox on a social media platform or messaging app.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to inbox me.”
  • A person might post, “Looking for a roommate. Inbox me if interested.”
  • Someone might say, “I got a job offer! Inbox me for details.”

52. Hit me up

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to get in touch with them or contact them.

  • For instance, “If you need any help, hit me up.”
  • A person might post, “I’m bored. Hit me up if you want to hang out.”
  • Someone might say, “I heard you’re good with computers. Can you hit me up with some tech advice?”

53. Slide into my DMs

This phrase is used to invite someone to send a private message to them, usually on social media platforms.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to slide into my DMs.”
  • A person might post, “I’m single and ready to mingle. Slide into my DMs if you’re interested.”
  • Someone might say, “I saw your artwork on Instagram. Can you slide into my DMs? I have a business proposal for you.”

54. Shoot me an email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send them an email.

  • For instance, “If you have any further questions, please shoot me an email.”
  • A person might post, “I’m interested in collaborating. Shoot me an email with your ideas.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t discuss this over the phone. Shoot me an email so we can communicate in writing.”

55. Drop me a line

This phrase is used to ask someone to send them a message or get in touch with them.

  • For example, “If you have any updates, drop me a line.”
  • A person might post, “I’m traveling to a new city. Drop me a line if you have any recommendations.”
  • Someone might say, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Drop me a line and let me know how you’re doing.”

56. Holla at me

This phrase is used to ask someone to get in touch with you or reach out to you. It is a casual way of expressing the desire for communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, holla at me.”
  • Someone might say, “Holla at me if you want to hang out this weekend.”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “I miss you! Holla at me when you have time.”

57. Give me a shout

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, either through a phone call or any other means of communication. It implies the desire for a quick conversation or exchange of information.

  • For instance, “If you need any help, give me a shout.”
  • A person might say, “Give me a shout if you find the information I shared useful.”
  • When making plans, someone might say, “Give me a shout later and we can finalize the details.”

58. Ping me

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a message or get in touch with you. It is commonly used in digital communication and implies a quick and informal exchange.

  • For example, “If you have any updates, ping me.”
  • A person might say, “Ping me when you’re ready to discuss the project.”
  • When asking for feedback, someone might say, “Feel free to ping me with any suggestions or thoughts.”

59. Reach out

This phrase is used to encourage someone to contact you or initiate communication. It is a friendly way of expressing the desire for connection or interaction.

  • For instance, “If you ever need help, feel free to reach out.”
  • A person might say, “I wanted to reach out and see how you’re doing.”
  • When offering support, someone might say, “Don’t hesitate to reach out if you need someone to talk to.”

60. Let’s connect

This phrase is used to suggest the idea of connecting or establishing communication with someone. It implies the desire for further interaction or building a relationship.

  • For example, “We should grab coffee sometime and connect.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s connect on LinkedIn and stay in touch.”
  • When meeting someone at an event, someone might say, “It was great talking to you. Let’s connect and continue the conversation.”

61. Get in touch

This phrase is a casual way of asking someone to contact or communicate with you. It can refer to any form of communication, including email, phone call, or in-person meeting.

  • For example, a business owner might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch with me.”
  • A person looking for a job might ask, “Can you please provide your contact information so I can get in touch with you?”
  • Someone organizing an event might say, “If you’re interested in attending, get in touch with me for more details.”

62. Write me

This phrase is a more informal way of asking someone to send you a message or communicate with you. It can be used in various contexts, such as email, text message, or even a handwritten letter.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Write me an email and let me know how you’re doing.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Can you write me a quick message with the details of that meeting?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “If you have any questions, feel free to write me an email.”

63. Email me

This phrase is a straightforward way of asking someone to send you an email. It is commonly used in professional or formal settings, but can also be used in casual conversations.

  • For example, a business professional might say, “If you have any further questions, please email me.”
  • A customer might ask, “Can you email me the receipt for my purchase?”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “If you need to submit your assignment, please email me the file.”

64. Text me

This phrase is a casual way of asking someone to send you a text message. It is commonly used in informal or personal conversations, especially when referring to quick and immediate communication.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “If you need anything, just text me.”
  • A family member might ask, “Can you text me the address of the restaurant?”
  • A colleague might say, “If there are any updates, please text me so I can stay informed.”

65. Message me

This phrase is a general way of asking someone to send you a message. It can refer to any form of communication, including email, text message, or even a direct message on a social media platform.

  • For example, a social media user might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to message me.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you message me the details of our plans for tonight?”
  • A colleague might say, “If you need to discuss something, please message me so we can coordinate.”

66. Hit me with an email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you an email. It implies that you are open to receiving communication via email.

  • For example, you might say, “If you have any questions, hit me with an email.”
  • In a professional context, you could write, “Feel free to hit me with an email if you need any further information.”
  • A friend might say, “I have some exciting news to share, so hit me with an email when you have a chance.”

67. Drop me a note

This expression is used to ask someone to send you a message. It suggests that you are interested in receiving communication from them.

  • For instance, you might say, “If you have any updates, please drop me a note.”
  • In a business context, you could write, “Feel free to drop me a note if you have any questions or concerns.”
  • A colleague might say, “I’ll be out of the office tomorrow, so drop me a note if you need anything.”

68. Shoot me a message

This phrase is used to ask someone to send you a message. It implies that you are open to receiving communication and encourages the other person to reach out.

  • For example, you might say, “If you have any ideas, shoot me a message.”
  • In a casual conversation, you could write, “Feel free to shoot me a message if you want to grab lunch.”
  • A friend might say, “I have some exciting news to share, so shoot me a message when you have a chance.”

69. Give me a holler

This expression is used to ask someone to contact you. It suggests that you are available and eager to receive communication from them.

  • For instance, you might say, “If you need any assistance, give me a holler.”
  • In a professional context, you could write, “Feel free to give me a holler if you have any questions or need further clarification.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll be in town next week, so give me a holler if you want to meet up.”

70. Holla back

This phrase is used to ask someone to respond to you. It implies that you are expecting a reply and encourages the other person to get back to you.

  • For example, you might say, “Let me know if you’re available for a call. Holla back.”
  • In a casual conversation, you could write, “I sent you a funny meme. Holla back with your thoughts.”
  • A friend might say, “I need your opinion on something. Holla back when you have a chance.”

71. Send me a line

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a message or email. It is a casual way of requesting communication.

  • For example, “Hey, if you have any questions, just send me a line.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always available, so feel free to send me a line.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might ask, “Can you send me a line with the details of the meeting?”

72. Let’s chat

This phrase is used to suggest having a conversation with someone. It is a friendly and informal way of initiating communication.

  • For instance, “We should catch up sometime. Let’s chat.”
  • A person might say, “I have some ideas to discuss. Let’s chat about them.”
  • In a social setting, someone might suggest, “Let’s chat over a cup of coffee.”

73. Get at me

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact or reach out to the speaker. It is a casual way of requesting communication.

  • For example, “If you need any help, just get at me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always here to support you, so feel free to get at me.”
  • In a professional context, a colleague might ask, “Can you get at me with the latest updates?”

74. Holler at me

This phrase is used to ask someone to call or message the speaker. It is a colloquial way of requesting communication.

  • For instance, “If you want to hang out, just holler at me.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always up for a chat, so feel free to holler at me.”
  • In a social setting, someone might suggest, “If you need a ride, holler at me.”

75. Send me a shout

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact the speaker. It is a casual and friendly way of requesting communication.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, just send me a shout.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always here to help, so feel free to send me a shout.”
  • In a work context, a colleague might ask, “Can you send me a shout when you’re available?”

76. Hit me with a message

This phrase is used to request someone to send a message or communicate with them.

  • For example, “Hey, if you have any questions, hit me with a message.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say, “Hit me with a message if you need anything.”
  • A friend might text, “I heard you got a new job! Hit me with a message and let’s catch up.”

77. Reach me

This slang phrase means to contact or communicate with someone.

  • For instance, “If you need anything, feel free to reach me.”
  • A colleague might say, “Reach me if you have any updates on the project.”
  • A friend might text, “I’ll be at the coffee shop. Reach me when you’re on your way.”

78. Drop me a text

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to send a text message.

  • For example, “If you have any updates, drop me a text.”
  • A friend might say, “Drop me a text when you’re ready to meet up.”
  • Someone might text, “I’ll be running late. Can you drop me a text when you’re on your way?”

79. Ping me a message

This phrase is used to request someone to send a message or get in touch with them.

  • For instance, “If you have any questions, ping me a message.”
  • A colleague might say, “Ping me a message if you need any assistance.”
  • A friend might text, “I’ll be at the party. Ping me a message when you arrive.”

80. Shoot me a text

This slang phrase means to send a text message to someone.

  • For example, “Shoot me a text if you have any updates.”
  • A friend might say, “Shoot me a text when you’re ready to leave.”
  • Someone might text, “I’ll be late. Can you shoot me a text when you’re on your way?”

81. Give me a buzz

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to contact you, typically through a phone call. It implies a desire for communication or conversation.

  • For example, if you want a friend to call you, you might say, “Hey, give me a buzz later.”
  • In a professional context, someone might say, “If you have any questions, feel free to give me a buzz.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “If you need anything while you’re out, just give me a buzz and let me know.”

82. Holla at your girl

This slang phrase is used to ask someone to reach out or get in touch with you, often in a casual or friendly manner. It can be used to request a conversation or connection.

  • For instance, if you want someone to contact you, you might say, “Holla at your girl when you get a chance.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “If you’re ever in town, holla at your girl and we’ll hang out.”
  • A friend might ask, “Hey, can you holla at your girl and let her know about the party?”

83. Get in touch with me

This phrase is used to ask someone to contact or communicate with you. It can be used in various contexts, such as personal or professional settings.

  • For example, if you want someone to contact you, you might say, “Please get in touch with me as soon as possible.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to get in touch with me.”
  • A family member might say, “I miss you. Get in touch with me when you have time.”

84. Write to me

This phrase is used to ask someone to communicate with you through written correspondence, such as email or letters. It implies a desire for written communication.

  • For instance, if you want someone to email you, you might say, “Please write to me with your thoughts.”
  • In a professional context, someone might say, “If you have any updates, please write to me and let me know.”
  • A pen pal might ask, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Can you write to me and catch me up on your life?”

85. Email me back

This phrase is used to ask someone to reply to an email you have sent. It indicates a desire for a response or acknowledgement.

  • For example, if you want someone to reply to your email, you might say, “Please email me back with your availability.”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “I need your input on this project. Can you email me back with your thoughts?”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you receive my email? Can you please email me back and let me know?”

86. Text me back

This phrase is used to request a response to a text message that was sent. It implies that the sender is waiting for a reply.

  • For example, “Hey, can you text me back when you get a chance?”
  • A person might say, “I texted him earlier, but he hasn’t texted me back yet.”
  • Someone might send a follow-up message saying, “Just wanted to remind you to text me back if you haven’t already.”

87. Message me back

This phrase is similar to “text me back” but can be used for any type of messaging platform, such as social media or instant messaging apps.

  • For instance, “I messaged her on Facebook, but she hasn’t messaged me back.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you message him back yet?”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “Hey, can you message me back when you have a chance?”

88. Hit me up with an email

This phrase is used to ask someone to send an email. It implies that the sender is interested in receiving information or communication via email.

  • For example, “If you have any questions, feel free to hit me up with an email.”
  • A person might say, “I need you to hit me up with an email so I can send you the details.”
  • Someone might request, “Can you hit me up with an email when you have a moment?”

89. Drop me a line or two

This phrase is used to ask someone to send a brief message or email. It implies that the sender is looking for a quick and concise communication.

  • For instance, “I haven’t heard from you in a while. Can you drop me a line or two?”
  • A person might say, “Just wanted to check in. Drop me a line or two when you get a chance.”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “Hey, can you drop me a line or two to let me know you received this?”

90. Shoot me a quick message

This phrase is similar to “drop me a line or two” but specifically refers to a quick message. It implies that the sender is looking for a fast and efficient communication.

  • For example, “I need your input on this. Can you shoot me a quick message?”
  • A person might ask, “Can you shoot me a quick message to let me know if you’re available tomorrow?”
  • Someone might send a message saying, “Shoot me a quick message when you have a moment.”

91. Give me a shout-out

When you give someone a shout-out, you are publicly acknowledging or mentioning them, usually to show appreciation or give them recognition.

  • For example, “I want to give a shout-out to my best friend for always supporting me.”
  • In a social media post, someone might say, “I just want to give a shout-out to my amazing followers for all their support.”
  • During an award acceptance speech, a winner might give a shout-out to their family and team members for their contributions.
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