Top 57 Slang For Hurry Up – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced world, time is of the essence. We’ve all been in situations where we need someone to hurry up or speed things along. But did you know that there are various slang phrases and expressions to convey this sense of urgency? Whether you’re looking to add some flair to your conversations or simply want to stay up to date with the latest lingo, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we explore the top slang for hurry up and learn how to keep the pace with style.

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1. Chop chop

This phrase is used to urge someone to move or work quickly. It is often used in a playful or slightly impatient tone.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Time to get ready for school, chop chop!”
  • In a restaurant, a chef might yell, “Chop chop, we need those orders out!”
  • A boss might say to their employees, “We have a deadline to meet, so let’s get to work, chop chop!”

2. ASAP

An acronym that means “as soon as possible.” It is used to indicate that something needs to be done urgently or without delay.

  • For instance, a boss might send an email saying, “I need that report ASAP.”
  • In a text message, someone might write, “Can you pick up some milk on your way home? ASAP!”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Finish your assignments ASAP so we can move on to the next lesson.”

3. Pronto

This word is borrowed from Italian and means “quickly” or “immediately.” It is often used to convey a sense of urgency.

  • For example, a parent might say to their child, “Clean your room, pronto!”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We need those documents on my desk pronto.”
  • A friend might say, “I forgot my wallet at home. Can you bring it to me pronto?”

4. Stat

A term borrowed from the medical field that means “immediately” or “right away.” It is often used to convey a sense of urgency or the need for immediate action.

  • For instance, a doctor might say, “We need to get the patient to the operating room stat!”
  • In a fast-paced workplace, a supervisor might say, “I need those reports on my desk stat.”
  • A coach might yell to their team, “We’re losing! We need to score a goal stat!”

5. Quick sticks

This phrase is used to urge someone to do something quickly or without delay. It is often used in a playful or informal context.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let’s finish this project quick sticks so we can go out and have fun.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might yell, “Get back on defense quick sticks!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Brush your teeth quick sticks before bed.”

6. Double time

This phrase is often used in a military or marching context to indicate that someone should move faster or increase their pace.

  • For example, a drill sergeant might yell, “Double time, soldiers! We need to reach the finish line faster!”
  • In a race, a coach might urge their athlete, “Come on, pick up the pace and go double time!”
  • If someone is running late, a friend might say, “You better go double time if you want to catch the bus!”

7. Snap to it

This phrase is used to tell someone to start or continue doing something immediately and without delay.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “We have a tight deadline, so snap to it and start working!”
  • If someone is procrastinating, a friend might say, “Come on, snap to it and finish your homework!”
  • In a sports game, a coach might yell, “Snap to it, team! We need to score more points!”

8. Get a move on

This phrase is used to tell someone to start moving or acting quickly.

  • For example, if someone is taking too long to get ready, a parent might say, “Get a move on or we’ll be late!”
  • If a group of friends is waiting for someone, they might say, “Come on, get a move on! We’re going to miss the movie!”
  • In a race, a coach might shout, “Get a move on, you’re falling behind!”

9. Step on it

This phrase is used to tell someone to go faster or hurry up.

  • For instance, if someone is driving too slowly, a passenger might say, “Step on it, we’re running late!”
  • In a competition, a coach might urge their athlete, “Step on it and give it your all!”
  • If someone is taking too long to make a decision, a friend might say, “Come on, step on it! We don’t have all day!”

10. Speed it up

This phrase is used to tell someone to go faster or increase their speed.

  • For example, if someone is walking slowly, a friend might say, “Speed it up, we’re almost late!”
  • In a workout class, an instructor might encourage their students, “Come on, speed it up and push yourself!”
  • If someone is talking too slowly, a listener might say, “Speed it up, I don’t have all day!”

11. Make it snappy

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry or do something quickly. It implies a sense of urgency and impatience.

  • For example, a boss might say, “We’re running behind schedule, so make it snappy.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “We need to leave in five minutes, so make it snappy getting ready.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might say to the waiter, “We’re in a hurry, so make it snappy with our order.”

12. Hustle

To hustle means to move or act quickly, often with a sense of urgency or determination. It can also imply working hard or putting in extra effort to achieve a goal.

  • For instance, a coach might say to their team, “Hustle back on defense!”
  • In a business context, a manager might encourage their employees to hustle to meet a deadline.
  • A friend might say to another, “We need to hustle if we want to catch the train.”

13. Rush

To rush means to hurry or move quickly, often due to a time constraint or a sense of urgency. It can also refer to doing something hastily or without proper care.

  • For example, a student might rush to finish their homework before the deadline.
  • In a crowded city, people might rush to catch a bus or train.
  • A person preparing for a presentation might feel rushed to gather all their materials.
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14. Zoom

To zoom means to move quickly or at a high speed. It can refer to physical movement or to the speed of a vehicle or object.

  • For instance, a car might zoom past on the highway.
  • In a video call, someone might say, “Sorry for the shaky camera, I’m zooming around.”
  • A child playing with a toy car might make it zoom across the room.

15. Scoot

To scoot means to move quickly or to shift position in a hurried manner. It can also imply moving aside or making room for someone or something else.

  • For example, a person might scoot over to make space for someone on a crowded bench.
  • A parent might tell their child, “Scoot out of bed, we’re running late.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I have to scoot, I have an appointment to catch.”

16. Hightail it

This slang phrase means to move or leave quickly in order to get somewhere in a hurry.

  • For example, “We need to hightail it to the airport if we want to catch our flight.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll hightail it to the store and grab some groceries before it closes.”
  • In a race, a coach might yell, “Hightail it to the finish line!”

17. Bolt

Bolt is a slang term that means to run or move quickly in order to get somewhere fast.

  • For instance, “I’m going to bolt to the bus stop so I don’t miss my ride.”
  • In a game of tag, someone might say, “Bolt! You’re it!”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “When the whistle blows, bolt towards the goal!”

18. Fly

Fly is a slang term that means to move quickly or to go fast.

  • For example, “I need to fly to my meeting, or I’ll be late.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s fly through this project so we can finish early.”
  • In a car race, a commentator might say, “He’s flying down the track!”

19. Tear

Tear is a slang term that means to move or go quickly, often with a sense of urgency.

  • For instance, “We need to tear through these papers before the deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “I’ll tear to the store and grab some milk before it closes.”
  • In a competition, a coach might say, “Tear to the finish line and give it your all!”

20. Burn rubber

Burn rubber is a slang phrase that means to accelerate a vehicle quickly, often causing the tires to spin and leave skid marks on the road.

  • For example, “He burned rubber as he raced away from the scene.”
  • Someone might say, “Let’s burn rubber and get to the party on time.”
  • A car enthusiast might comment, “That sports car can really burn rubber when it takes off!”

21. Gun it

This phrase means to drive or move at a high speed, usually by pressing the accelerator pedal forcefully. It can also be used figuratively to mean to proceed quickly or forcefully in any activity.

  • For example, if someone is late for work, they might say, “I need to gun it to make it on time.”
  • In a racing context, a driver might be advised, “Gun it off the starting line to gain an early lead.”
  • A person might say, “I have a lot of work to do, so I need to gun it and get started right away.”

22. Go like the clappers

This phrase is used to describe someone or something moving or operating at a very high speed. The term “clappers” is slang for hands, so the phrase implies moving at a speed that is as fast as clapping one’s hands together quickly.

  • For instance, if someone is running late, they might say, “I need to go like the clappers to catch my train.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “He’s going like the clappers down the field, leaving the defenders behind.”
  • A person might exclaim, “The car zoomed past us like the clappers!”

23. Hotfoot it

This phrase means to move or hurry quickly, often with a sense of urgency. It implies moving with the same speed and intensity as if one’s feet were on fire.

  • For example, if someone needs to catch a bus, they might say, “I need to hotfoot it to the bus stop.”
  • In a chase scene in a movie, a character might be instructed, “Hotfoot it out of there before they catch you!”
  • A person might say, “I saw the storm approaching, so I hotfooted it back to the car.”

24. Shake a leg

This phrase is a playful way of telling someone to hurry up or move quickly. It can be used in a variety of situations, from getting ready to leaving a place.

  • For instance, if someone is taking too long to get ready, a friend might say, “Come on, shake a leg! We’re going to be late.”
  • In a military setting, a drill sergeant might command, “Shake a leg, soldiers! We don’t have all day.”
  • A person might say, “We need to shake a leg if we want to catch the early train.”

25. Dash

This word is used to describe moving or hurrying quickly. It can be used in various contexts to convey a sense of urgency or speed.

  • For example, if someone needs to quickly grab something from another room, they might say, “I’ll dash in and grab it.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “He’s dashing towards the finish line, leaving his competitors behind.”
  • A person might say, “I need to dash to the store before it closes.”

26. Race

To move quickly or at a fast pace.

  • For example, “We need to race to catch the bus before it leaves.”
  • A coach might say, “Race to the finish line and give it your all!”
  • In a hurry, someone might say, “I’m late, I need to race to the meeting.”

27. Gallop

To run or move quickly and energetically, like a horse galloping.

  • For instance, “He galloped down the street to catch up with his friends.”
  • A person might say, “I need to gallop to the store before it closes.”
  • In a race, someone might comment, “The horse galloped to victory.”

28. Barrel

To move quickly or hurriedly.

  • For example, “He barreled through the crowd to get to the front.”
  • A person might say, “I need to barrel to the store before it closes.”
  • In a rush, someone might comment, “She barreled down the hallway to catch her flight.”

29. Charge

To move quickly or forcefully.

  • For instance, “He charged across the field to score the winning goal.”
  • A person might say, “I need to charge to the meeting before it starts.”
  • In a hurry, someone might comment, “She charged through the crowd to catch the train.”

30. Sprint

To run at a high speed for a short distance.

  • For example, “He sprinted to catch the bus before it pulled away.”
  • A coach might say, “Sprint to the finish line and give it everything you’ve got!”
  • In a race, someone might comment, “She sprinted past her competitors to win the gold medal.”

31. Push

This slang term is used to urge someone to hurry or move faster. It can be used to express impatience or a sense of urgency.

  • For example, if someone is taking too long to get ready, you might say, “Come on, push! We’re going to be late.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might yell, “Push, push, push! We need to score before the clock runs out!”
  • If you’re in a rush to finish a task, you might tell yourself, “I need to push and get this done as quickly as possible.”

32. Chop-chop

This phrase is often used to tell someone to hurry up or do something quickly. It is believed to have originated from the Cantonese word “kap,” which means fast or urgent.

  • For instance, if you’re waiting for someone to finish a task, you might say, “Chop-chop, we don’t have all day!”
  • In a restaurant, a server might say, “I’ll bring your order to the table, chop-chop.”
  • If you’re running late, a friend might jokingly say, “Get here, chop-chop, or we’ll start without you!”

33. Move it

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to move or act quickly. It can be used to express impatience or a sense of urgency.

  • For example, if someone is walking slowly, you might say, “Come on, move it! We’re running late.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might say, “We have a deadline to meet, so everyone needs to move it.”
  • If you’re in a rush to catch a bus, you might tell yourself, “I need to move it or I’ll miss my ride.”

34. Go-go-go

This phrase is used to encourage someone to start moving or acting quickly. It can be used in various situations to express a sense of urgency or to motivate someone to take action.

  • For instance, if you’re participating in a race, someone might shout, “Go-go-go!” to encourage you to start running.
  • In a military setting, a commander might give the order, “Go-go-go! Move out and secure the area!”
  • If you’re trying to motivate yourself to start a task, you might say, “Okay, let’s go-go-go and get this done!”

35. Get cracking

This slang phrase is used to tell someone to start working or acting quickly. It can be used to express a sense of urgency or to encourage someone to begin a task.

  • For example, if you’re waiting for someone to start a meeting, you might say, “Come on, get cracking! We don’t have all day.”
  • In a group project, a team leader might say, “Let’s get cracking and finish this assignment before the deadline.”
  • If you’re procrastinating on a task, you might tell yourself, “It’s time to get cracking and stop wasting time.”

36. Quicksticks

This slang term is used to urge someone to hurry or to do something quickly.

  • For example, “We need to finish this project quicksticks.”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Put your shoes on quicksticks or we’ll be late for school.”
  • In a sports context, a coach might yell, “Get to the field quicksticks!”

37. PDQ

This acronym stands for “Pretty Damn Quick” and is used to emphasize the need for speed or urgency.

  • For instance, “We need those reports finished PDQ.”
  • A boss might say to an employee, “I need that presentation PDQ.”
  • In a restaurant, a customer might request, “Can I get my food PDQ? I’m in a hurry.”

38. Lickety-split

This phrase is used to describe doing something very quickly or without delay.

  • For example, “We need to clean this room lickety-split.”
  • A person might say, “I finished my homework lickety-split so I could go play outside.”
  • In a race, a commentator might say, “He crossed the finish line lickety-split!”

39. Time is of the essence

This phrase emphasizes the importance of acting quickly or without delay due to limited time.

  • For instance, “We need to find a solution quickly. Time is of the essence.”
  • A doctor might say to a patient, “We need to perform the surgery as soon as possible. Time is of the essence.”
  • In a business negotiation, a person might say, “Let’s make a decision quickly. Time is of the essence.”

40. Cut to the chase

This phrase means to get to the main or important part of something without wasting time.

  • For example, “Stop beating around the bush and cut to the chase.”
  • A person might say in a meeting, “Let’s skip the small talk and cut to the chase.”
  • In a movie review, a critic might say, “The film takes too long to cut to the chase and get to the action.”

41. Move it or lose it

This phrase is used to tell someone to hurry up or risk losing an opportunity or facing negative consequences. It is often used in a playful or teasing manner.

  • For example, a coach might yell at their team, “Move it or lose it, we only have 5 minutes left!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Come on, move it or lose it, we’re going to be late for school!”
  • In a competitive situation, someone might say to their opponent, “You better move it or lose it, I’m not waiting around for you!”

42. Hurry it up

This phrase is a straightforward way of telling someone to hurry up or go faster in completing a task or reaching a destination.

  • For instance, a boss might say to their employee, “Hurry it up, we have a deadline to meet!”
  • A friend might say to their friend who is taking a long time to get ready, “Come on, hurry it up, we’re going to miss the movie!”
  • In a race, one participant might shout to another, “Hurry it up, I’m right behind you!”

43. Quicken the pace

This phrase is used to encourage someone to increase their speed or move faster in order to complete a task or reach a goal more quickly.

  • For example, a teacher might tell their students, “Quicken the pace, we have a lot of material to cover.”
  • A coach might say to their team, “Quicken the pace, we need to score more goals before the end of the game!”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might instruct their employees, “Quicken the pace, we have a tight deadline to meet.”

44. Expedite

This word is used to indicate the need for something to be done or completed more quickly than usual. It often implies a sense of urgency or efficiency.

  • For instance, a customer might request to a customer service representative, “Can you expedite my order? I need it by tomorrow.”
  • A manager might instruct their team, “Let’s expedite the production process to meet the increased demand.”
  • In a legal context, a lawyer might file a motion to expedite a trial, requesting for it to be scheduled sooner than originally planned.
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45. Beat the clock

This phrase is used to describe the act of finishing or accomplishing something before a specified deadline or time limit.

  • For example, a student might say, “I managed to beat the clock and finish my essay just in time.”
  • A chef might challenge themselves to “beat the clock” and cook a meal within a certain time frame.
  • In a game or competition, a participant might strive to “beat the clock” and achieve a new record or personal best time.

46. Accelerate

To increase the speed or rate of something. In the context of “hurry up,” it means to move or act quickly.

  • For example, a coach might say to their team, “We need to accelerate our pace if we want to win this game.”
  • In a work setting, a supervisor might tell their employees, “Please accelerate your progress on this project.”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “We’re running late, let’s accelerate and get there on time.”

47. Quick like a bunny

To move or act with great speed, similar to how a bunny or rabbit moves quickly.

  • For instance, a parent might tell their child, “Brush your teeth quick like a bunny so we can leave for school.”
  • In a race, someone might shout, “Run quick like a bunny to the finish line!”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “We need to pack our bags quick like a bunny so we don’t miss our flight.”

48. Get your skates on

An expression used to tell someone to move quickly or hurry up. It references the idea of putting on ice skates and moving swiftly.

  • For example, a teacher might say to their students, “Get your skates on and finish your assignments before the bell.”
  • In a sports game, a coach might yell to their team, “Get your skates on and get back on defense!”
  • A parent might say to their child, “Get your skates on, we’re running late for the soccer game!”

49. Make haste

To move or act quickly, often in a formal or urgent manner.

  • For instance, a boss might say to their employee, “Make haste and finish this report before the deadline.”
  • In a historical context, a commander might order their troops, “Make haste and prepare for battle!”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “We’re going to miss the movie, let’s make haste and catch the next showing.”

50. On the double

An expression used to emphasize the need for immediate action or movement.

  • For example, a military officer might command their soldiers, “On the double, we need to reach the objective quickly!”
  • In a household, a parent might tell their child, “On the double, we’re late for school!”
  • A friend might say to another friend, “We need to leave now, on the double, or we’ll miss our reservation.”

51. In a jiffy

This phrase means to do something in a very short amount of time or without delay.

  • For example, “I’ll be there in a jiffy!”
  • Someone might say, “I can finish this task in a jiffy.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you pick up some groceries in a jiffy?”

52. Pronto pronto

This is an Italian phrase that means to do something immediately or without delay.

  • For instance, “Get me that report, pronto pronto!”
  • Someone might say, “I need those documents pronto pronto.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you fix the printer, pronto pronto?”

53. Quick as a wink

This phrase means to do something in a very short amount of time or with great speed.

  • For example, “He finished the race quick as a wink.”
  • Someone might say, “I can clean the house quick as a wink.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you finish that project quick as a wink?”

54. Swiftly

This word means to do something with speed or without delay.

  • For instance, “She ran swiftly to catch the bus.”
  • Someone might say, “I need you to complete this task swiftly.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you respond to my email swiftly?”

55. Rapidly

This word means to do something with great speed or at a fast pace.

  • For example, “The car accelerated rapidly.”
  • Someone might say, “We need to finish this project rapidly.”
  • Another might ask, “Can you type up the report rapidly?”

56. Speedy Gonzales

This term is a reference to the cartoon character Speedy Gonzales, who is known for his incredible speed. It is used to encourage someone to move quickly or to describe someone who is moving at a fast pace.

  • For example, “Come on, we need to be like Speedy Gonzales and finish this project!”
  • A coach might say, “You need to be as fast as Speedy Gonzales on the field.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “Wow, she’s running like Speedy Gonzales!”

57. Time’s a-wasting

This phrase is used to urge someone to hurry up and not waste any more time. It emphasizes the importance of being efficient and taking action quickly.

  • For instance, “We need to get going, time’s a-wasting!”
  • A teacher might say, “Finish your assignments, time’s a-wasting.”
  • Someone might remind a procrastinator, “Stop procrastinating, time’s a-wasting!”