Top 25 Slang For Hatred – Meaning & Usage

Hate is a strong emotion that can be expressed in various ways, including through slang terms that have emerged in modern language. Whether you’re venting frustrations or simply curious about the language of animosity, our team has compiled a list of the top slang for hatred that will shed light on this dark but intriguing aspect of human communication. Dive in and explore the colorful expressions that capture the intensity of dislike and resentment in our everyday conversations.

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1. Loathe

To have an intense aversion or hatred towards someone or something.

  • For example, “I absolutely loathe broccoli.”
  • A person might say, “I loathe having to wake up early for work.”
  • One might express their feelings by saying, “I loathe people who are always late.”

2. Despise

To have a strong feeling of hatred or disgust towards someone or something.

  • For instance, “I despise people who are rude.”
  • A person might say, “I despise the taste of cilantro.”
  • One might express their feelings by saying, “I despise politicians who lie.”

3. Abhor

To regard with extreme repugnance or disgust; to hate intensely.

  • For example, “I abhor animal cruelty.”
  • A person might say, “I abhor people who cheat.”
  • One might express their feelings by saying, “I abhor the smell of cigarette smoke.”

4. Detest

To have a strong feeling of dislike or aversion towards someone or something.

  • For instance, “I detest spiders.”
  • A person might say, “I detest people who gossip.”
  • One might express their feelings by saying, “I detest the taste of olives.”

5. Disdain

To have a feeling of contempt or scorn towards someone or something; to consider someone or something unworthy or beneath consideration.

  • For example, “She looked at him with disdain.”
  • A person might say, “I disdain people who are dishonest.”
  • One might express their feelings by saying, “I disdain reality TV shows.”

6. Repugnance

Repugnance refers to a strong feeling of disgust or extreme dislike towards someone or something.

  • For example, “I feel a sense of repugnance towards people who harm animals.”
  • In a heated argument, one person might say, “Your actions fill me with repugnance.”
  • A character in a book might describe a villain as having “an aura of repugnance.”

7. Animosity

Animosity refers to a strong feeling of hostility or hatred towards someone or something.

  • For instance, “There is a deep-rooted animosity between the two rival gangs.”
  • In a political debate, one person might accuse the other of “spreading animosity and division.”
  • A character in a movie might say, “I can sense the animosity between them every time they’re in the same room.”

8. Antipathy

Antipathy refers to a strong feeling of dislike or aversion towards someone or something.

  • For example, “She has always had an antipathy towards authority figures.”
  • In a discussion about food preferences, someone might say, “I have a strong antipathy towards olives.”
  • A person might express their antipathy towards a particular political party by saying, “I can’t stand their policies.”

9. Malice

Malice refers to the intention or desire to do harm or cause suffering to others.

  • For instance, “The suspect acted with malice when committing the crime.”
  • In a court case, a prosecutor might argue that the defendant acted out of malice rather than accident.
  • A character in a book might be described as having “a heart filled with malice.”
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10. Rancor

Rancor refers to bitter resentment or long-lasting hatred towards someone or something.

  • For example, “There is a deep rancor between the two feuding families.”
  • In a conversation about past conflicts, one person might say, “I still feel a sense of rancor towards those who wronged me.”
  • A character in a TV show might hold onto rancor towards their former friend for betraying them.

11. Enmity

Enmity refers to a state of deep-seated hatred or animosity towards someone or something. It implies a long-lasting and intense dislike.

  • For example, “There has always been enmity between the two rival gangs.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The enmity between the two parties is evident in their constant attacks.”
  • A person discussing a personal feud might say, “I have nothing but enmity towards my ex-partner.”

12. Hostility

Hostility refers to a state of open and intense hatred or aggression towards someone or something. It implies a strong aversion and a willingness to act upon that hatred.

  • For instance, “The two countries have a long history of hostility towards each other.”
  • In a workplace setting, one might say, “The hostile environment created by the boss has affected everyone’s morale.”
  • A person discussing a heated argument might say, “The discussion quickly turned into hostility, with insults being thrown around.”

13. Spite

Spite refers to a feeling of malicious hatred or a desire to harm or annoy someone out of pure malice or ill-will.

  • For example, “She acted out of spite and spread rumors about her ex-friend.”
  • In a competitive context, one might say, “He played dirty out of spite and deliberately tried to sabotage his opponent.”
  • A person discussing a vengeful act might say, “He did it out of spite, just to get back at them.”

14. Revulsion

Revulsion refers to a feeling of intense disgust and hatred towards someone or something. It implies a strong aversion and a physical reaction of disgust.

  • For instance, “She felt revulsion towards the sight of blood.”
  • In a moral context, one might say, “His actions filled me with revulsion.”
  • A person discussing a disturbing image might say, “I couldn’t help but feel revulsion when I saw that.”

15. Odium

Odium refers to extreme and widespread hatred and disgust towards someone or something. It implies a strong public disapproval and condemnation.

  • For example, “The dictator’s actions earned him the odium of the international community.”
  • In a social context, one might say, “His racist remarks were met with widespread odium.”
  • A person discussing a despised figure might say, “He is universally regarded with odium for his crimes.”

16. Aversion

A strong feeling of dislike or disgust towards something or someone. Aversion is often used to describe a deep-seated dislike that goes beyond a simple disagreement or preference.

  • For example, “I have an aversion to spicy food, so I never order anything with chili peppers.”
  • Someone might say, “I have a strong aversion to snakes. They terrify me.”
  • A person discussing their aversion to public speaking might say, “I get extremely nervous and anxious whenever I have to give a presentation.”

17. Repulsion

A strong feeling of intense dislike or revulsion towards something or someone. Repulsion often implies a physical reaction of disgust or a strong emotional rejection of something.

  • For instance, “The sight of blood makes me feel a deep sense of repulsion.”
  • A person might say, “I feel a sense of repulsion towards people who mistreat animals.”
  • Someone discussing their repulsion towards a certain food might say, “The smell alone is enough to make me feel repulsed.”

18. Contempt

A feeling of strong disrespect or scorn towards someone or something. Contempt often implies a lack of respect or a belief that the person or thing is beneath consideration or unworthy.

  • For example, “He looked at me with contempt, as if I was beneath him.”
  • A person might say, “I have nothing but contempt for politicians who lie to the public.”
  • Someone discussing their contempt for a certain company might say, “Their unethical practices have earned my contempt.”

19. Grudge

A persistent feeling of anger or resentment towards someone or something, often resulting from a past offense or perceived injustice. A grudge is a deep-seated, long-lasting form of hatred or animosity.

  • For instance, “He has held a grudge against his former business partner for years.”
  • A person might say, “I still hold a grudge against my ex for how they treated me.”
  • Someone discussing their grudge against a certain organization might say, “Their discriminatory policies have fueled my grudge against them.”

20. Bitterness

A strong feeling of anger or resentment, often accompanied by a sense of injustice or unfairness. Bitterness is a deep-seated form of hatred that can result from past experiences or perceived wrongdoings.

  • For example, “She spoke with bitterness about the way she was treated by her former employer.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t help but feel bitterness towards those who have wronged me.”
  • Someone discussing their bitterness towards a certain group might say, “Their actions have fueled a sense of bitterness within me.”

21. Vengeance

Vengeance refers to the act of seeking revenge or retaliation against someone who has wronged you. It is a strong feeling of anger and hatred that drives a person to seek retribution.

  • For example, “He sought vengeance against his enemy by plotting a series of elaborate schemes.”
  • In a discussion about justice, someone might say, “Vengeance is not the same as justice; it’s driven by personal emotions.”
  • A character in a book might declare, “I will have my vengeance, no matter the cost!”

22. Vehemence

Vehemence describes the intensity and passion with which someone expresses their feelings, often including anger or hatred. It refers to the forcefulness and power behind someone’s words or actions.

  • For instance, “He argued his point with such vehemence that it left everyone in the room stunned.”
  • In a debate, one might say, “She spoke with great vehemence, making it clear where she stood on the issue.”
  • A reviewer might write, “The actor delivered a performance full of vehemence, capturing the character’s anger and frustration.”

23. Disgust

Disgust is a strong feeling of revulsion and aversion towards something or someone. It is a form of intense dislike and can be fueled by hatred or contempt.

  • For example, “The sight of blood makes me feel disgust.”
  • In a discussion about personal preferences, someone might say, “I have a deep disgust for olives; I can’t stand the taste.”
  • A character in a movie might express disgust by saying, “I can’t believe you would do something so disgusting!”

24. Acrimony

Acrimony refers to strong feelings of bitterness, resentment, and hostility towards someone. It often involves a deep-seated hatred or animosity that can manifest in arguments, conflicts, or strained relationships.

  • For instance, “Their divorce was filled with acrimony, with each party fighting for their own interests.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “There is so much acrimony between the two parties; it’s hard to find common ground.”
  • A character in a play might express acrimony by saying, “I will never forgive you for what you’ve done!”

25. Scorn

Scorn refers to a feeling of contempt or disdain towards someone or something. It is a strong form of hatred or dislike that is often accompanied by a sense of superiority or judgment.

  • For example, “She looked at him with scorn, unable to hide her disgust.”
  • In a discussion about social hierarchies, one might say, “Those in power often treat those beneath them with scorn.”
  • A character in a novel might express scorn by saying, “I have nothing but scorn for those who betray their friends.”