Top 97 Slang For Prescription – Meaning & Usage

Prescription medications are a common part of many people’s lives, but did you know that there is a whole world of slang surrounding these drugs? From vitamin V to happy pills, our team has gathered the top slang terms for prescription medications that you may have never heard before. Whether you’re curious or just want to stay in the know, this listicle is sure to provide some eye-opening insights into the hidden language of prescriptions.

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1. Lean

A recreational drug concoction made by mixing prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine with a carbonated soft drink and often a hard candy. It is typically consumed in a manner similar to a cocktail or “soda pop”.

  • For instance, “He was sipping on lean at the party last night.”
  • In a discussion about drug abuse, one might say, “Lean can have dangerous effects on the body and should not be taken lightly.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Are you still using lean? You should consider getting help.”

2. Captain Cody

A slang term for codeine, a prescription opioid medication used to treat pain and cough. “Captain Cody” is a playful nickname often used to refer to codeine in the context of recreational use.

  • For example, “He’s always on the hunt for Captain Cody to get high.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of opioid addiction might say, “Captain Cody can lead to serious health problems if abused.”
  • Another might warn, “Be careful with Captain Cody, it can be highly addictive.”

3. Cody

A shorthand term for codeine, a narcotic pain-reliever and cough suppressant. “Cody” is often used in casual conversation or online discussions to refer to the drug.

  • For instance, “I need to pick up some Cody for my cough.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, one might say, “Cody is often abused for its euphoric effects.”
  • A concerned parent might ask, “Do you know if your child has been using Cody?”

4. Schoolboy

A slang term for Ritalin, a prescription medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. “Schoolboy” is often used to refer to Ritalin because it is commonly prescribed to children and teenagers for ADHD.

  • For example, “He took some schoolboy to help him study for the exam.”
  • A person discussing the misuse of prescription drugs might say, “Schoolboy is sometimes abused by students seeking an academic edge.”
  • Another might warn, “Using schoolboy without a prescription can have serious health consequences.”

5. Sizzurp

A recreational drug concoction made by mixing prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine with a carbonated soft drink and often a hard candy. “Sizzurp” is a slang term often used to refer to this mixture, which is typically purple in color.

  • For instance, “He was sipping on sizzurp all night at the party.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of recreational drug use, one might say, “Sizzurp can have severe health effects and should be avoided.”
  • A concerned friend might ask, “Have you noticed any negative consequences from using sizzurp?”

6. Oxycet

Oxycet is a combination medication that contains oxycodone, a powerful opioid painkiller, and acetaminophen, a common over-the-counter pain reliever. It is typically prescribed for moderate to severe pain.

  • For example, a doctor might say, “I’m going to prescribe you Oxycet to manage your post-surgical pain.”
  • A patient might ask, “How often should I take Oxycet for my chronic back pain?”
  • In a conversation about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Oxycet is one of the commonly abused prescription drugs.”

7. Percs

Percs is a colloquial term for Percocet, a prescription medication that contains oxycodone and acetaminophen. It is used to relieve moderate to severe pain and is classified as an opioid analgesic.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a prescription for Percs to manage my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Percs are often abused and can lead to addiction.”
  • A doctor might ask a patient, “Are you experiencing any side effects from taking Percs?”

8. O

In the context of prescription slang, “O” refers to oxycodone, a potent opioid painkiller. It is commonly prescribed for severe pain and is known for its high potential for abuse and addiction.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can get you some O if you’re looking for pain relief.”
  • In a conversation about opioid abuse, a person might mention, “O is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • A doctor might ask a patient, “Are you currently taking any O for your pain?”

9. Hillbilly Heroin

Hillbilly Heroin is a slang term for OxyContin, a powerful prescription opioid medication. It is used to manage severe pain, but it is also highly addictive and has been associated with the opioid crisis.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Be careful with that Hillbilly Heroin, it can ruin your life.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, a person might mention, “Hillbilly Heroin is one of the drugs driving the crisis.”
  • A doctor might ask a patient, “Have you ever used Hillbilly Heroin before?”

10. Blue

In the context of prescription slang, “blue” refers to oxycodone, a powerful opioid painkiller. The term likely comes from the color of the pill, as oxycodone tablets are often blue in color.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have some blues if you need pain relief.”
  • In a conversation about opioid addiction, a person might mention, “Blues are commonly abused and can lead to dependence.”
  • A doctor might ask a patient, “Have you ever taken blue for your pain?”

11. O.C.

O.C. is a street name for the prescription drug OxyContin, which is a powerful opioid painkiller. The term is derived from the initials of the drug’s brand name.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to pick up some O.C. for my back pain.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “O.C. is one of the commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • A news article might report, “Police seized a large quantity of O.C. pills during a drug bust.”

12. Kickers

“Kickers” is a slang term used to refer to painkillers, particularly prescription opioids. The term may be derived from the idea that these medications “kick” away pain and discomfort.

  • For instance, a person might ask, “Do you have any kickers? I have a headache.”
  • In a conversation about addiction, someone might say, “I started with kickers for my back pain, and it spiraled into addiction.”
  • A doctor might caution, “It’s important to use kickers only as prescribed and for a limited duration.”

13. Killers

In the context of slang for prescription drugs, “killers” is a term used to refer to prescription painkillers, particularly opioids. The term may allude to the strong analgesic effects of these medications.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m out of killers. Can you get me some more?”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “Abuse of killers is a major concern.”
  • A news headline might read, “Authorities crack down on illegal distribution of killers.”

14. Apache

Apache is a street name for the prescription drug hydrocodone, which is a powerful opioid painkiller. The term “Apache” may be derived from the drug’s brand name or its association with pain relief.

  • For instance, a person might ask, “Do you know where I can find Apache? I have a toothache.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Apache is one of the commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a large quantity of Apache pills during a drug raid.”

15. China Girl

China Girl is a slang term for the prescription drug fentanyl, which is a synthetic opioid painkiller. The term “China Girl” may refer to the drug’s origin or its association with the effects it produces.

  • For example, a person might say, “I can get you some China Girl if you need stronger pain relief.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of fentanyl overdoses, someone might mention, “China Girl is a highly potent and dangerous drug.”
  • A news headline might read, “China Girl linked to a spike in opioid-related deaths.”

16. China White

China White is a slang term for a type of highly potent and pure heroin. The term is often used to describe a white or off-white powder that is typically imported from Southeast Asia or China.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “He got busted with a bag of China White.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of heroin, someone might mention, “China White is known for its high purity and potency.”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a large quantity of China White in a drug bust.”

17. Jackpot

Jackpot is a term used to describe a significant find or score of drugs, particularly prescription medications. It implies that the person has come across a substantial amount of drugs that can be sold or used.

  • For instance, a drug dealer might say, “I hit the jackpot with this shipment of painkillers.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Finding a jackpot of prescription drugs can be dangerous for someone struggling with addiction.”
  • A news headline might read, “Police seize jackpot of prescription pills in major drug bust.”

18. Murder 8

Murder 8 is a slang term for the prescription painkiller oxycodone. The term originated from the pill’s markings, which often include the number 8. It is a powerful opioid analgesic used to relieve severe pain.

  • For example, a drug user might say, “Do you have any murder 8?”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “The abuse of murder 8 has contributed to the rise in overdose deaths.”
  • A doctor might warn, “Prescribing murder 8 requires careful consideration of the patient’s pain management needs.”

19. Friend

Friend is a slang term for the prescription anti-anxiety medication Xanax. The term is often used to refer to Xanax in a discreet or coded manner.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Do you have any friends?” to discreetly ask for Xanax.
  • In a conversation about the misuse of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “Many people turn to friends for anxiety relief.”
  • A news article might report, “The illegal sale of friends on the black market is a growing concern.”

20. Vics

Vics is a slang term for the prescription painkiller Vicodin, which contains a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen. The term is often used to refer to Vicodin in a shortened and casual manner.

  • For example, a person might ask, “Do you have any vics?” to inquire about Vicodin.
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Vics are commonly abused painkillers.”
  • A doctor might explain, “Vics can be effective for short-term pain relief, but long-term use can lead to dependence and addiction.”

21. Vicos

Vicos is a slang term for Vicodin, which is a brand name for a prescription pain medication that contains a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen. Vicodin is classified as an opioid and is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

  • For example, someone might say, “I just got a prescription for Vicos after my surgery.”
  • In a discussion about pain management, one might mention, “Vicos can be effective for short-term pain relief.”
  • A person discussing the misuse of prescription drugs might warn, “Using Vicos without a prescription can be dangerous and addictive.”

22. Hydros

Hydros is a slang term for hydrocodone, which is a prescription opioid medication used to relieve moderate to severe pain. Hydrocodone is often combined with other medications, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen, and is available in various forms.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have a prescription for Hydros to manage my chronic pain.”
  • In a discussion about opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Hydros can be highly addictive if not used as prescribed.”
  • A doctor might explain, “Hydros are typically prescribed for short-term pain relief after surgery or injury.”

23. Scratch

In the context of slang for prescription drugs, “scratch” is a term used to refer to a prescription medication.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my scratch from the pharmacy.”
  • In a conversation about medication management, a person might ask, “Do you have any extra scratch for my headache?”
  • A person discussing the misuse of prescription drugs might warn, “Be cautious of sharing your scratch with others, as it can be dangerous and illegal.”

24. Norco

Norco is a brand name for a prescription medication that contains a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen. It is classified as an opioid and is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

  • For instance, someone might say, “My doctor prescribed Norco for my back pain.”
  • In a discussion about pain management, one might mention, “Norco can be effective for short-term relief of acute pain.”
  • A person discussing the potential side effects of opioid medications might warn, “Norco can cause drowsiness and should not be taken with alcohol.”

25. Tabs

In the context of slang for prescription drugs, “tabs” is a term used to refer to tablets or pills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my tabs with food.”
  • In a conversation about medication dosages, a person might ask, “How many tabs should I take per day?”
  • A doctor might explain, “Tabs are a common form of medication and can be easily swallowed with water.”

26. Black Tar

“Black Tar” is a slang term for a specific type of heroin that is dark and sticky in appearance. It is typically produced in Mexico and is known for its impurities and high risk of addiction and overdose.

  • For example, a user might say, “I used to be addicted to black tar, but I’ve been clean for two years now.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug use, someone might mention, “Black tar heroin is particularly dangerous because of its high potency.”
  • A healthcare professional might explain, “Black tar heroin is often cut with harmful substances, which can lead to serious health complications.”

27. H

The letter “H” is a common street name or abbreviation for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. The use of this term is often associated with the drug culture and may be used to discreetly discuss or refer to heroin.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s been struggling with an addiction to H for years.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might ask, “Have you ever tried H?”
  • A news article might report, “Law enforcement seized a large quantity of H in a drug bust.”

28. Mud

In the context of drug slang, “mud” is a term used to refer to heroin. The term likely originates from the brownish color and texture of heroin, which can resemble mud or dirt.

  • For example, a user might say, “I can’t believe how deep I’ve fallen into the world of mud.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of substance abuse, someone might mention, “Mud is a highly addictive drug with devastating consequences.”
  • A healthcare professional might explain, “Mud is a street name for heroin, a potent opioid that can lead to severe physical and psychological dependence.”

29. Dragon

The term “dragon” is a slang term for heroin. The origin of this term is unclear, but it may refer to the mythical creature’s association with power and destruction, reflecting the addictive and destructive nature of heroin.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He’s been chasing the dragon for years, and it’s taken a toll on his life.”
  • In a conversation about drug addiction, someone might ask, “Have you ever encountered the dragon?”
  • A news article might report, “Authorities seized a significant amount of dragon in a drug raid.”

30. Skunk

In the context of drug slang, “skunk” is a term used to refer to a potent strain of marijuana. This strain is known for its strong odor, which resembles that of a skunk, hence the name.

  • For example, a user might say, “I got some skunk from my dealer, and it’s the best I’ve ever had.”
  • In a discussion about different types of marijuana, someone might mention, “Skunk is known for its high THC content and distinct aroma.”
  • A cannabis enthusiast might explain, “Skunk is a popular choice among experienced users due to its potent effects.”

31. Thunder

“Thunder” is a slang term for the prescription drug OxyContin, which is a powerful opioid painkiller. The term is often used to discreetly refer to the drug in conversations or online forums.

  • For example, someone might say, “Do you know where I can find some thunder?”
  • In a discussion about prescription drug abuse, one might mention, “Thunder is highly addictive and can have serious health consequences.”
  • A user on an online forum might ask, “Has anyone tried thunder for chronic pain?”

32. Big H

The term “Big H” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. The term is often used on the street or in drug culture to refer to heroin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s hooked on the Big H.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug addiction, one might mention, “Big H can lead to devastating consequences.”
  • A person discussing the opioid epidemic might say, “Many people turn to Big H as a cheaper alternative to prescription painkillers.”

33. Smack

The term “smack” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. The term is often used in drug culture to refer to heroin.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s been using smack for years.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug abuse, one might mention, “Smack can have severe physical and psychological effects.”
  • A person discussing the rise in heroin use might say, “Many individuals start with prescription opioids and then turn to smack.”

34. Dope

The term “dope” is a slang term for heroin, a highly addictive and illegal opioid drug. The term is often used in drug culture to refer to heroin.

  • For instance, someone might say, “He’s addicted to dope.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, one might mention, “Dope is responsible for a significant number of overdose deaths.”
  • A person discussing the impact of drugs on communities might say, “The presence of dope has led to increased crime rates and public health issues.”

35. Monkey

The term “monkey” is a slang term for the prescription drug Xanax, which is a benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. The term is often used informally to refer to Xanax in conversations or online discussions.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need a monkey to calm my nerves.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, one might mention, “Many individuals abuse monkey for its sedative effects.”
  • A user on an online forum might ask, “What’s the best way to taper off monkey without experiencing withdrawal symptoms?”

36. M

This is a powerful painkiller that is often prescribed for severe pain. “M” is a slang term used to refer to morphine, particularly in the context of illicit use or abuse.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s hooked on M and can’t function without it.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid crisis, someone might mention, “M is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I was prescribed M after my surgery, but I had to be careful not to become dependent on it.”

37. Miss Emma

This is another term for morphine, specifically referring to morphine sulfate. The term “Miss Emma” is a slang term that is often used in urban settings.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I got some Miss Emma to help with my back pain.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of opioid addiction, someone might mention, “Miss Emma is highly addictive and can lead to serious health problems.”
  • A person sharing their personal story might say, “I was prescribed Miss Emma after my surgery, but I had to be careful not to develop a dependence.”

38. White Stuff

While “white stuff” can refer to various substances, it is often used as slang for cocaine. Cocaine is a powerful stimulant drug that is illegal in most countries.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always snorting that white stuff.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug abuse, someone might mention, “Using white stuff can lead to addiction, health problems, and legal issues.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to be addicted to white stuff, but I got help and turned my life around.”

39. Addy

This is a prescription medication that contains amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. Adderall is commonly prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. “Addy” is a slang term often used to refer to Adderall, particularly in recreational or non-medical contexts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I took an Addy to help me study for the exam.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “Addy is often abused by students seeking to enhance their academic performance.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to rely on Addy to stay focused, but I realized it was negatively impacting my health and stopped taking it.”

40. Amp

Amphetamine is a stimulant drug that is often prescribed for ADHD and narcolepsy. “Amp” is a slang term used to refer to amphetamine, particularly in the context of illicit use or abuse.

  • For example, someone might say, “He’s always popping amps to stay awake.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug addiction, someone might mention, “Amp is a highly addictive substance with serious health consequences.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I used to abuse amps to stay focused, but it took a toll on my mental and physical health.”

41. Beans

Beans is a slang term used to refer to amphetamines or prescription stimulant medications. These drugs are often prescribed for conditions like ADHD or narcolepsy. They are called beans due to their resemblance to small, round pills.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my beans to stay focused during exams.”
  • In a discussion about recreational drug use, a person might mention, “Some people abuse beans to stay awake for long periods.”
  • A user might ask, “Where can I find reliable information about the effects of beans?”

42. Cartwheels

Cartwheels is a slang term used to refer to oxycodone or other prescription opioids. These drugs are powerful pain relievers that can be highly addictive. The term cartwheels may be used due to the spinning sensation some people experience when under the influence of these drugs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m in so much pain, I need some cartwheels to get through the day.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, a person might mention, “Abuse of cartwheels has led to a rise in overdose deaths.”
  • A user might ask, “What are the dangers of using cartwheels recreationally?”

43. Chalk

Chalk is a slang term used to refer to cocaine or cocaine-based drugs. Cocaine is a powerful stimulant that is often abused for its euphoric effects. The term chalk may be used due to the white, powdery appearance of cocaine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I saw him snorting chalk in the bathroom.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of drug addiction, a person might mention, “Cocaine and other chalk-based drugs can have devastating effects on a person’s health.”
  • A user might ask, “What are the signs of someone struggling with a chalk addiction?”

44. Christina

Christina is a slang term used to refer to codeine or prescription cough syrup that contains codeine. Codeine is an opioid medication that is sometimes abused for its sedative and pain-relieving effects. The term Christina may be used due to its similarity in sound to codeine.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m sipping on some Christina to help with my cough.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of prescription drug abuse, a person might mention, “Abusing Christina can lead to addiction and other serious health problems.”
  • A user might ask, “What are the potential side effects of using Christina recreationally?”

45. Diamonds

Diamonds is a slang term used to refer to Xanax or other benzodiazepine medications. Benzodiazepines are prescribed for conditions like anxiety and insomnia. The term diamonds may be used due to the diamond-shaped appearance of Xanax tablets.

  • For example, someone might say, “I took a couple of diamonds to help me relax.”
  • In a discussion about the risks of benzodiazepine abuse, a person might mention, “Diamonds can be highly addictive and can cause severe withdrawal symptoms.”
  • A user might ask, “What are the potential dangers of mixing diamonds with alcohol or other drugs?”

46. Dolls

This slang term is used to refer to prescription pills, particularly ones that are used for recreational purposes. It is derived from the small, round shape of many pills, resembling dolls or small figures.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my dolls from the pharmacy.”
  • In a conversation about drug use, a person might mention, “I’ve tried a few different dolls, but none of them really worked for me.”
  • Another person might warn, “Be careful with those dolls, they can be addictive.”

47. Dominoes

This slang term is used to refer to prescription pills, particularly ones that are taken for recreational purposes. The term “dominoes” is used because pills are often stacked and resemble the domino game pieces.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ve got a stash of dominoes if you’re interested.”
  • In a discussion about drug use, a person might mention, “I’ve tried different types of dominoes, but they all have different effects.”
  • Another person might warn, “Don’t mess with dominoes, they can be dangerous.”

48. Footballs

This slang term specifically refers to Xanax, a prescription medication used to treat anxiety disorders. The term “footballs” is used because Xanax pills are small and shaped like American footballs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a prescription for footballs to help with my panic attacks.”
  • In a conversation about anxiety medication, a person might mention, “I prefer footballs over other anti-anxiety medications.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you have any footballs left? I’m feeling really anxious.”

49. Hearts

This slang term is used to refer to amphetamines, a type of stimulant medication that is often prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The term “hearts” is used because amphetamine pills are sometimes shaped like hearts.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I take hearts to help me focus and stay awake.”
  • In a discussion about ADHD medication, a person might mention, “I’ve tried different brands of hearts, but they all have similar effects.”
  • Another person might warn, “Using hearts without a prescription can have serious health consequences.”

50. Jelly Beans

This slang term is used to refer to prescription pills in general. The term “jelly beans” is used because pills are often small and colorful, resembling jelly beans.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my jelly beans with food.”
  • In a conversation about medication, a person might mention, “I have a variety of jelly beans in my medicine cabinet.”
  • Another person might ask, “Do you have any spare jelly beans? I forgot to refill my prescription.”

51. Little Bombs

This term refers to amphetamines, which are stimulant drugs that increase alertness and energy. “Little bombs” implies that these drugs have a powerful and explosive effect on the user’s energy levels.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took some little bombs to help me stay awake all night studying.”
  • In a discussion about recreational drug use, someone might mention, “Little bombs are popular among partygoers looking for an energy boost.”
  • A warning about the dangers of amphetamines might include, “Abusing little bombs can have serious consequences for your physical and mental health.”

52. Morning Shot

This term refers to prescription stimulant medications, such as Adderall or Ritalin, that are commonly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). “Morning shot” suggests that these medications are taken in the morning to provide a boost of focus and energy for the day.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need my morning shot of medication to help me concentrate at work.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription stimulants, someone might mention, “Taking a morning shot without a prescription can lead to addiction and other health problems.”
  • A student might say, “I rely on my morning shot to help me stay focused during long study sessions.”

53. Peaches

This term refers to Xanax, which is a brand name for the prescription drug alprazolam. “Peaches” is a colloquial term that comes from the peach-colored tablets commonly associated with this medication.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took a couple of peaches to help me relax before my flight.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of benzodiazepines, someone might mention, “Peaches can be highly addictive and should only be used under medical supervision.”
  • A person sharing their personal experience might say, “I used to rely on peaches to manage my anxiety, but I’ve since found healthier coping mechanisms.”

54. Pep Pills

This term refers to amphetamine-based medications, such as Dexedrine or Vyvanse, that are used to treat conditions like ADHD or narcolepsy. “Pep pills” suggests that these medications provide a burst of energy and increased alertness.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need my pep pills to help me stay focused and awake during long work shifts.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription stimulants, someone might mention, “Pep pills can be abused for their stimulant effects, leading to addiction and other health problems.”
  • A student might say, “I rely on my pep pills to give me the energy and focus I need to study for exams.”

55. Rippers

This term refers to opioids, which are a class of drugs that include prescription pain medications like oxycodone or hydrocodone. “Rippers” suggests that these drugs provide intense pain relief and can “rip away” the sensation of pain.

  • For example, a person might say, “I took a couple of rippers to help manage my chronic back pain.”
  • In a discussion about the opioid epidemic, someone might mention, “Rippers can be highly addictive and have led to a widespread public health crisis.”
  • A person sharing their recovery journey might say, “I used to rely on rippers to numb my emotional pain, but I’ve since found healthier ways to cope.”

56. Roses

This slang term refers to prescription pills, often used to refer to painkillers or opioids. It derives from the appearance of some pills which are round and white, resembling the shape and color of roses.

  • For example, a person might say, “I need to pick up my roses from the pharmacy.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might mention, “Roses are a serious problem in our community.”
  • A person discussing addiction recovery might say, “I used to be hooked on roses, but now I’m clean.”

57. Turnabouts

This term is used to refer to prescription medication, particularly those used for medical purposes. It suggests that these medications can bring about a change or “turnabout” in a person’s health or condition.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Do you have any turnabouts for my headache?”
  • In a discussion about the importance of following doctor’s orders, someone might say, “Always take your turnabouts as prescribed.”
  • A person sharing their experience with medication might say, “I’ve been on turnabouts for my anxiety and it has made a significant difference in my life.”

58. Zoomers

This slang term refers to amphetamines, which are stimulant drugs often prescribed for conditions like attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The term “zoomers” suggests the energizing and stimulating effects of these medications.

  • For example, someone might say, “I took my zoomers and now I can focus on my work.”
  • In a discussion about the misuse of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “Zoomers are often abused for their euphoric effects.”
  • A person sharing their experience with ADHD medication might say, “Zoomers have helped me manage my symptoms and improve my productivity.”

59. Script

This slang term is used to refer to a prescription, which is a written order from a healthcare professional for a specific medication. It implies that obtaining prescription drugs requires having a legitimate prescription or “script”.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to get my script refilled at the pharmacy.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of following medical advice, someone might say, “Never take medications without a valid script.”
  • A person discussing the misuse of prescription drugs might mention, “Many people obtain scripts illegally to feed their addiction.”

60. Rx

This term is used as an abbreviation for “prescription”. It is commonly seen on medication labels, indicating that the drug requires a prescription from a healthcare professional.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to get an Rx from my doctor for this medication.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of prescription drugs, someone might mention, “Some medications are available over-the-counter, while others require an Rx.”
  • A person sharing their experience with a prescribed medication might say, “I’ve been on this Rx for a month and it has greatly improved my condition.”

61. Meds

A shortened term for medications, often used in casual conversation or informal settings. “Meds” can refer to prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, or any other type of medicine.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to remember to take my meds every morning.”
  • In a discussion about managing health, a person might ask, “What meds are you currently taking?”
  • Another might share, “I just picked up my meds from the pharmacy and they were really expensive.”

62. Pills

A common term for prescription medications that are in tablet or capsule form. The term “pills” is often used to refer to any type of medication that is taken orally.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to take my pills with food.”
  • In a conversation about different forms of medication, a person might ask, “Do you prefer pills or liquid medicine?”
  • Another might mention, “I have a hard time swallowing large pills, so I prefer capsules.”

63. Vitamins

While not exclusively prescription medications, vitamins are often included in discussions about medications and health. Vitamins are substances that the body needs in small amounts for normal functioning and are often taken as supplements in pill or liquid form.

  • For example, someone might say, “I take a daily multivitamin to ensure I’m getting all the necessary nutrients.”
  • In a conversation about health and wellness, a person might ask, “Do you take any vitamins or supplements?”
  • Another might mention, “I recently started taking vitamin D supplements because I have a deficiency.”

64. Drugs

While “drugs” can refer to any type of substance that has a physiological effect when ingested or otherwise introduced into the body, it is often used colloquially to refer to illegal or recreational substances. In the context of prescription slang, “drugs” can refer to prescription medications.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have to pick up my drugs from the pharmacy.”
  • In a discussion about substance abuse, a person might ask, “Have you ever struggled with drugs?”
  • Another might mention, “Prescription drugs can be just as dangerous as illegal drugs if not used properly.”

65. Prescrips

A shortened term for prescriptions, referring to the written order from a healthcare provider for a specific medication or treatment. “Prescrips” is often used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to refill my prescrips at the pharmacy.”
  • In a discussion about healthcare, a person might ask, “How often do you need to get new prescrips?”
  • Another might mention, “It’s important to follow your doctor’s prescrips to ensure the medication is effective.”

66. Scripts

This term is used to refer to prescription medications. It is derived from the word “prescriptions” and is often used in informal or slang settings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to refill my scripts at the pharmacy.”
  • A person discussing their medication might mention, “I have a few different scripts that I take daily.”
  • In a conversation about drug abuse, someone might say, “People sometimes sell their scripts on the black market.”

67. Medz

This is a shorthand term for medications or prescription drugs. It is commonly used in online forums or informal conversations.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Where can I buy cheap medz online?”
  • A person talking about their health might say, “I’m on a few different medz for my condition.”
  • In a discussion about the cost of healthcare, someone might comment, “The price of medz keeps going up.”

68. Pillsies

This term is used to refer to prescription pills or medications. It is a playful or informal way of talking about prescription drugs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my pillsies before bed.”
  • A person discussing their medication might mention, “I have a whole bunch of different pillsies to take each day.”
  • In a conversation about the dangers of misusing prescription drugs, someone might say, “People need to be careful with their pillsies and only take them as prescribed.”

69. Tabsies

This term is used to refer to prescription tablets or medications that come in tablet form. It is a casual or slang way of talking about prescription drugs.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Do you have any tabsies for headaches?”
  • A person talking about their medication might say, “I have to take a couple of tabsies with my breakfast.”
  • In a discussion about different forms of medications, someone might comment, “I prefer tabsies over capsules because they’re easier to swallow.”

70. Vitamies

This term is used to refer to prescription vitamins or dietary supplements. It is a playful or informal way of talking about these types of medications.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my vitamies from the pharmacy.”
  • A person discussing their health routine might mention, “I take a few different vitamies every morning.”
  • In a conversation about the benefits of vitamins, someone might say, “I’ve noticed a difference in my energy levels since starting my vitamies.”

71. Medies

This is a slang term used to refer to prescription medications. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my medies from the pharmacy.”
  • In a conversation about managing chronic conditions, a person might mention, “I take several different medies to control my symptoms.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any extra medies? I ran out and can’t get a refill until next week.”

72. Prescrippies

This slang term is used to describe prescription medications. It is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to these types of drugs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a bunch of prescrippies in my medicine cabinet.”
  • In a discussion about the dangers of prescription drug abuse, a person might warn, “Be careful with those prescrippies – they can be addictive.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find prescrippies without a prescription? I need them for a party.”

73. Meddies

This is a slang term used to refer to prescription medications. It is a shortened version of “medications” and is commonly used in informal conversations.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my meddies before bed.”
  • In a discussion about managing chronic illnesses, a person might mention, “I have a whole list of meddies I take every day.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any spare meddies? I forgot to refill my prescription.”

74. Pillsicles

This slang term is used to describe prescription medications, particularly in pill form. It is a playful and creative way to refer to these types of drugs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a whole stash of pillsicles in my medicine cabinet.”
  • In a conversation about the potential side effects of prescription drugs, a person might mention, “I experienced some weird reactions to certain pillsicles.”
  • A person might ask, “Where can I find pillsicles without a prescription? I need them for a quick fix.”

75. Tabbies

This slang term is used to refer to prescription medications in tablet form. It is a casual and colloquial way to describe these types of drugs.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my tabbies with food.”
  • In a discussion about different forms of prescription medications, a person might mention, “I prefer tabbies over capsules because they’re easier to swallow.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you have any extra tabbies? I forgot to pick up my prescription refill.”

76. Vites

This slang term refers to prescription vitamins or supplements that are prescribed by a doctor. It is a shortened version of the word “vitamins”.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to pick up my vites from the pharmacy.”
  • A person discussing their health regimen might mention, “My doctor prescribed me some vites to boost my immune system.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you take any vites for your overall wellness?”

77. Prescrippos

This term is a playful slang word for prescriptions. It is often used to refer to the medications that are prescribed by a doctor.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a bunch of prescrippos to pick up at the pharmacy.”
  • A person discussing their medical conditions might mention, “I’m on a few different prescrippos for my chronic pain.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you ever had any bad reactions to prescrippos?”

78. Vits

This slang term is a shortened version of the word “vitamins”. It is often used to refer to prescription vitamins or supplements that are prescribed by a doctor.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to remember to take my vits every morning.”
  • A person discussing their health routine might mention, “My doctor recommended some vits to help with my energy levels.”
  • Another might ask, “What vits do you take to support your immune system?”

79. Painkillers

This slang term refers to prescription medications that are used to relieve pain. It is often used to describe strong pain medications such as opioids.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a prescription for painkillers after my surgery.”
  • A person discussing their chronic pain might mention, “I rely on painkillers to manage my daily discomfort.”
  • Another might ask, “Do you think painkillers are an effective solution for long-term pain?”

80. Antidepressants

This term refers to prescription medications that are used to treat depression. It is often used to describe medications that help regulate mood and alleviate symptoms of depression.

  • For example, someone might say, “I started taking antidepressants to help with my anxiety.”
  • A person discussing their mental health journey might mention, “Finding the right antidepressant can make a world of difference.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you ever tried any natural alternatives to antidepressants?”

81. Antacids

Antacids are medications that help neutralize stomach acid and relieve symptoms of heartburn, indigestion, and acid reflux. The term “Tummy Tamers” is a playful way to refer to antacids.

  • For example, “I had some spicy food last night, so I popped a couple of Tummy Tamers to avoid heartburn.”
  • A person might say, “I always keep a bottle of Tummy Tamers in my purse, just in case.”
  • Another might joke, “Antacids are like magic. They turn my fiery stomach into a calm sea of relief.”

82. Antibiotics

Antibiotics are medications used to treat bacterial infections. They work by killing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. The term “Wonder Drugs” is often used to highlight the effectiveness and life-saving potential of antibiotics.

  • For instance, “I had a terrible sinus infection, but a round of Wonder Drugs cleared it right up.”
  • A person might say, “I’m so grateful for modern medicine and the existence of Wonder Drugs.”
  • Another might share, “My doctor prescribed me some Wonder Drugs to fight off a stubborn infection.”

83. Antihistamines

Antihistamines are medications that help relieve symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, itching, and runny nose, by blocking the effects of histamine in the body. The term “Sneeze Stoppers” playfully refers to antihistamines.

  • For example, “My allergies were acting up, so I took a couple of Sneeze Stoppers to get through the day.”
  • A person might say, “Sneeze Stoppers are a must-have during allergy season.”
  • Another might recommend, “If you’re prone to allergies, always keep some Sneeze Stoppers in your medicine cabinet.”

84. Anticoagulants

Anticoagulants are medications that help prevent blood clots from forming or getting larger. They are often prescribed to people at risk of blood clots or those with certain medical conditions. The term “Clot Busters” is a colloquial way to refer to anticoagulants.

  • For instance, “My doctor put me on Clot Busters after my surgery to prevent any blood clots.”
  • A person might say, “Clot Busters are essential for people with certain heart conditions.”
  • Another might share, “I have to take Clot Busters every day to manage my condition.”

85. Diuretics

Diuretics are medications that help increase urine production and promote the removal of excess fluid from the body. They are often prescribed to treat conditions such as high blood pressure and edema. The term “Pee Pills” is a lighthearted slang for diuretics.

  • For example, “I’m on Pee Pills to help reduce the swelling in my ankles.”
  • A person might say, “Pee Pills are great for getting rid of bloating.”
  • Another might joke, “I take Pee Pills before long road trips to avoid frequent bathroom breaks.”

86. Insulin

Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels in the body. In slang terms, it is sometimes referred to as “sugar.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to take my sugar before I eat.”
  • A person with diabetes might ask, “Do you have any sugar on you?” referring to their insulin.
  • In a conversation about managing diabetes, one might say, “I rely on my sugar to keep my blood sugar in check.”

87. Beta-blockers

Beta-blockers are a type of medication that helps reduce the effects of stress hormones on the body. In slang terms, they are sometimes called “chill pills.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to take my chill pills before a big presentation.”
  • A person discussing their anxiety management might mention, “I rely on my chill pills to keep me calm.”
  • In a conversation about stress relief, one might say, “Sometimes you just need to pop a couple of chill pills.”

88. Statins

Statins are a type of medication used to lower cholesterol levels in the body. In slang terms, they are sometimes referred to as “cholesterol busters.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I take my cholesterol busters every night before bed.”
  • A person discussing their heart health might mention, “My doctor put me on cholesterol busters to keep my levels in check.”
  • In a conversation about maintaining a healthy lifestyle, one might say, “Exercise and diet are important, but sometimes you need a little help from cholesterol busters.”

89. NSAIDs

NSAIDs (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) are a type of medication used to relieve pain and reduce inflammation. In slang terms, they are sometimes referred to as “painkillers.”

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to take my painkillers for this headache.”
  • A person discussing their chronic pain management might mention, “I rely on my painkillers to get through the day.”
  • In a conversation about muscle soreness, one might say, “I’ll pop a couple of painkillers to ease the pain.”

90. SSRI

SSRI (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) are a type of medication used to treat depression and anxiety. In slang terms, they are sometimes called “mood boosters.”

  • For example, someone might say, “I take my mood boosters every morning to help with my depression.”
  • A person discussing their mental health might mention, “My doctor prescribed me mood boosters to help balance my serotonin levels.”
  • In a conversation about managing anxiety, one might say, “Sometimes you just need a little help from mood boosters to get through the tough times.”

91. ACE inhibitor

ACE inhibitors are a type of medication used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. The term “ACE” stands for angiotensin-converting enzyme, which the medication inhibits to relax blood vessels and lower blood pressure.

  • For example, a doctor might prescribe an ACE inhibitor like Lisinopril to a patient with hypertension.
  • In a discussion about managing cardiovascular health, someone might mention, “ACE inhibitors are commonly used to control blood pressure.”
  • A person sharing their medical journey might say, “I’ve been taking ACE inhibitors for years to keep my blood pressure in check.”

92. Opioids

Opioids are a class of drugs that act on the nervous system to relieve pain. They are derived from or chemically similar to substances found in the opium poppy plant. Opioids can be highly addictive and are sometimes misused.

  • For instance, a doctor might prescribe an opioid like oxycodone to manage severe pain after surgery.
  • In a conversation about the opioid crisis, someone might say, “The overprescription of opioids has contributed to the epidemic.”
  • A person sharing their recovery journey might mention, “I struggled with opioid addiction for years before seeking help.”

93. Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids are a type of medication that reduces inflammation in the body. They are commonly used to treat conditions such as asthma, allergies, and autoimmune diseases. Corticosteroids mimic the effects of hormones produced by the adrenal glands.

  • For example, a doctor might prescribe corticosteroids like prednisone to a patient with severe allergies.
  • In a discussion about managing chronic conditions, someone might mention, “Corticosteroids can help control inflammation and reduce symptoms.”
  • A person sharing their experience with an autoimmune disease might say, “I rely on corticosteroids to manage flare-ups and keep my symptoms under control.”

94. Benzodiazepines

Benzodiazepines are a class of drugs used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and certain seizure disorders. They work by enhancing the effects of a neurotransmitter called gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which helps calm the brain and reduce anxiety.

  • For instance, a doctor might prescribe a benzodiazepine like Xanax to a patient with generalized anxiety disorder.
  • In a conversation about mental health, someone might mention, “Benzodiazepines can provide short-term relief for acute anxiety.”
  • A person sharing their journey with panic attacks might say, “I carry a benzodiazepine with me in case I need immediate relief from anxiety.”

95. Stimulants

Stimulants are a class of drugs that increase alertness, attention, and energy. They can be used to treat conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. Stimulants work by increasing the levels of certain chemicals in the brain, such as dopamine and norepinephrine.

  • For example, a doctor might prescribe a stimulant like Adderall to a patient with ADHD.
  • In a discussion about cognitive enhancement, someone might mention, “Stimulants can improve focus and concentration.”
  • A person sharing their experience with narcolepsy might say, “Stimulants help me stay awake and function throughout the day.”

96. Muscle relaxants

Muscle relaxants are medications that help relieve muscle pain, spasms, and stiffness. They work by relaxing the muscles and reducing tension. “Chill pills” is a slang term used to refer to muscle relaxants, highlighting their ability to help the body relax.

  • For example, someone might say, “I pulled a muscle at the gym, I need some chill pills.”
  • In a conversation about managing back pain, a person might mention, “My doctor prescribed some muscle relaxants to help me sleep.”
  • A person experiencing muscle spasms might say, “I’m taking these chill pills to help ease the tension in my muscles.”

97. Topicals

Topicals are medications that are applied directly to the skin to treat various conditions, such as pain, inflammation, or skin disorders. They come in the form of creams, ointments, gels, or lotions. “Creams and ointments” is a more formal term used to describe topicals.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a rash, I need some creams and ointments to soothe it.”
  • In a discussion about skincare, a person might mention, “I use topicals to treat my acne.”
  • A person with arthritis might say, “I apply creams and ointments to my joints to reduce pain and inflammation.”
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