Top 48 Slang For Convert – Meaning & Usage

Are you ready to dive into the world of slang for convert? Whether you’re a newbie to the lingo or a seasoned pro, our team has got you covered with a curated list of the trendiest and most essential terms in this realm. Get ready to level up your language game and stay ahead of the curve with our comprehensive guide. Let’s break down the barriers and decode the language of the converts together!

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1. Flip

To “flip” means to change sides or beliefs, often abruptly or unexpectedly. This term is commonly used to describe someone who switches their allegiance or opinion.

  • For example, “He used to be a hardcore Apple fan, but he recently flipped and became a PC user.”
  • In a political context, one might say, “The senator flipped on his stance on gun control.”
  • A person discussing their diet might say, “I flipped from being a meat eater to a vegetarian.”

2. Switch

To “switch” means to change or exchange something. It can refer to changing one’s beliefs, preferences, or actions.

  • For instance, “She used to be a night owl, but she switched and became a morning person.”
  • In a conversation about jobs, one might say, “I switched careers and became a teacher.”
  • A person discussing their phone might say, “I’m thinking about switching from iPhone to Android.”

3. Transform

To “transform” means to change completely in form, appearance, or nature. This term often implies a significant and noticeable change.

  • For example, “Her fitness journey transformed her body and mindset.”
  • In a discussion about technology, one might say, “The invention of smartphones transformed the way we communicate.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Traveling has transformed my perspective on life.”

4. Turn

To “turn” can mean to convert or change direction. It can refer to changing one’s beliefs, actions, or lifestyle.

  • For instance, “He turned to Buddhism after exploring various spiritual practices.”
  • In a conversation about career paths, one might say, “I turned my passion for photography into a full-time job.”
  • A person discussing their exercise routine might say, “I turned to yoga for its physical and mental benefits.”

5. Shift

To “shift” means to move or change position, often in a subtle or gradual manner. It can refer to changing one’s mindset, focus, or approach.

  • For example, “She shifted her attention from material possessions to experiences.”
  • In a discussion about environmental awareness, one might say, “We need to shift our habits towards sustainability.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’m considering shifting gears and pursuing a different industry.”

6. Alter

To make a modification or adjustment to something. In the context of conversion, it refers to making changes to a person’s beliefs or opinions.

  • For example, “I altered my political views after reading that book.”
  • In a religious context, one might say, “He altered his faith and converted to Buddhism.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’m constantly altering my perspectives as I learn and evolve.”

7. Modify

To make changes or adjustments to something in order to improve it or make it more suitable. When used in the context of conversion, it refers to making changes to a person’s beliefs or behavior.

  • For instance, “I modified my diet to include more plant-based foods.”
  • In a religious context, one might say, “She modified her lifestyle to align with the teachings of her new faith.”
  • A person discussing self-improvement might say, “I’m constantly modifying my habits to become a better version of myself.”

8. Transmute

To change or alter something completely, often into a different form or state. When used in the context of conversion, it refers to a significant and profound change in beliefs or identity.

  • For example, “The experience transmuted her from an atheist to a devout believer.”
  • In a spiritual context, one might say, “Meditation has the power to transmute negative energy into positive.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’ve transmuted my fear of failure into motivation to succeed.”

9. Metamorphose

To undergo a complete and dramatic change in form, structure, or substance. In the context of conversion, it refers to a profound transformation in beliefs or identity.

  • For instance, “She metamorphosed from a shy introvert to a confident public speaker.”
  • In a religious context, one might say, “The ceremony symbolizes the metamorphosis of the individual’s soul.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “I’ve undergone a metamorphosis of my mindset and outlook on life.”

10. Transfigure

To change or transform the outward appearance or form of something. When used in the context of conversion, it refers to a visible change in a person’s beliefs or behavior.

  • For example, “His newfound passion for environmentalism transfigured his lifestyle.”
  • In a religious context, one might say, “The divine presence transfigures the individual’s physical appearance.”
  • A person discussing personal growth might say, “Yoga has transfigured my body and mind.”

11. Transpose

To rearrange or change the order or position of something. “Transpose” is often used in the context of converting or transforming data from one format or structure to another.

  • For example, in music, a musician might say, “Let’s transpose this song to a higher key.”
  • In programming, someone might ask, “How do I transpose a matrix in Python?”
  • A data analyst might explain, “I need to transpose this table to make it easier to analyze.”

12. Transubstantiate

To change or convert something into a completely different form or substance. “Transubstantiate” is often used in a figurative or metaphorical sense, referring to a profound transformation or conversion.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Traveling can transubstantiate your perspective on life.”
  • In a spiritual or religious context, someone might discuss the transubstantiation of bread and wine into the body and blood of Christ.
  • A writer might describe a character’s growth by saying, “Throughout the novel, the protagonist transubstantiates from a naive teenager into a wise leader.”

13. Reconfigure

To change the configuration or arrangement of something, often with the purpose of adapting or optimizing it for a different use or purpose. “Reconfigure” is commonly used in the context of technology, systems, or settings.

  • For example, in computer networking, someone might say, “We need to reconfigure the router to improve the network speed.”
  • In interior design, a decorator might suggest, “Let’s reconfigure the furniture layout to create a more open space.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I decided to reconfigure my professional path and pursue a different industry.”

14. Reformat

To convert or change the format or structure of something, often with the intention of making it compatible with a different system or device.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to reformat this USB drive to use it on my Mac.”
  • In computer programming, someone might ask, “How do I reformat the date to MM/DD/YYYY format?”
  • A photographer might explain, “I had to reformat the memory card to clear all the previous photos.”

15. Reconstitute

To reform or reconstruct something, often by bringing together separate components or elements. “Reconstitute” is commonly used in the context of food or substances that can be rehydrated or restored to their original state.

  • For example, in cooking, someone might say, “Add water to reconstitute the dried mushrooms.”
  • In chemistry, a scientist might discuss how to reconstitute a powdered substance by adding a solvent.
  • A person describing a team might say, “After some members left, we had to reconstitute the group with new recruits.”

16. Reorganize

To reorganize means to rearrange or restructure something, usually for the purpose of improving efficiency or effectiveness. It involves changing the way things are organized or structured.

  • For example, in a work setting, a manager might say, “We need to reorganize the department to streamline our processes.”
  • A person discussing their personal life might say, “I’m going to reorganize my schedule to make more time for hobbies.”
  • In a home setting, someone might say, “I’m going to reorganize my closet to make it more functional.”

17. Reorient

To reorient means to change the direction or focus of something. It involves shifting or adjusting the way something is oriented or directed.

  • For instance, in a business context, a company might say, “We need to reorient our marketing strategy to target a different demographic.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’m looking to reorient my career towards a more fulfilling path.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I need to reorient my mindset to focus on gratitude.”

18. Recondition

To recondition means to restore or refurbish something to a better or improved condition. It involves repairing, cleaning, or otherwise improving the state of an item or system.

  • For example, when talking about a car, someone might say, “I’m going to recondition the engine to improve its performance.”
  • A person discussing their health might say, “I’m going to recondition my body by starting a new exercise routine.”
  • In a home context, someone might say, “I’m going to recondition this old furniture to give it a fresh look.”

19. Rebuild

To rebuild means to construct or create something again, often after it has been damaged or destroyed. It involves starting from scratch and building something back up.

  • For instance, when talking about a city, someone might say, “After the earthquake, the city had to rebuild its infrastructure.”
  • A person discussing a relationship might say, “We’re working to rebuild trust after a betrayal.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’m going to rebuild my life after a major setback.”

20. Recreate

To recreate means to make or create something again, often with the intention of replicating or experiencing a previous version or state. It involves bringing something back into existence or reimagining it.

  • For example, when talking about a painting, someone might say, “The artist recreated the masterpiece using the same techniques.”
  • A person discussing a vacation might say, “I want to recreate the magical experience of my last trip.”
  • In a personal context, someone might say, “I’m going to recreate the feeling of joy I had as a child.”

21. Renew

To renew means to refresh or restore something. It can also refer to starting again or extending the validity of something.

  • For example, “I need to renew my driver’s license before it expires.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to renew my gym membership for another year.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “Sometimes, couples need to renew their commitment to each other.”

22. Rejuvenate

To rejuvenate means to make someone or something feel young, fresh, or energetic again. It can also refer to restoring or improving the condition of something.

  • For instance, “I need a vacation to rejuvenate myself.”
  • A person might say, “A good night’s sleep can rejuvenate your body and mind.”
  • In a discussion about skincare, someone might recommend, “Use this cream to rejuvenate your skin and reduce signs of aging.”

23. Regenerate

To regenerate means to restore or revive something, especially after it has been damaged or destroyed. It can also refer to the process of growing or developing something new.

  • For example, “The doctor said my liver has the ability to regenerate.”
  • A person might say, “Spending time in nature can help regenerate your energy.”
  • In a discussion about environmental conservation, someone might say, “We need to take action now to regenerate the planet.”

24. Rebirth

Rebirth refers to the process of being born again or starting anew. It can also refer to a significant change or transformation in someone’s life.

  • For instance, “The caterpillar undergoes a rebirth and emerges as a butterfly.”
  • A person might say, “After going through a difficult period, I experienced a rebirth and found a new purpose in life.”
  • In a discussion about spirituality, someone might talk about the concept of rebirth in different religions.
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25. Reincarnate

To reincarnate means to be reborn in a new body or form after death. It can also refer to the belief in the cycle of birth, death, and rebirth.

  • For example, “Some people believe that when they die, they will reincarnate as another living being.”
  • A person might say, “I wonder if I will remember my past lives when I reincarnate.”
  • In a discussion about karma, someone might say, “Your actions in this life will determine how you reincarnate in the next life.”

26. Reshape

To change the form or structure of something. “Reshape” suggests a significant alteration in appearance or function.

  • For example, “After losing weight, she decided to reshape her wardrobe.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, someone might suggest, “We need to reshape this neighborhood to make it more pedestrian-friendly.”
  • A fitness enthusiast might say, “I’m working out to reshape my body and build muscle.”

27. Revamp

To give something a new and improved version or appearance. “Revamp” implies making significant changes to update or modernize.

  • For instance, “The company decided to revamp its website to attract more customers.”
  • In a conversation about interior design, someone might suggest, “Let’s revamp this room by changing the furniture and adding new decor.”
  • A fashion lover might say, “I’m revamping my wardrobe for the new season by adding trendy pieces.”

28. Refashion

To alter or modify something, usually in terms of style or fashion. “Refashion” suggests a creative transformation or reinterpretation.

  • For example, “She refashioned her old jeans into a trendy denim skirt.”
  • In a discussion about sustainable fashion, someone might suggest, “We should refashion old clothes to reduce waste.”
  • A DIY enthusiast might say, “I love to refashion thrift store finds into unique home decor.”

29. Reconstruct

To build again or restore something after it has been damaged or destroyed. “Reconstruct” implies a thorough and careful process of rebuilding.

  • For instance, “After the earthquake, the city had to reconstruct many buildings.”
  • In a conversation about historical preservation, someone might argue, “We should reconstruct this old building to maintain its architectural heritage.”
  • A homeowner might say, “I’m planning to reconstruct my kitchen to create a more functional space.”

30. Swap

To trade or replace one thing with another. “Swap” suggests a simple and straightforward act of substitution.

  • For example, “Let’s swap our books so we can read something different.”
  • In a discussion about healthy eating, someone might suggest, “Try swapping white rice for quinoa.”
  • A fashionista might say, “I like to swap accessories to change up my outfits.”

31. Metamorphize

To undergo a complete and dramatic change in form, appearance, or character. “Metamorphize” is a more creative and imaginative way of expressing the concept of transformation.

  • For example, a person might say, “I want to metamorphize my old bedroom into a home office.”
  • In a discussion about personal growth, someone might say, “I’ve been working hard to metamorphize into a better version of myself.”
  • A writer might describe a character’s development by saying, “Throughout the story, the protagonist undergoes a metamorphosis, metamorphizing from a shy introvert to a confident leader.”

32. Rehash

To rework or reuse existing material, ideas, or concepts. “Rehash” often implies a lack of originality or creativity, suggesting that something is being repeated without significant changes.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m tired of hearing him rehash the same old arguments.”
  • In a critique of a movie sequel, someone might say, “The film felt like a rehash of the original, lacking fresh ideas.”
  • A writer might receive feedback on their work, with someone suggesting, “You need to rehash this section and come up with something new.”

33. Reimagine

To envision or conceive of something in a new and different way. “Reimagine” suggests a creative and innovative approach to transforming or reinventing something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I want to reimagine the traditional concept of a wedding and create a unique experience.”
  • In a discussion about urban planning, someone might propose, “Let’s reimagine this neighborhood and design it to be more sustainable and community-oriented.”
  • An artist might describe their work by saying, “I aim to reimagine familiar landscapes and present them in a surreal and dreamlike manner.”

34. Reinterpret

To interpret or understand something in a new or different way. “Reinterpret” involves giving a fresh perspective or meaning to something that has already been interpreted.

  • For instance, a person might say, “Let’s reinterpret this classic novel through a feminist lens.”
  • In a discussion about historical events, someone might argue, “We need to reinterpret these events based on new evidence and perspectives.”
  • A music critic might review a cover song, commenting, “The artist’s reinterpretation of the original adds a unique and refreshing twist.”

35. Renovate

To restore or improve something by making significant changes or updates. “Renovate” often refers to the process of rejuvenating a physical space or structure.

  • For example, a person might say, “We’re planning to renovate our kitchen and install new appliances.”
  • In a discussion about urban development, someone might suggest, “Let’s renovate this old building and turn it into a vibrant community center.”
  • A homeowner might describe their renovation project, saying, “We’re renovating our bathroom to create a more modern and functional space.”

36. Reinvigorate

To bring new life or energy to something or someone. “Reinvigorate” is often used to describe a renewed passion or enthusiasm for a particular interest or belief.

  • For example, “I joined a new workout class and it really reinvigorated my fitness routine.”
  • A person might say, “Traveling to a new country always reinvigorates my love for exploring different cultures.”
  • Another might say, “Listening to my favorite band’s new album really reinvigorated my love for their music.”

37. Rekindle

To revive or reignite something, often referring to a past relationship or interest. “Rekindle” implies bringing back the same level of intensity or passion that was present before.

  • For instance, “After a few years apart, they decided to rekindle their romance.”
  • A person might say, “I want to rekindle my love for painting and start creating art again.”
  • Another might say, “I hope this trip will rekindle my sense of adventure and exploration.”

38. Resurrect

To revive or bring back something that was once dead or inactive. “Resurrect” is often used metaphorically to describe reviving a belief or interest that was previously abandoned or forgotten.

  • For example, “She resurrected her old blog and started writing again.”
  • A person might say, “I want to resurrect my love for playing the piano and start practicing again.”
  • Another might say, “This book really resurrected my interest in historical fiction.”

39. Revitalize

To renew or restore something with fresh energy or vitality. “Revitalize” implies bringing new life and vigor to something that may have become stagnant or dull.

  • For instance, “The city’s downtown area was revitalized with new restaurants and shops.”
  • A person might say, “Taking a vacation always revitalizes my mind and body.”
  • Another might say, “This new skincare routine has revitalized my skin and made it look healthier.”

40. Reawaken

To awaken or bring back to consciousness something that was dormant or inactive. “Reawaken” is often used to describe a renewed awareness or interest in something that was previously forgotten or overlooked.

  • For example, “Traveling to a new place always reawakens my sense of wonder.”
  • A person might say, “Listening to this song reawakened my love for music.”
  • Another might say, “This documentary reawakened my interest in environmental issues.”

41. Reintegrate

This term refers to the act of joining or integrating back into a group or organization after being separated or removed. It can also signify the process of incorporating previously separate parts into a unified whole.

  • For instance, a person who left a company and then returned might say, “I decided to reintegrate into the team and continue my work.”
  • In a discussion about merging two departments, someone might suggest, “Let’s reintegrate the marketing and sales teams to improve collaboration.”
  • A military unit might discuss the need to reintegrate soldiers after they return from deployment.
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42. Reincorporate

This term means to bring something or someone back into a larger entity or organization. It often implies the act of including or integrating something that was previously excluded or separate.

  • For example, a company that had outsourced its customer service might decide to reincorporate it back into the main office.
  • In a discussion about expanding a business, someone might propose, “We should reincorporate our subsidiary into the main company to streamline operations.”
  • A community organization might discuss the need to reincorporate certain marginalized groups to ensure inclusivity.

43. Reinduct

This term refers to the act of formally welcoming someone back into a group or organization, often after a period of absence or separation. It can also signify the process of accepting someone into a new role or position.

  • For instance, a sports team might reinduct a player who had previously retired but decided to come back.
  • In a discussion about a leadership change, someone might say, “We need to reinduct the new CEO and provide them with the necessary resources.”
  • A club might hold a reinduction ceremony for members who had taken a break but decided to rejoin.

44. Reindustrialize

This term refers to the process of revitalizing or restoring industrial activity in a region or country. It often involves the reintroduction of manufacturing or other industrial sectors that had declined or disappeared.

  • For example, a government might implement policies to reindustrialize a struggling city and create new job opportunities.
  • In a discussion about economic development, someone might propose, “We should focus on reindustrializing our country to stimulate growth.”
  • A business owner might explore ways to reindustrialize their production processes to increase efficiency and competitiveness.
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45. Reinform

This term means to provide someone with new or updated information or knowledge, often to correct misconceptions or outdated beliefs. It can also refer to the act of reinforcing existing knowledge or skills.

  • For instance, a teacher might take the time to reinform their students about a particular topic before moving on to a related subject.
  • In a discussion about public health, someone might suggest, “We need to reinform the public about the importance of vaccinations.”
  • A coach might reinform their team about the game plan before an important match.

46. Reinspire

To reawaken or revive someone’s passion, motivation, or inspiration. “Reinspire” is a slang term used to describe the act of reigniting someone’s enthusiasm or drive.

  • For example, a coach might say, “I need to reinspire my team after a tough loss.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Let’s reinspire ourselves to reach for our dreams.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m feeling down lately, I need something to reinspire me.”

47. Reinstill

To reintroduce or reestablish a belief, value, or quality in someone. “Reinstill” is a slang term used to describe the act of bringing back a certain mindset or attitude.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I want to reinstill a love for learning in my students.”
  • A parent might try to reinstill good manners in their child by saying, “Remember to say ‘please’ and ‘thank you’.”
  • A coach might reinstill confidence in their team by saying, “Believe in yourselves and your abilities.”

48. Reinvolve

To reengage or involve someone in a particular activity, situation, or relationship. “Reinvolve” is a slang term used to describe the act of getting someone back into a certain involvement or participation.

  • For example, a colleague might say, “We need to reinvolve John in the project, his expertise is crucial.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s reinvolve Sarah in our group activities, she’s been feeling left out.”
  • A team captain might reinvolve a player who was previously injured by saying, “We need you back on the field, let’s reinvolve you in the game.”