Top 43 Slang For Slow – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to describing things that are slow, we often find ourselves using the same old words. But fear not, because we have a list of slang terms for slow that will add some flavor to your vocabulary. From “snail’s pace” to “tortoise-like,” we’ve got you covered with the most creative ways to describe things that take their sweet time. So sit back, relax, and get ready to expand your linguistic horizons with this fun and informative article!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Lag

Lag refers to a delay or latency in the performance of a computer or online game. It can cause a slow or unresponsive experience for the user.

  • For example, a gamer might complain, “I keep experiencing lag during this multiplayer match.”
  • In a discussion about internet speeds, someone might say, “High ping can result in lag while streaming videos.”
  • A user might ask for troubleshooting tips with a question like, “How can I reduce lag while playing online games?”

2. Laggard

Laggard is a derogatory term used to describe someone who is slow, lazy, or falls behind in their work or tasks.

  • For instance, a boss might reprimand an employee by saying, “You’re such a laggard. Pick up the pace!”
  • In a group project, a team member might complain, “We can’t finish on time because of our laggard teammate.”
  • A teacher might use the term to describe a student who consistently fails to complete assignments, saying, “Johnny is a laggard when it comes to turning in his homework.”

3. Poky

Poky is an informal term used to describe something or someone that is slow, sluggish, or lacking in speed.

  • For example, in a crowded city, someone might say, “This traffic is so poky. We’re barely moving.”
  • A person waiting in a slow-moving line might comment, “This line is really poky. I hope it speeds up soon.”
  • A friend might tease another by saying, “Come on, stop being so poky. We’re going to be late!”

4. Slowcoach

Slowcoach is a playful term used to describe someone who is slow, especially in their movements or decision-making.

  • For instance, a friend might joke, “Hurry up, slowcoach! We’re going to miss the movie.”
  • In a race, someone might taunt a slower competitor by saying, “You’re such a slowcoach, I’ll beat you easily.”
  • A parent might affectionately call their child a slowcoach when they take a long time to get ready in the morning.

5. Slow burn

Slow burn refers to a situation or process that develops or intensifies gradually over time, rather than happening suddenly or explosively.

  • For example, a relationship might be described as a slow burn, with feelings gradually growing stronger.
  • In a movie review, a critic might say, “The film starts as a slow burn, building tension until the explosive climax.”
  • A person might describe their career progression as a slow burn, saying, “I’ve been steadily climbing the corporate ladder, but it’s been a slow burn.”

6. Slack

This term refers to someone who is slow, lazy, or lacking in motivation. It can also refer to a lack of effort or productivity.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “You need to pick up the pace. Stop being so slack.”
  • A coworker might complain, “I can’t stand working with him. He’s always so slack.”
  • In a group project, someone might say, “We can’t afford any slack. Let’s all pull our weight.”

7. Drag your feet

This phrase means to procrastinate or take longer than necessary to complete a task. It can also refer to being slow or hesitant in making a decision.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Stop dragging your feet and turn in your assignment.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “We need to leave soon. Stop dragging your feet and get ready.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might say, “We can’t afford to drag our feet on this project. Let’s move forward.”

8. Crawling

This term describes something or someone that is moving very slowly. It can also imply a lack of progress or forward momentum.

  • For example, a driver stuck in traffic might say, “We’re crawling along at a snail’s pace.”
  • A person waiting in a long line might complain, “The line is moving so slowly. It’s crawling.”
  • In a discussion about a slow computer, someone might say, “My computer is crawling. It’s taking forever to load.”

9. Lingeringly

This word describes someone or something that is moving slowly or taking longer than necessary. It can also suggest a sense of reluctance or delay.

  • For instance, a parent might say to their child, “Stop lingeringly and finish your chores.”
  • A friend might urge another, “We’re going to be late. Quit lingeringly and let’s go.”
  • In a work context, a supervisor might say, “We can’t afford any lingeringly. We need to meet our deadlines.”

10. Sleepy head

This term refers to someone who is slow, lethargic, or lacking energy. It can also describe a feeling of drowsiness or tiredness.

  • For example, a parent might call their child a sleepy head if they’re having trouble waking up in the morning.
  • A coworker might say, “I’m feeling so sluggish today. I didn’t get enough sleep.”
  • In a fitness context, someone might say, “I need to get moving and shake off this sleepy head feeling.”

11. Snail’s pace

This phrase refers to a speed that is as slow as a snail crawling. It is often used to describe something that is progressing at an extremely slow rate.

  • For example, “The construction project is moving at a snail’s pace.”
  • In a race, someone might say, “He’s running at a snail’s pace, he’ll never catch up.”
  • When talking about a slow internet connection, one might complain, “The download speed is at a snail’s pace.”

12. Slug

To “slug” means to move in a slow and lazy manner. It can also be used to describe someone who is slow or lazy in their actions.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling so tired, I just want to slug around all day.”
  • When describing a person’s work ethic, one might say, “He’s such a slug, always taking his time to complete tasks.”
  • If someone is walking slowly, you might say, “Come on, stop slugging and pick up the pace!”

13. Turtle

To “turtle” means to move or progress at a slow pace. It is often used to describe someone who is taking their time or being cautious.

  • For example, “She’s turtling her way through the obstacle course.”
  • When describing a slow driver, one might say, “He’s turtling along the highway, holding up traffic.”
  • If someone is working slowly on a project, you might ask, “Why are you turtling? We need to finish this soon!”

14. Sloth-like

This term describes someone or something that moves or acts in a manner similar to a sloth, which is known for its slow and leisurely movements.

  • For instance, “After a long day at work, I feel so sloth-like, just wanting to relax.”
  • When describing a person’s productivity, one might say, “He’s been acting sloth-like, barely getting any work done.”
  • If someone is walking slowly, you might comment, “Your pace is sloth-like, we’re going to be late!”

15. Lethargic

To be “lethargic” means to lack energy, motivation, or enthusiasm. It can also describe a slow and sluggish physical state.

  • For example, “I’ve been feeling so lethargic lately, it’s hard to get anything done.”
  • When describing someone’s response time, one might say, “He’s been quite lethargic in replying to messages.”
  • If someone is moving slowly, you might ask, “Are you feeling lethargic today? You’re barely moving!”

16. Molasses

This term refers to something or someone that moves very slowly, similar to the slow movement of molasses. It can be used to describe a person’s physical movement or the pace of a project or task.

  • For example, “She’s as slow as molasses in January when it comes to getting ready.”
  • In a conversation about a slow computer, someone might say, “My laptop is running as slow as molasses.”
  • Another example could be, “The construction work is progressing at a molasses-like pace.”

17. Crawl

To crawl means to move forward very slowly, often on hands and knees or with the body close to the ground. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a slow rate of progress or development.

  • For instance, “The traffic was crawling during rush hour.”
  • In a discussion about a slow internet connection, someone might say, “The webpage is loading at a crawl.”
  • Another example could be, “The project is crawling along; we need to pick up the pace.”

18. Dilly-dally

This term means to waste time or procrastinate, often by engaging in unimportant or frivolous activities instead of getting things done. It implies a lack of urgency or efficiency.

  • For example, “Stop dilly-dallying and start working on your assignment.”
  • In a conversation about someone taking too long to make a decision, one might say, “Quit dilly-dallying and just choose already.”
  • Another example could be, “We can’t afford to dilly-dally; we need to finish this project on time.”

19. Plodding

Plodding refers to a slow and steady manner of movement, often lacking enthusiasm or energy. It can also describe a slow and monotonous progress or development.

  • For instance, “He walked in a plodding manner, taking slow and deliberate steps.”
  • In a discussion about a slow-moving plot in a book, someone might say, “The story was plodding along with no exciting twists.”
  • Another example could be, “The project is plodding forward, but we need to inject some energy into it.”

20. Lagging

Lagging means to fall behind or fail to keep up with others, often in terms of progress, speed, or performance. It can also refer to a delay or slow response in technology or communication.

  • For example, “She’s lagging behind the rest of the class in math.”
  • In a conversation about a slow internet connection, someone might say, “My video keeps lagging; I can’t watch it smoothly.”
  • Another example could be, “The company is lagging in terms of innovation compared to its competitors.”

21. Creeping

“I was stuck behind a car that was creeping along the highway.”

  • “The line at the grocery store was creeping,“The line at the grocery store was creeping, so I decided to switch to a different checkout.”
  • “He was creeping around the party,“He was creeping around the party, trying to avoid attention.”

22. Saunter

“She sauntered into the room, taking her time.”

  • “He sauntered down the street,“He sauntered down the street, enjoying the sunny weather.”
  • “They sauntered through the park,“They sauntered through the park, taking in the sights.”

23. Dawdling

“Stop dawdling and get ready, we’re going to be late!”

  • “The kids were dawdling on their way to school,“The kids were dawdling on their way to school, causing them to miss the bus.”
  • “She spent the afternoon dawdling around the house,“She spent the afternoon dawdling around the house, not getting anything done.”

24. Dragging one’s feet

“He’s been dragging his feet on finishing the project.”

  • “She’s been dragging her feet about making a decision.”
  • “The team has been dragging their feet on implementing the new policy.”
See also  Top 36 Slang For Finding – Meaning & Usage

25. Tardy

“He’s always tardy to our meetings.”

  • “She was tardy to class again this morning.”
  • “The train was tardy,“The train was tardy, causing me to miss my appointment.”

26. Strolling

Strolling refers to walking at a relaxed and unhurried pace. It often implies a sense of enjoyment or leisure.

  • For example, “We spent the afternoon strolling through the park.”
  • A person might say, “I love strolling along the beach and listening to the waves.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, someone might mention, “I prefer strolling to jogging because it’s less strenuous.”

27. Cautious

Cautious describes someone who is careful, hesitant, or hesitant. It often implies a sense of being mindful or taking precautions.

  • For instance, “He walked cautiously across the icy sidewalk.”
  • A person might say, “I’m always cautious when trying new activities to avoid injuries.”
  • In a discussion about personal safety, someone might advise, “It’s important to be cautious when walking alone at night.”

28. Trudging

Trudging refers to walking slowly and with effort, often due to fatigue or a heavy load. It can also imply a sense of reluctance or weariness.

  • For example, “She trudged through the snow, her feet sinking with each step.”
  • A person might say, “I trudged up the steep hill, taking breaks along the way.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult task, someone might mention, “I feel like I’m trudging through this project.”

29. Meandering

Meandering describes a slow and indirect movement, often without a clear purpose or destination. It can also refer to a winding or curving path.

  • For instance, “We spent the afternoon meandering through the streets of the old town.”
  • A person might say, “I enjoy meandering through the forest, exploring different trails.”
  • In a discussion about a road trip, someone might mention, “We took the scenic route, meandering through small towns and countryside.”

30. Lollygag

Lollygag refers to wasting time or lingering in a leisurely manner. It often implies a sense of laziness or lack of urgency.

  • For example, “Stop lollygagging and get back to work!”
  • A person might say, “I spent the day lollygagging at the beach, enjoying the sunshine.”
  • In a conversation about productivity, someone might mention, “I tend to lollygag in the mornings and get more work done in the afternoon.”

31. Snaillike

This term refers to something or someone that moves at a very slow pace, similar to how a snail crawls. It is often used to describe slow progress or movement.

  • For example, “The traffic was snaillike during rush hour.”
  • In a conversation about a slow computer, someone might say, “My computer is running snaillike.”
  • A person describing a slow learner might say, “He’s been making snaillike progress in his studies.”

32. Drip-feed

This slang term is often used to describe the act of giving or receiving information, resources, or updates in a slow and gradual manner.

  • For instance, “The company decided to drip-feed the new product features to create anticipation.”
  • In a discussion about a TV show, someone might say, “I hate how they drip-feed episodes instead of releasing the whole season at once.”
  • A person might complain, “My boss always drip-feeds me tasks throughout the day instead of giving them all at once.”

33. Dally

This term is used to describe the act of taking too long to do something or spending time in a leisurely or aimless manner.

  • For example, “Stop dallying and finish your homework.”
  • In a conversation about a slow worker, someone might say, “He’s always dallying and never finishes his tasks on time.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t stand it when people dally instead of making a decision.”

34. Turtle speed

This slang term compares the speed of something or someone to that of a turtle, which is known for its slow movement.

  • For instance, “The internet connection is running at turtle speed.”
  • In a discussion about a slow car, someone might say, “That old clunker moves at turtle speed.”
  • A person might comment, “I can’t believe how turtle speed this line is moving.”

35. Dilly-dallying

This term is used to describe the act of wasting time or delaying in a purposeless or indecisive manner.

  • For example, “Stop dilly-dallying and make a decision.”
  • In a conversation about someone who takes a long time to get ready, someone might say, “She’s always dilly-dallying and making us late.”
  • A person might complain, “I hate it when people keep dilly-dallying instead of getting to the point.”

36. Sauntering

This term refers to walking in a slow, relaxed manner, often with a casual or confident attitude.

  • For example, “She sauntered down the street, enjoying the sunshine.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll just saunter over to the store and grab some snacks.”
  • In a description of someone’s movement, one might write, “He sauntered into the room, drawing everyone’s attention.”

37. Crawling at a snail’s pace

This phrase emphasizes the slowness of someone’s movement, comparing it to the slow pace at which a snail moves.

  • For instance, “The traffic was crawling at a snail’s pace during rush hour.”
  • A person might complain, “I can’t believe this project is moving at a snail’s pace.”
  • In a description of a slow-moving line, one might say, “We stood in line, crawling at a snail’s pace.”

38. Taking one’s sweet time

This phrase implies that someone is not in a rush and is moving at their own leisurely pace.

  • For example, “She took her sweet time getting ready for the party.”
  • A person might say, “No need to rush, I’m just taking my sweet time.”
  • In a description of someone’s work habits, one might write, “He always takes his sweet time to ensure everything is done perfectly.”

39. Inch by inch

This phrase suggests that progress is being made very slowly, often implying a tedious or laborious process.

  • For instance, “They are moving forward inch by inch in their research.”
  • A person might say, “The project is taking forever, but we’re getting there inch by inch.”
  • In a description of a slow-moving vehicle, one might write, “The truck crept forward inch by inch.”

40. Moving like molasses in January

This phrase emphasizes the slow speed of movement, comparing it to the slow flow of molasses in the cold month of January.

  • For example, “The old man was walking like molasses in January.”
  • A person might complain, “The line at the DMV was moving like molasses in January.”
  • In a description of a slow-moving animal, one might say, “The turtle crossed the road like molasses in January.”

41. Laggy

This term is often used to describe a device or system that is slow to respond or perform tasks. It can refer to anything from a slow internet connection to a sluggish video game.

  • For example, a gamer might complain, “This game is so laggy, I can’t even move my character.”
  • Someone might say, “My computer is acting so laggy today, it’s taking forever to load anything.”
  • A person frustrated with their phone might comment, “The laggy performance of this device is driving me crazy.”

42. Slowing to a crawl

This phrase is used to describe a situation or process that is gradually becoming slower and slower, to the point of being nearly non-existent or unproductive.

  • For instance, in a traffic jam, a driver might say, “The traffic is slowing to a crawl, we’re barely moving.”
  • In a discussion about a slow computer, someone might say, “My laptop is slowing to a crawl, it’s taking forever to open any programs.”
  • A person describing a tedious task might say, “The paperwork is slowing to a crawl, it’s taking me hours to get through it.”

43. Pokey

This term is used to describe something or someone that is moving or operating at a slow pace.

  • For example, a person waiting for their friend might say, “Come on, don’t be so pokey, we’re going to be late.”
  • In a conversation about a slow internet connection, someone might say, “My internet is so pokey, it’s frustrating to browse the web.”
  • A person describing a slow-moving turtle might comment, “Look at that pokey little guy, taking his time to cross the road.”