Top 45 Slang For Hate – Meaning & Usage

Hate is a strong and complex emotion that can be difficult to express. But, as language evolves, new slang terms emerge to capture the nuances of this intense feeling. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for hate that will give you a fresh perspective on expressing your frustrations. From subtle digs to full-blown rants, this compilation will equip you with the words to vent your dislike in a way that’s both creative and cathartic. Get ready to explore the colorful world of hate slang!

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1. You Make Me Sick

This phrase is used to express extreme dislike or disgust towards someone.

  • For example, “Every time I see him, You make me sick!”
  • A person might say, “Your actions make me sick. I can’t stand to be around you.”
  • Another might express their feelings by saying, “The way you treat others makes me sick to my stomach.”

2. I Hate Your Guts

This phrase is a strong expression of hatred towards someone.

  • For instance, “I hate your guts! You’re a terrible person.”
  • During an argument, one person might say to another, “I hate your guts and everything you stand for.”
  • A person might express their hatred by saying, “I hate your guts so much that I can’t even look at you.”

3. I Loathe You

This phrase is used to express intense hatred or disgust towards someone.

  • For example, “I loathe you with every fiber of my being.”
  • During a heated argument, one person might say to another, “I loathe you and everything you represent.”
  • A person might express their loathing by saying, “I loathe you so much that I can’t even stand to be in the same room as you.”

4. I Wish You Would Die

This phrase conveys a strong desire for someone’s death due to extreme hatred.

  • For instance, “I wish you would die so that the world would be a better place.”
  • During a heated argument, one person might say to another, “I wish you would die a slow and painful death.”
  • A person might express their intense hatred by saying, “I wish you would die and never come back.”

5. I Can’t Stand the Sight of You

This phrase expresses a strong dislike or aversion towards someone and implies that their mere presence is unbearable.

  • For example, “I can’t stand the sight of you. You make me sick.”
  • During an argument, one person might say to another, “I can’t stand the sight of you. You’re a horrible person.”
  • A person might express their strong aversion by saying, “I can’t stand the sight of you. Just being around you makes me feel disgusted.”

6. Salty

This term is used to describe someone who is bitter, resentful, or upset about something.

  • For example, “He’s always salty when he loses a game.”
  • Someone might say, “Don’t be so salty about not getting invited to the party.”
  • Another might comment, “She’s still salty about that argument from last week.”

7. Left on read

This phrase is used to describe when someone reads a message but does not respond to it.

  • For instance, “I hate it when I get left on read.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe she left me on read after I asked her out.”
  • Another might complain, “He’s always leaving me on read and it’s so frustrating.”

8. Invidiousness

This word refers to the act of behaving in a malicious or resentful manner towards someone.

  • For example, “Her invidiousness towards her coworker was evident in her actions.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand his invidiousness towards me.”
  • Another might comment, “The invidiousness between them is causing tension in the office.”

9. Grudge

A grudge is a deep-seated feeling of anger or resentment towards someone, often resulting from a past offense.

  • For instance, “He’s been holding a grudge against his friend for years.”
  • Someone might say, “I can’t forgive her for what she did, I still hold a grudge.”
  • Another might comment, “They have a long-standing grudge that they can’t seem to let go of.”

10. Aversion

Aversion refers to a strong dislike or distaste for something or someone.

  • For example, “I have an aversion to spiders, they terrify me.”
  • A person might say, “I have a strong aversion to seafood.”
  • Another might comment, “His aversion to public speaking is evident in his nervousness.”

11. Bile

Bile is a metaphorical term used to describe intense anger or resentment towards someone or something. It often implies a deep-seated hatred or disgust.

  • For example, “Her words were filled with bile as she insulted her ex-boyfriend.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t stand the bile that comes out of his mouth.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might exclaim, “I’ve had enough of your bile!”

12. Rancor

Rancor refers to a deep-seated bitterness or spite towards someone or something. It implies a long-lasting and intense hatred or resentment.

  • For instance, “Their divorce was filled with rancor and animosity.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t let go of the rancor I feel towards my former boss.”
  • In a discussion about a long-standing feud, someone might comment, “The rancor between those two families is legendary.”

13. Virulence

Virulence refers to an intense hostility or hatred towards someone or something. It implies a strong desire to harm or destroy.

  • For example, “The virulence of his words shocked everyone in the room.”
  • A person might say, “The virulence of their actions is a reflection of their deep-seated hatred.”
  • In a heated debate, someone might accuse their opponent of “spewing virulence.”

14. Vitriol

Vitriol is a term used to describe bitter criticism or invective towards someone or something. It implies a harsh and corrosive language that is meant to attack or belittle.

  • For instance, “Her vitriol towards her political opponents was evident in her speeches.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe the vitriol that comes out of his mouth.”
  • In a heated online argument, someone might respond with vitriol, saying, “Your ignorance is astounding!”

15. Horror

Horror refers to an intense disgust or revulsion towards someone or something. It implies a strong aversion or repulsion.

  • For example, “The horror in her eyes was evident as she witnessed the accident.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t bear the horror of that crime scene.”
  • In a discussion about a disturbing movie, someone might comment, “The horror depicted in that film was unsettling.”

16. Venom

This word refers to strong feelings of hatred or malice towards someone or something. It can also be used to describe the expression of these negative emotions.

  • For example, “She spewed venom at her ex-boyfriend during their argument.”
  • In a heated debate, one might say, “I can’t believe the venom coming out of your mouth.”
  • A person discussing a toxic relationship might say, “His words were filled with venom, tearing me down emotionally.”

17. Despitefulness

This word describes the act of intentionally causing harm or showing ill will towards someone or something. It implies a deliberate intention to hurt or offend.

  • For instance, “His despitefulness towards his coworkers made the work environment toxic.”
  • In a discussion about bullying, one might say, “Despitefulness can have long-lasting effects on the victim.”
  • A person describing a vindictive act might say, “Her despitefulness was evident in the way she sabotaged his chances.”

18. Pique

Pique refers to a feeling of annoyance or resentment, often caused by a perceived slight or offense. It can also describe a sudden interest or curiosity sparked by something.

  • For example, “Her comment about my appearance piqued my anger.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, one might say, “Small actions can pique feelings of jealousy.”
  • A person describing a sudden interest might say, “His success piqued my curiosity, and I started researching his field.”

19. Jaundice

Jaundice is a term used to describe a prejudiced or biased view towards someone or something. It implies a negative judgment based on preconceived notions or stereotypes.

  • For instance, “His jaundice towards people of a different race was evident in his discriminatory remarks.”
  • In a discussion about discrimination, one might say, “Jaundice can prevent us from seeing the true worth of individuals.”
  • A person describing a biased opinion might say, “Her jaundice towards the new employee affected her ability to judge their performance fairly.”

20. Cattiness

Cattiness refers to the act of engaging in petty and malicious gossip or behavior, often driven by envy or resentment. It implies a mean-spirited and spiteful attitude.

  • For example, “The cattiness among the group of friends led to the breakdown of their relationships.”
  • In a discussion about workplace dynamics, one might say, “Cattiness can create a toxic work environment.”
  • A person describing a malicious comment might say, “Her cattiness was evident in the way she spread rumors about her coworkers.”

21. Spleen

This term refers to a strong dislike or resentment towards someone or something. It can be used to express intense hatred or anger.

  • For instance, “I have a spleen for people who are always late.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “I can’t stand her, she just gives me a spleen.”
  • A person expressing their frustration might say, “I spleen this weather, it ruins all my plans.”

22. Animosity

Animosity refers to a strong feeling of hostility or hatred towards someone or something. It often implies a deep-seated dislike that goes beyond mere disagreement.

  • For example, “There is a lot of animosity between the two rival gangs.”
  • In a political debate, someone might say, “I can’t support him, I have too much animosity towards his policies.”
  • A person might express their animosity by saying, “I can’t stand being around her, there’s just so much animosity between us.”

23. Disgust

Disgust is a feeling of strong revulsion or repugnance towards someone or something. It is often accompanied by a physical reaction of nausea or aversion.

  • For instance, “The smell of rotten food disgusts me.”
  • In a discussion about a disturbing movie scene, someone might say, “It was so graphic, it made me feel pure disgust.”
  • A person might express their disgust by saying, “I can’t believe he said that, it just disgusts me.”

24. Abhorrence

Abhorrence refers to an intense feeling of hatred or detestation towards someone or something. It implies a strong moral or ethical objection to the object of abhorrence.

  • For example, “I have an abhorrence for violence.”
  • In a conversation about a controversial figure, someone might say, “I feel nothing but abhorrence for him.”
  • A person might express their abhorrence by saying, “The mistreatment of animals fills me with abhorrence.”

25. Detest

To detest means to have a strong dislike or hatred towards someone or something. It implies a deep-rooted aversion or repugnance.

  • For instance, “I detest people who are dishonest.”
  • In a discussion about a certain food, someone might say, “I absolutely detest mushrooms.”
  • A person might express their detest by saying, “I can’t stand him, I detest everything about him.”

26. Repulsion

Repulsion refers to a strong feeling of disgust or distaste towards something or someone.

  • For example, “I feel a sense of repulsion towards spiders.”
  • Someone might say, “The smell of rotten eggs fills me with repulsion.”
  • In a discussion about a particular food, a person might comment, “I have a deep repulsion towards mushrooms.”

27. Despise

Despise means to have a strong feeling of hatred or extreme dislike towards something or someone.

  • For instance, “I despise people who lie.”
  • In a conversation about a particular politician, someone might say, “I despise their policies.”
  • A person might comment, “I despise the taste of cilantro.”

28. Loathe

Loathe means to have a deep and intense feeling of hatred or disgust towards something or someone.

  • For example, “I loathe waking up early in the morning.”
  • In a discussion about a particular TV show, someone might say, “I absolutely loathe that show.”
  • A person might comment, “I loathe the sound of nails on a chalkboard.”

29. Abhor

Abhor means to feel a strong sense of hatred or disgust towards something or someone.

  • For instance, “I abhor violence.”
  • In a conversation about a particular social issue, someone might say, “I abhor discrimination.”
  • A person might comment, “I abhor the taste of olives.”

30. Disdain

Disdain refers to a strong feeling of contempt or scorn towards something or someone, often accompanied by a sense of superiority.

  • For example, “She looked at him with disdain.”
  • In a discussion about a certain style of music, someone might say, “I have disdain for that genre.”
  • A person might comment, “I disdain people who are constantly late.”

31. Execrate

To feel intense hatred or disgust towards something or someone. “Execrate” is a strong word that conveys a deep sense of loathing or detestation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I execrate the actions of that criminal.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might shout, “I execrate your lies and deceit!”
  • A person expressing their strong disapproval of a political figure might say, “I execrate everything that person stands for.”

32. Abominate

To strongly dislike or hate something or someone. “Abominate” implies a feeling of extreme disgust or repugnance towards the object of hatred.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I abominate the taste of liver.”
  • A person expressing their strong disapproval of a particular ideology might say, “I abominate racism.”
  • In a discussion about horror movies, a person might say, “I abominate films that rely on jump scares.”

33. Deplore

To feel or express strong disapproval or sadness towards something. “Deplore” suggests a feeling of regret or sorrow for the existence or occurrence of something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I deplore the violence happening in our society.”
  • A person expressing their strong disapproval of a government policy might say, “I deplore the decision to cut funding for education.”
  • In a discussion about environmental issues, someone might say, “I deplore the destruction of natural habitats.”

34. Revile

To criticize or speak about someone or something in a highly abusive or contemptuous manner. “Revile” implies a strong expression of hatred or intense dislike.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I revile the actions of that corrupt politician.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might shout, “I revile your selfishness and lack of empathy!”
  • A person expressing their strong disapproval of a public figure might say, “I revile their blatant disregard for the truth.”

35. Repugn

To cause a feeling of intense disgust or aversion. “Repugn” suggests a strong sense of revulsion or repulsion towards something.

  • For example, a person might say, “The smell of rotten eggs repugns me.”
  • A person expressing their strong disapproval of a particular behavior might say, “The act of animal cruelty repugns me.”
  • In a discussion about certain foods, a person might say, “The taste of durian repugns many people.”

36. Scorn

Scorn is a strong feeling of contempt or disgust towards someone or something. It is a way of expressing extreme dislike or disapproval.

  • For example, “She looked at him with scorn, unable to hide her disgust.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “I scorn your pathetic attempts to defend yourself.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as having a “scornful smile” as they belittle someone.
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37. Spurn

Spurn means to reject or refuse someone or something with contempt or disdain. It implies a strong dislike or refusal to accept.

  • For instance, “Despite his advances, she spurned his affections.”
  • A person might say, “I spurn your offer, it is beneath me.”
  • In a story, a character might spurn an invitation to a party, showing their dislike for the host.

38. Contemn

Contemn means to despise or have a strong feeling of dislike or disapproval towards someone or something. It implies a deep sense of disdain or scorn.

  • For example, “He contemns anyone who disagrees with him.”
  • A person might say, “I contemn your actions, they are morally wrong.”
  • In a movie, a character might contemn their rival, showing their intense dislike.

39. Repel

Repel means to feel strong disgust or aversion towards someone or something. It implies a strong desire to avoid or reject.

  • For instance, “The smell of rotten eggs repelled her.”
  • A person might say, “Your behavior repels me, I want nothing to do with you.”
  • In a book, a character might be described as having a “repelling personality” due to their unpleasant nature.

40. Antipathy

Antipathy is a strong feeling of dislike or aversion towards someone or something. It implies a deep-seated hatred or repulsion.

  • For example, “She felt a strong antipathy towards her ex-boyfriend.”
  • A person might say, “I have an antipathy towards dishonesty, it goes against my values.”
  • In a play, two characters might have an antipathy towards each other, leading to conflict.

41. Hostility

Hostility can be seen in verbal or physical aggression towards another person or group.

  • For example, “The two rival gangs showed open hostility towards each other.”
  • In a workplace setting, a coworker might display hostility by constantly criticizing and belittling others.
  • A person might express their hostility towards a particular political party by actively campaigning against them.
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42. Malice

Malice is often associated with ill-will or a desire for revenge.

  • For instance, “He acted with malice when he spread false rumors about his ex-girlfriend.”
  • In a legal context, a prosecutor might argue that a crime was committed with malice aforethought.
  • A person might say, “I can sense the malice in her voice when she talks about her rival.”

43. Odium

Odium is a strong word that denotes extreme dislike or contempt.

  • For example, “He felt nothing but odium towards the person who had betrayed him.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of acting out of pure odium.
  • A person might say, “I have nothing but odium for people who harm innocent animals.”

44. Enmity

Enmity implies a long-standing and bitter animosity towards another person or group.

  • For instance, “The two families have a history of enmity that goes back generations.”
  • In a political context, a politician might accuse their opponent of harboring enmity towards a certain demographic.
  • A person might say, “I have nothing but enmity towards those who seek to oppress others.”

45. Dislike

Dislike is a less intense word compared to the others on this list, indicating a lesser degree of negative feelings.

  • For example, “I dislike the taste of cilantro.”
  • In a social context, a person might say, “I don’t dislike her, but we just don’t get along.”
  • A person might express their dislike for a certain genre of music by saying, “I’m not a fan of heavy metal.”