Top 73 Slang For Gun In Spanish – Meaning & Usage

Guns have a long and complicated history, and their influence can be seen in various aspects of culture, including language. Spanish, being one of the most widely spoken languages in the world, has its own slang for guns that may not be familiar to everyone.

In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms for gun in Spanish. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or simply curious about different expressions, this list will provide you with an insight into the rich and diverse world of Spanish slang. So, get ready to expand your vocabulary and gain a deeper understanding of the language with us!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Pistola

This is the general term for a firearm in Spanish. It can refer to any type of gun, from handguns to rifles.

  • For example, “La policía encontró una pistola en el coche robado” (The police found a gun in the stolen car).
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might say, “Es importante regular la venta de pistolas” (It is important to regulate the sale of guns).
  • A gangster movie might depict a character saying, “Siempre llevo mi pistola conmigo” (I always carry my gun with me).

2. Chamba

This slang term is commonly used in Latin America to refer to a gun. It is derived from the English word “chamber,” which is a part of a firearm.

  • For instance, “El criminal estaba armado con una chamba” (The criminal was armed with a gun).
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might mention, “Los delincuentes utilizan chambas para cometer robos” (Criminals use guns to commit robberies).
  • A character in a novel might say, “Nunca había sostenido una chamba antes” (I had never held a gun before).

3. Cuerno

This slang term is used to describe a gun in certain regions of Latin America. It is derived from the word “horn” due to the shape of the gun’s barrel resembling a horn.

  • For example, “El narcotraficante llevaba un cuerno en la cintura” (The drug trafficker carried a gun on his waist).
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “El aumento de cuernos ilegales es preocupante” (The increase in illegal guns is concerning).
  • A character in a crime novel might mention, “El detective sacó su cuerno y apuntó al sospechoso” (The detective pulled out his gun and aimed at the suspect).

4. Rosca

This slang term is used to refer to a gun in some Latin American countries. It is derived from the word “screw” due to the twisting motion required to load and unload certain types of guns.

  • For instance, “El ladrón amenazó al dueño de la tienda con una rosca” (The thief threatened the store owner with a gun).
  • In a conversation about gun violence, someone might say, “Es necesario controlar la venta ilegal de roscas” (It is necessary to control the illegal sale of guns).
  • A character in a crime film might say, “No sabía que cargar una rosca era tan complicado” (I didn’t know loading a gun was so complicated).

5. Escopeta

This term refers specifically to a shotgun in Spanish. It is a type of firearm that is designed to fire a shell containing multiple small pellets, commonly used for hunting or self-defense.

  • For example, “El cazador llevaba una escopeta para la caza de aves” (The hunter carried a shotgun for bird hunting).
  • In a discussion about home defense, someone might say, “Muchos prefieren tener una escopeta para proteger su hogar” (Many prefer to have a shotgun to protect their home).
  • A character in a crime novel might mention, “El detective encontró una escopeta en el lugar del crimen” (The detective found a shotgun at the crime scene).

6. Cuchillo

While not directly related to guns, “cuchillo” is Spanish slang for a knife. It can also be used metaphorically to refer to a gun, implying its potential to cause harm or act as a weapon.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “El cuchillo es su mejor amigo en el negocio.”
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might comment, “Prefiero llevar un cuchillo que un arma de fuego.”
  • Another might warn, “Ten cuidado, ese tipo siempre anda armado con un cuchillo.”

7. Misil

While not a direct slang term for guns, “misil” is Spanish for a missile. In some contexts, it can be used metaphorically to refer to a powerful firearm or a weapon with long-range capabilities.

  • For instance, in a military discussion, someone might say, “Los rifles de francotirador son como misiles en manos expertas.”
  • In a conversation about firepower, a person might comment, “Ese fusil es un verdadero misil en el campo de batalla.”
  • Another might use it figuratively, saying, “Su palabra es como un misil, siempre impacta con fuerza.”

8. Lanzallamas

While not directly related to guns, “lanzallamas” is Spanish for a flamethrower. In some contexts, it can be used metaphorically to refer to a powerful firearm or a weapon that unleashes a destructive force.

  • For example, in a discussion about firepower, someone might say, “Ese rifle es como un lanzallamas en términos de potencia de fuego.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous weapons, a person might comment, “Un lanzallamas es mucho más letal que cualquier arma convencional.”
  • Another might use it figuratively, saying, “Sus palabras son como lanzallamas, queman a todos los que se cruzan en su camino.”

9. Rifle de aire

While not a slang term, “rifle de aire” is Spanish for an air rifle. It refers to a type of firearm that uses compressed air to propel a projectile. It can be used to describe an actual air rifle or metaphorically to refer to a firearm in general.

  • For instance, in a hunting discussion, someone might say, “Prefiero cazar con un rifle de aire para una experiencia más desafiante.”
  • In a conversation about firearms, a person might comment, “El rifle de aire es una opción popular para el entrenamiento de tiro.”
  • Another might use it figuratively, saying, “Ese tipo siempre anda armado con su rifle de aire, nunca se sabe qué puede pasar.”

10. Bomba

While not directly related to guns, “bomba” is Spanish for a bomb. In some contexts, it can be used metaphorically to refer to a powerful firearm or a weapon that causes significant damage.

  • For example, in a discussion about firepower, someone might say, “Ese fusil es una verdadera bomba en términos de potencia de fuego.”
  • In a conversation about dangerous weapons, a person might comment, “Una bomba es mucho más devastadora que cualquier arma convencional.”
  • Another might use it figuratively, saying, “Sus palabras son como una bomba, siempre causan un impacto fuerte.”

11. Bala

This term refers to a small projectile that is shot from a firearm. It can also be used figuratively to mean “a shot” or “an attempt”.

  • For example, “El criminal disparó una bala” translates to “The criminal fired a bullet”.
  • In a sports context, one might say, “El jugador hizo un tiro y metió la bala en la red” which means “The player took a shot and put the ball in the net”.
  • In a figurative sense, someone might say, “Voy a darle una bala a esa oportunidad” meaning “I’m going to take a shot at that opportunity”.

12. Gatillo

This term refers to the mechanism on a firearm that is pulled or squeezed to release the firing pin and discharge the weapon. It can also be used metaphorically to mean “the cause” or “the catalyst”.

  • For instance, “El policía apretó el gatillo” translates to “The police officer pulled the trigger”.
  • In a figurative sense, one might say, “El comentario fue el gatillo que desató la pelea” which means “The comment was the trigger that sparked the fight”.
  • Another usage example could be, “El gatillo de la pistola se quedó atascado” which translates to “The trigger of the gun got stuck”.

13. Cerbatana

This term refers to a long, narrow tube used to fire projectiles, typically darts or arrows. It can also be used to describe a person who is a skilled shooter or marksman.

  • For example, “Los indígenas utilizan la cerbatana para cazar” translates to “The indigenous people use the blowgun for hunting”.
  • In a figurative sense, one might say, “Él es una cerbatana con la pelota” which means “He is a sharpshooter with the ball” (referring to someone who is skilled in a specific sport).
  • Another usage example could be, “El cerbatana disparó una flecha con precisión” which translates to “The blowgun shooter shot an arrow with precision”.

14. Granada

This term refers to a small explosive device that is thrown by hand or launched from a launcher. It can also be used to describe something that causes a sudden and intense reaction or impact.

  • For instance, “El soldado lanzó una granada” translates to “The soldier threw a grenade”.
  • In a figurative sense, one might say, “La noticia fue como una granada en la sala” which means “The news was like a grenade in the room” (referring to shocking or explosive news).
  • Another usage example could be, “El equipo hizo una jugada que fue una granada para el equipo contrario” which translates to “The team made a play that was a grenade for the opposing team” (referring to a game-changing move).

15. Mina

This term refers to an explosive device that is buried underground or underwater and is triggered by pressure or proximity. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a situation or topic that is sensitive or potentially explosive.

  • For example, “El soldado pisó una mina y resultó herido” translates to “The soldier stepped on a mine and got injured”.
  • In a figurative sense, one might say, “Ese tema es una mina” which means “That topic is a mine” (referring to a sensitive or controversial subject).
  • Another usage example could be, “El periodista descubrió una mina de información” which translates to “The journalist uncovered a mine of information” (referring to a valuable source of information).

16. Fusil

This is a term used to refer to a long-barreled firearm designed to be fired from the shoulder, usually with a rifled barrel to improve accuracy. The term “fusil” is often used to describe a rifle in Spanish.

  • For example, a hunter might say, “I use a fusil for deer hunting.”
  • In a military context, a soldier might report, “I was trained to handle different types of fusils.”
  • A gun enthusiast might discuss, “The fusil is known for its long-range capabilities and versatility.”

17. Honda

In certain regions of Spanish-speaking countries, “honda” is a term used to refer to a slingshot, which is a weapon that uses a Y-shaped frame with elastic bands attached to propel projectiles. The term “honda” can be used as slang for a gun in some contexts.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He threatened me with a honda.”
  • In a discussion about improvised weapons, someone might mention, “A honda can be a deadly weapon in the right hands.”
  • A storyteller might describe a character as, “He was skilled in using a honda to take down his enemies.”

18. Torpedo

In some Spanish-speaking regions, “torpedo” is a slang term used to refer to a submachine gun, which is a compact automatic firearm that fires pistol-caliber ammunition. The term “torpedo” is often used to describe this type of weapon.

  • For example, a gangster in a movie might say, “I got a torpedo hidden in my jacket.”
  • In a discussion about firearms, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a torpedo and a regular pistol?”
  • A military historian might mention, “Torpedoes were commonly used by law enforcement agencies in the 1920s.”

19. Drone

In certain Spanish-speaking contexts, “drone” can be used as slang for a gun. This usage is derived from the resemblance between a gun’s barrel and the shape of a drone’s body.

  • For instance, a criminal might say, “I’ve got a drone in my backpack.”
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might mention, “Drones are becoming more popular among criminals.”
  • A police officer might report, “We confiscated a drone during a raid on a drug cartel.”

20. Cartucho

In Spanish, “cartucho” is a term used to refer to a cartridge, which is a container holding a projectile, propellant, and primer for firearms. The term “cartucho” can be used as slang for a gun in some contexts.

  • For example, a person might say, “He loaded a cartucho into his pistol.”
  • In a discussion about ammunition, someone might ask, “Where can I buy cartuchos for my rifle?”
  • A firearms enthusiast might mention, “The cartucho is an essential component of any firearm.”

21. Silenciador

This refers to a device attached to the muzzle of a firearm to reduce the noise and muzzle flash produced when the weapon is fired. The term “silenciador” is often used to describe a suppressor in Spanish.

  • For example, a person might say, “He equipped his pistol with a silenciador for stealthy operations.”
  • In a discussion about firearm accessories, someone might ask, “Do you prefer using a silenciador or shooting without one?”
  • A gun enthusiast might mention, “Silenciadores are legal to own in some countries, but heavily regulated in others.”

22. Hacha

While not directly related to firearms, “hacha” can be used as slang for a shotgun in certain contexts. This term originated from the resemblance between the shape of a shotgun’s barrel and the handle of an axe.

  • For instance, in a conversation about weapons, someone might say, “I prefer a hacha for home defense.”
  • In a discussion about firearm terminology, a person might ask, “Have you ever heard of a shotgun being called an hacha?”
  • A gun collector might showcase their shotgun and comment, “This hacha has been in my family for generations.”

23. Calibre

In the context of firearms, “calibre” refers to the internal diameter of a gun barrel or the diameter of the projectile it fires. The term is commonly used to indicate the size or type of a firearm.

  • For example, a person might say, “I prefer a .45 calibre pistol for self-defense.”
  • In a discussion about ballistics, someone might ask, “What is the ideal calibre for hunting deer?”
  • A gun enthusiast might compare different firearms and comment, “The calibre of this rifle provides excellent long-range accuracy.”

24. Dinamita

Although not directly related to firearms, “dinamita” can be used as slang for a powerful firearm or explosive device in certain contexts. This term highlights the destructive capabilities of such weapons.

  • For instance, in a conversation about firepower, someone might say, “He’s carrying a dinamita in his holster.”
  • In a discussion about illegal weapons, a person might mention, “Gangs often use dinamitas to intimidate their rivals.”
  • A crime novel might describe a dangerous criminal as someone who “carries dinamita wherever he goes.”
See also  Top 43 Slang For Styles – Meaning & Usage

25. Bomba de hidrógeno

While not directly related to firearms, “bomba de hidrógeno” can be used as slang to refer to a powerful explosive device or a high-caliber firearm. This term emphasizes the immense destructive power of such weapons.

  • For example, in a conversation about dangerous weapons, someone might say, “He’s got a bomba de hidrógeno hidden in his basement.”
  • In a discussion about military technology, a person might ask, “Have you ever seen a firearm as powerful as a bomba de hidrógeno?”
  • A fictional story might describe a villain as someone who “wields a bomba de hidrógeno with deadly precision.”

In Spanish slang, “navaja” refers to a knife. It is typically used to describe a folding knife with a long blade.

  • For example, a person might say, “Ten cuidado, ese tipo lleva una navaja en el bolsillo” (Be careful, that guy is carrying a knife in his pocket).
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might mention, “Algunas personas prefieren llevar una navaja para protegerse” (Some people prefer to carry a knife for self-defense).

27. Funda

In Spanish slang, “funda” is used to refer to a holster. It is the case or sheath that holds a gun or knife and is typically worn on a person’s body.

  • For instance, a person might say, “El policía sacó su arma de la funda” (The police officer took his gun out of the holster).
  • In a conversation about concealed carry, someone might ask, “¿Dónde puedo comprar una funda para llevar mi arma oculta?” (Where can I buy a holster to carry my concealed weapon?).

28. Machete

In Spanish slang, “machete” refers to a machete. It is a large, heavy knife with a broad blade, often used for cutting through vegetation.

  • For example, someone might say, “Mi abuelo usa un machete para cortar la hierba en su jardín” (My grandfather uses a machete to cut the grass in his garden).
  • In a discussion about survival tools, a person might mention, “Un machete es una herramienta útil para abrirse camino en la selva” (A machete is a useful tool for making your way through the jungle).

29. Gas pimienta

In Spanish slang, “gas pimienta” refers to pepper spray. It is a self-defense weapon that sprays a chemical irritant to incapacitate an attacker.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Las mujeres pueden llevar gas pimienta en sus bolsos para protegerse” (Women can carry pepper spray in their purses for self-defense).
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might ask, “¿Dónde puedo comprar gas pimienta?” (Where can I buy pepper spray?).

30. Gas lacrimógeno

In Spanish slang, “gas lacrimógeno” refers to tear gas. It is a chemical weapon that causes severe eye and respiratory irritation, used for crowd control or in riot situations.

  • For example, a person might say, “La policía lanzó gas lacrimógeno para dispersar a la multitud” (The police used tear gas to disperse the crowd).
  • In a discussion about protests, someone might mention, “Los manifestantes tuvieron que hacer frente al gas lacrimógeno” (The protesters had to deal with tear gas).

31. Pistola semiautomática

This term refers to a type of handgun that uses the energy from the previous shot to reload the chamber for the next shot. It is a popular choice for self-defense and law enforcement use.

  • For example, a gun enthusiast might say, “I prefer a reliable semiautomatic pistol for concealed carry.”
  • In a discussion about firearm safety, someone might emphasize, “Always keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot with a semiautomatic pistol.”
  • A police officer might report, “The suspect was armed with a semiautomatic pistol during the altercation.”

32. Látigo

Although not a direct slang term for a gun, “látigo” is sometimes used metaphorically to refer to a firearm due to its ability to inflict damage from a distance. It implies that the gun has a powerful and fast shooting capability.

  • For instance, in a crime novel, a character might say, “He drew his látigo and fired off a round, striking his target with precision.”
  • In a discussion about firearms, someone might compare the shooting speed of different guns by saying, “The látigo of that pistol is impressive.”
  • A gang member might boast, “I always carry my látigo for protection on the streets.”

33. Armas de fuego

This is a general term for any type of weapon that uses explosive or combustion energy to propel projectiles. It encompasses various types of guns, including pistols, rifles, and shotguns.

  • For example, someone might say, “The possession of firearms is regulated by state and federal laws.”
  • In a discussion about gun control, a person might argue, “We need stricter regulations on firearms to prevent gun violence.”
  • A hunter might say, “I own several firearms for different types of game.”

34. Cuerno de chivo

This term is a slang phrase for an AK-47 assault rifle. It originated from the shape of the rifle’s curved magazine, which resembles a goat’s horn.

  • For instance, in a gang-related movie, a character might say, “He pulled out his cuerno de chivo and started shooting indiscriminately.”
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might mention, “The cuerno de chivo is a popular choice among criminals due to its firepower.”
  • A gun collector might say, “I have a vintage cuerno de chivo from the 1960s.”

35. Armas químicas

Although not a direct slang term for guns, “armas químicas” refers to weapons that use chemicals to harm or kill people. It is included in this list as it represents a different aspect of weaponry.

  • For example, in a discussion about international conflicts, someone might say, “The use of chemical weapons is a violation of international law.”
  • A military expert might explain, “Chemical weapons can cause severe injuries and long-term health effects.”
  • A person advocating for disarmament might argue, “The world needs to come together to eliminate all forms of weapons, including chemical weapons.”

36. Armas de destrucción masiva

This term refers to powerful weapons that have the capability to cause widespread destruction and loss of life. It is often used to describe nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons.

  • For example, in a discussion about global security, someone might say, “The international community must work together to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.”
  • A journalist reporting on military conflicts might mention, “The country is suspected of developing weapons of mass destruction.”
  • In a political debate, someone might argue, “The possession of weapons of mass destruction poses a significant threat to international peace and security.”

37. Carabina

This term refers to a long-barreled firearm that is designed to be fired from the shoulder. It is commonly used for hunting, sport shooting, and military purposes.

  • For instance, a hunter might say, “I prefer using a carabina for hunting deer.”
  • In a discussion about firearms, someone might ask, “What’s the difference between a carabina and a shotgun?”
  • A military historian might mention, “The carabina played a significant role in many historical battles.”

38. Dardo

This term can refer to a type of projectile used in dart games or a small missile. In the context of slang for gun, it is used to describe a small, lightweight firearm.

  • For example, in a discussion about concealed carry weapons, someone might mention, “I always carry a dardo for self-defense.”
  • A police officer might say, “The suspect was armed with a dardo.”
  • In a crime novel, a character might say, “He pulled out a dardo and fired a warning shot.”

39. Explosivo

While not specific to guns, this term can be used to describe firearms that are particularly powerful or have explosive capabilities.

  • For instance, in a discussion about military technology, someone might mention, “The new prototype rifle is equipped with an explosivo round.”
  • A gun enthusiast might say, “I love shooting explosivo ammunition at the range.”
  • In a movie review, a critic might comment, “The action scenes were filled with explosive gunfights.”

40. Lanzagranadas

This term refers to a firearm attachment or standalone weapon that is designed to launch grenades. It can be used in both military and law enforcement contexts.

  • For example, a soldier might say, “I’m trained to use a lanzagranadas as part of my combat duties.”
  • In a discussion about police equipment, someone might ask, “Do officers carry lanzagranadas in their patrol vehicles?”
  • A military historian might mention, “The introduction of the lanzagranadas revolutionized infantry tactics.”

41. Arpón

This term is used metaphorically to refer to a gun, suggesting that it is a powerful weapon capable of piercing or impaling its target. It is not a commonly used slang term for a gun in Spanish.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “El narcotraficante siempre lleva un arpón para protegerse.” (The drug trafficker always carries a harpoon to protect himself.)
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might mention, “Los delincuentes suelen usar arpón para cometer crímenes.” (Criminals often use harpoons to commit crimes.)
See also  Top 25 Slang For Glory – Meaning & Usage

42. Jabalina

This term is used metaphorically to refer to a gun, suggesting that it is a weapon that can be thrown or launched at a target. It is not a commonly used slang term for a gun in Spanish.

  • For instance, in a conversation about firearms, someone might say, “El contrabandista escondía una jabalina en su maleta.” (The smuggler was hiding a javelin in his suitcase.)
  • In a fictional story set in a crime-ridden city, a character might declare, “Si te metes conmigo, te lanzaré una jabalina.” (If you mess with me, I’ll throw a javelin at you.)

43. Katana

This term is used metaphorically to refer to a gun, suggesting that it is a weapon of great precision and deadly force. It is not a commonly used slang term for a gun in Spanish.

  • For example, in a conversation about firearms, someone might say, “El gánster siempre lleva una katana en su cinturón.” (The gangster always carries a katana on his belt.)
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might comment, “A veces, una katana es más efectiva que un arma de fuego.” (Sometimes, a katana is more effective than a firearm.)

44. Mina terrestre

This term is used metaphorically to refer to a gun, suggesting that it is a hidden or concealed weapon that can cause unexpected harm. It is not a commonly used slang term for a gun in Spanish.

  • For instance, in a crime movie, a character might say, “El asesino siempre lleva una mina terrestre en su bolsillo.” (The killer always carries a landmine in his pocket.)
  • In a conversation about illegal firearms, someone might mention, “Las minas terrestres son armas peligrosas y deben ser prohibidas.” (Landmines are dangerous weapons and should be banned.)

45. Plomo

This term is used metaphorically to refer to a gun, suggesting that it is a weapon that delivers lethal force. It is a commonly used slang term for a gun in Spanish, especially in urban settings.

  • For example, in a crime novel, a character might say, “El delincuente sacó el plomo y comenzó a disparar.” (The criminal pulled out the lead and started shooting.)
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might argue, “El fácil acceso al plomo contribuye a la violencia en nuestra sociedad.” (Easy access to lead contributes to violence in our society.)

46. Hierro

This slang term for gun in Spanish refers to the metal material used in the construction of firearms. It is commonly used to describe a gun or firearm.

  • For example, “El narcotraficante llevaba un hierro en la cintura” (The drug dealer carried a gun on his waist).
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Los delincuentes utilizan hierros para cometer robos” (Criminals use guns to commit robberies).
  • A news article might mention, “La policía confiscó varios hierros durante el allanamiento” (The police confiscated several guns during the raid).

47. Chumbo

This slang term for gun in Spanish refers to the lead material used in bullets or ammunition. It is commonly used to describe a gun or firearm.

  • For instance, “El ladrón amenazó al empleado con un chumbo” (The thief threatened the employee with a gun).
  • In a discussion about self-defense, someone might say, “Es importante aprender a manejar un chumbo para protegerse” (It’s important to learn how to handle a gun for self-protection).
  • A crime novel might describe, “El detective sacó su chumbo y apuntó al sospechoso” (The detective pulled out his gun and aimed at the suspect).

48. Cañón

This slang term for gun in Spanish refers to a cannon, which is a large, heavy firearm that shoots projectiles over long distances. It is commonly used to describe a gun or firearm.

  • For example, “El ejército utilizó cañones durante la batalla” (The army used cannons during the battle).
  • In a conversation about historical weapons, someone might say, “Los cañones eran muy efectivos en el campo de batalla” (Cannons were very effective on the battlefield).
  • A documentary might mention, “Los piratas solían atacar con cañones desde sus barcos” (Pirates used to attack with cannons from their ships).

49. Lanza

This slang term for gun in Spanish refers to a spear, which is a long, pointed weapon used for thrusting or throwing. It is commonly used to describe a gun or firearm.

  • For instance, “El delincuente sacó una lanza y amenazó a la víctima” (The criminal pulled out a gun and threatened the victim).
  • In a discussion about crime rates, someone might say, “El uso de lanzas en los robos ha aumentado en los últimos años” (The use of guns in robberies has increased in recent years).
  • A news report might mention, “La policía incautó varias lanzas durante el operativo” (The police seized several guns during the operation).

50. Tumbera

This slang term for gun in Spanish refers to a slingshot, which is a handheld projectile weapon. It is commonly used to describe a gun or firearm.

  • For example, “El pandillero llevaba una tumbera escondida en el bolsillo” (The gang member carried a gun hidden in his pocket).
  • In a conversation about weapon regulations, someone might say, “Es ilegal portar una tumbera sin autorización” (It’s illegal to carry a gun without authorization).
  • A crime movie might depict, “El personaje principal utilizó una tumbera para defenderse” (The main character used a gun to defend himself).

51. Cuete

Cuete is a slang term used in Mexico to refer to a gun. It is derived from the word “cohete,” which means firecracker. The term is often used to describe a small firearm or a handgun.

  • For example, in a crime novel set in Mexico, a character might say, “El narcotraficante tenía un cuete en la cintura” (The drug trafficker had a gun on his waist).
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might warn, “Siempre debes estar alerta y preparado en caso de que alguien saque un cuete” (You should always be alert and prepared in case someone pulls out a gun).
  • A person discussing the use of firearms for self-defense might argue, “Es importante saber cómo usar un cuete de manera responsable y segura” (It is important to know how to use a gun responsibly and safely).

52. Fierro

Fierro is a colloquial term used in Mexico to refer to a gun. The word “fierro” translates to “iron” in English, which is often used metaphorically to describe a firearm’s strength or power.

  • For instance, in a crime movie set in Mexico, a character might say, “El jefe siempre anda cargando su fierro” (The boss always carries his gun).
  • In a discussion about gun control, someone might argue, “Nadie debería tener acceso a los fierros sin pasar por un proceso de verificación exhaustivo” (Nobody should have access to guns without going through a thorough verification process).
  • A person discussing the history of firearms might mention, “El fierro ha sido utilizado como herramienta y arma desde tiempos antiguos” (The gun has been used as a tool and weapon since ancient times).

53. Escuadra

Escuadra is a slang term used in Latin America to refer to a gun. The word “escuadra” translates to “squad” in English, which is often used metaphorically to describe a firearm’s power or effectiveness.

  • For example, in a crime novel set in Colombia, a character might say, “El sicario sacó su escuadra y disparó a quemarropa” (The hitman pulled out his gun and shot at point-blank range).
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might advise, “Siempre es importante mantenerse alejado de personas que porten una escuadra” (It is always important to stay away from people carrying a gun).
  • A person discussing the evolution of firearms might mention, “La escuadra ha sido ampliamente utilizada en el ámbito militar y policial debido a su capacidad de fuego” (The gun has been widely used in the military and law enforcement due to its firepower).

54. Gomera

Gomera is a slang term used in certain Latin American countries, particularly in Venezuela, to refer to a gun. The word “gomera” translates to “sling” in English, which is often used metaphorically to describe a firearm’s ability to launch projectiles.

  • For instance, in a crime movie set in Venezuela, a character might say, “El delincuente sacó su gomera y amenazó a la víctima” (The criminal pulled out his gun and threatened the victim).
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might argue, “La posesión ilegal de gomeras es un problema grave en algunas zonas de Venezuela” (The illegal possession of guns is a serious problem in some areas of Venezuela).
  • A person discussing the impact of firearms on society might mention, “El acceso fácil a gomeras ha contribuido a la escalada de la violencia en ciertas regiones” (Easy access to guns has contributed to the escalation of violence in certain regions).
See also  Top 27 Slang For Likely – Meaning & Usage

55. Pepa

Pepa is a slang term used in certain Latin American countries, particularly in the Caribbean, to refer to a gun. The word “pepa” translates to “seed” in English, which is often used metaphorically to describe a firearm’s potential to cause harm.

  • For example, in a crime novel set in the Dominican Republic, a character might say, “El criminal escondía su pepa en el cajón de la mesita de noche” (The criminal hid his gun in the bedside table drawer).
  • In a conversation about gun control, someone might argue, “Es necesario implementar medidas más estrictas para evitar la proliferación de pepas ilegales” (It is necessary to implement stricter measures to prevent the proliferation of illegal guns).
  • A person discussing the impact of firearms on crime rates might mention, “La presencia de pepas ha contribuido al aumento de la violencia en la región” (The presence of guns has contributed to the increase in violence in the region).

56. Tiro

This term is used to refer to a gunshot or shooting. It can also be used to describe the act of shooting a gun.

  • For example, “Escuché un tiro en la calle” (I heard a shot on the street).
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “Hubo un tiroteo en el centro de la ciudad” (There was a shootout in the city center).
  • A news headline might read, “Hombre herido en un tiroteo en el barrio” (Man injured in a shooting in the neighborhood).

57. Metralleta

This term refers to a submachine gun, which is a lightweight automatic firearm that is smaller than a rifle but larger than a pistol. It is often used in military and law enforcement settings.

  • For instance, “Los soldados estaban armados con metralletas” (The soldiers were armed with submachine guns).
  • In a discussion about weapons, someone might say, “La metralleta es muy efectiva a corta distancia” (The submachine gun is very effective at close range).
  • A movie character might exclaim, “¡Agáchate, vienen con metralletas!” (Duck, they’re coming with submachine guns!)

58. Hechizo

In slang, “hechizo” can be used to refer to a gun. It is often used in urban settings to avoid directly mentioning firearms.

  • For example, “Anda siempre con un hechizo en el bolsillo” (Always carry a spell in your pocket).
  • In a conversation about personal safety, someone might say, “Es mejor tener un hechizo para protegerte” (It’s better to have a spell to protect yourself).
  • A character in a crime novel might say, “El detective sacó su hechizo y apuntó al sospechoso” (The detective pulled out his spell and aimed at the suspect).

59. Bicho

In slang, “bicho” can be used to refer to a gun. It is a colloquial term often used in urban settings.

  • For instance, “El delincuente sacó un bicho y amenazó a la víctima” (The criminal pulled out a bug and threatened the victim).
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might say, “Las pandillas están armadas con bichos” (The gangs are armed with bugs).
  • A character in a crime movie might say, “Escondí un bicho debajo del asiento del auto” (I hid a bug under the car seat).

60. Balazo

This term specifically refers to a gunshot. It is used to describe the sound or the act of firing a gun.

  • For example, “Escuché un balazo en la noche” (I heard a gunshot in the night).
  • In a conversation about crime, someone might say, “El asesino disparó un balazo en la cabeza” (The killer fired a gunshot to the head).
  • A news report might state, “Un hombre resultó herido por un balazo durante un robo” (A man was injured by a gunshot during a robbery).

61. Rata

This term is used to refer to a gun in Spanish slang. It is derived from the word “rat” and is often used in criminal or gang contexts.

  • For example, a gang member might say, “I always carry my rata for protection.”
  • In a crime movie, a character might threaten, “Don’t mess with me, I’ve got a rata in my pocket.”
  • A police officer might warn, “If we catch you with a rata, you’re going to jail.”

62. Matapolicías

This term is used to refer to a gun that is capable of killing police officers. It is a slang term often associated with illegal firearms or weapons used in criminal activities.

  • For instance, a criminal might say, “I need a matapolicías to carry out this job.”
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might argue, “We need stricter regulations to prevent the sale of matapolicías.”
  • A police officer might warn, “If you’re caught with a matapolicías, you’ll face severe consequences.”

63. Cachimba

In some Spanish-speaking regions, “cachimba” is a slang term used to refer to a gun. The term “pipe” is used metaphorically to describe the shape of the firearm.

  • For example, a criminal might say, “I’ve got a cachimba hidden in my jacket.”
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might say, “The streets are filled with cachimbas.”
  • A police officer might report, “We confiscated several cachimbas during the raid.”

64. Pata de cabra

In some Spanish-speaking regions, “pata de cabra” is a slang term used to refer to a gun. The term “crowbar” is used metaphorically to describe the power or force of the firearm.

  • For instance, a gang member might say, “I always carry my pata de cabra for protection.”
  • In a discussion about illegal firearms, someone might argue, “The streets are flooded with pata de cabras.”
  • A police officer might warn, “If we catch you with a pata de cabra, you’re going to jail.”

65. Plomazo

In some Spanish-speaking regions, “plomazo” is a slang term used to refer to a gun. The term “lead shot” is used metaphorically to describe the ammunition or the act of shooting.

  • For example, a criminal might say, “I’ve got a plomazo in my waistband.”
  • In a discussion about gun violence, someone might argue, “We need to address the root causes of plomazos in our communities.”
  • A police officer might report, “The suspect fired several plomazos at the officers.”

66. Chicharra

This slang term for gun is derived from the Spanish word for cicada, a type of insect known for its loud chirping sound. The term “chicharra” is used to describe the sound made by a gun when it is fired.

  • For example, a gangster in a movie might say, “I heard the chicharra go off and knew trouble was coming.”
  • In a conversation about firearms, someone might ask, “Have you ever fired a chicharra before?”
  • A police officer might report, “The suspect was armed with a chicharra during the robbery.”

67. Chilindrón

This slang term for gun is derived from the Spanish word for a traditional meat stew. The term “chilindrón” is used to describe a firearm, likely because of its association with heat and intensity.

  • For instance, a criminal might say, “I’ve got a chilindrón hidden in my jacket.”
  • In a discussion about weapons, someone might comment, “A chilindrón can be a deadly tool in the wrong hands.”
  • A gun enthusiast might say, “I prefer a chilindrón for home defense.”

68. Chaca-chaca

This slang term for gun is derived from the sound that a firearm makes when the slide or bolt is operated. The term “chaca-chaca” is used to mimic this sound and is often associated with the action of chambering a round or preparing a gun for firing.

  • For example, a character in a movie might say, “I heard the chaca-chaca and knew it was time to take cover.”
  • In a conversation about firearms, someone might ask, “Do you know how to do the chaca-chaca?”
  • A police officer might report, “The suspect was armed with a chaca-chaca pistol.”

69. Chilena

This slang term for gun is derived from the word “Chilean,” referring to something or someone from Chile. The term “chilena” is used to describe a firearm, likely because of its association with the country known for its military history.

  • For instance, a gang member might say, “I got this chilena straight from Chile.”
  • In a discussion about weapons, someone might comment, “Chilenas are known for their reliability and durability.”
  • A gun collector might say, “I have a rare Chilena rifle in my collection.”

70. Chilillo

This slang term for gun is derived from the Spanish word for a small chili pepper. The term “chilillo” is used to describe a small or compact firearm, likely because of its association with the size and shape of the chili pepper.

  • For example, a criminal might say, “I always carry a chilillo in my pocket for protection.”
  • In a conversation about concealed carry, someone might ask, “Do you prefer a chilillo for everyday carry?”
  • A gun enthusiast might comment, “Chilillos are great for backup or concealed carry purposes.”

71. Chumbimba

Chumbimba is a slang term used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a gun. It is not a widely recognized term and is more commonly used in certain local communities.

  • For instance, in a conversation about crime, someone might say, “He pulled out his chumbimba and threatened us.”
  • In a story set in a specific neighborhood, a character might mention, “The gang members were armed with chumbimbas.”
  • A person discussing illegal firearms might mention, “There’s a black market for chumbimbas in this area.”

72. Chilero

Chilero is a colloquial term used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to a firearm. It is not a widely recognized term and is more commonly used in certain local communities.

  • For example, in a discussion about self-defense, someone might say, “I always carry my chilero for protection.”
  • In a crime novel set in a specific region, a character might mention, “The criminals were armed with chileros.”
  • A person discussing the illegal firearms trade might mention, “Chileros are often smuggled across the border.”

73. Pum-pum

Pum-pum is a slang term used in some Spanish-speaking countries to refer to the sound of a gunshot. It is not a widely recognized term and is more commonly used in certain local communities.

  • For instance, in a conversation about a shooting incident, someone might say, “I heard a loud pum-pum and knew something was wrong.”
  • In a crime story set in a specific neighborhood, a character might mention, “The pum-pum of gunshots echoed through the streets.”
  • A person discussing the impact of gun violence might say, “The constant pum-pum of gunshots creates a sense of fear in the community.”