Top 45 Slang For Tomfoolery – Meaning & Usage

Engage in some lighthearted fun with the top slang for tomfoolery. Whether you’re a prankster at heart or just looking to add some humor to your vocabulary, this listicle has got you covered. Let’s dive into the world of playful antics and mischievous behavior with our compilation of the most entertaining and quirky slang words for tomfoolery.

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1. Shenanigans

This term refers to playful or mischievous behavior, often involving pranks, tricks, or deceit. It is used to describe actions that are meant to cause amusement or confusion.

  • For example, a group of friends might plan some shenanigans for April Fool’s Day.
  • In a comedy movie, a character might say, “Get ready for some hilarious shenanigans!”
  • If someone is caught in the act of mischief, they might say, “It’s all just harmless shenanigans.”

2. Hijinks

Hijinks refers to lively, boisterous, or mischievous behavior that is meant to be entertaining or amusing. It often involves playful pranks, practical jokes, or silly antics.

  • For instance, a group of friends might engage in hijinks during a weekend getaway.
  • In a comedy show, the characters might get into all sorts of hilarious hijinks.
  • If someone is planning a fun and playful event, they might say, “Join us for a night of hijinks and laughter!”

3. Antics

Antics are playful or amusing actions that are often meant to entertain or provoke a reaction. They can be silly, mischievous, or even absurd in nature.

  • For example, a clown at a circus might perform funny antics to make the audience laugh.
  • In a comedy skit, the actors might engage in hilarious antics to create humor.
  • If someone is being particularly silly or outrageous, they might say, “Look at the antics they’re up to!”

4. Malarkey

Malarkey refers to nonsense, foolishness, or exaggerated talk or behavior. It is often used to describe something that is considered ridiculous or unbelievable.

  • For instance, if someone tells a far-fetched story, you might respond with, “That’s a load of malarkey!”
  • In a heated argument, one person might accuse the other of talking malarkey.
  • If someone is making up excuses or giving false information, you might say, “Don’t listen to their malarkey!”

5. Monkey business

Monkey business refers to mischievous or deceitful behavior, often involving tricks, pranks, or dishonest actions. It is used to describe actions that are meant to deceive or cause trouble.

  • For example, if someone catches a child being mischievous, they might say, “No more monkey business!”
  • In a comedy movie, the characters might get into all sorts of hilarious monkey business.
  • If someone suspects someone else of being up to no good, they might say, “I smell some monkey business going on here!”

6. Nonsense

Nonsense refers to something that is absurd, illogical, or without any real purpose or meaning.

  • For example, “Stop talking nonsense and get back to work.”
  • During a heated argument, one might say, “Don’t listen to him, he’s just spouting nonsense.”
  • When someone makes an outrageous claim, you might respond, “That’s complete nonsense!”

7. Buffoonery

Buffoonery refers to silly or foolish behavior, often intended to entertain or amuse others.

  • For instance, “The comedian’s buffoonery had the audience in stitches.”
  • During a party, someone might engage in buffoonery by wearing a silly costume and performing funny skits.
  • When someone acts in a foolish manner, you might say, “Quit the buffoonery and start taking things seriously!”

8. Pranks

Pranks are playful or mischievous tricks or practical jokes that are intended to surprise, amuse, or sometimes embarrass someone.

  • For example, “The students played a prank on their teacher by filling the classroom with balloons.”
  • During April Fool’s Day, people often play pranks on their friends and family members.
  • Someone might say, “I pulled a prank on my coworker by switching their coffee with decaf.”

9. Horseplay

Horseplay refers to rough or rowdy play, often involving physical contact, that is meant to be fun or playful.

  • For instance, “The children were engaged in horseplay in the backyard.”
  • During recess, students might engage in horseplay on the playground.
  • When someone is being too rough during a game, you might say, “Hey, no horseplay allowed!”

10. Capers

Capers refer to playful or mischievous escapades or adventures, often involving daring or risky behavior.

  • For example, “The group of friends went on a series of capers during their summer vacation.”
  • In a movie, the main characters might embark on a series of capers to achieve their goals.
  • When someone suggests an exciting or adventurous activity, you might say, “That sounds like a fun caper!”

11. Foolery

Foolery refers to silly or foolish behavior that is meant to entertain or amuse others. It often involves playful or mischievous actions.

  • For example, a clown at a circus might engage in foolery to make the audience laugh.
  • During a practical joke, someone might say, “Stop your foolery and give me back my phone!”
  • A parent might scold their child for engaging in foolery by saying, “No more fooling around, it’s time to do your homework.”

12. Tomfoolery

Tomfoolery is a lighthearted term used to describe silly or foolish behavior. It often involves playful or mischievous actions done for the purpose of amusement.

  • For instance, during a prank, someone might say, “That’s just a bit of tomfoolery, nothing serious.”
  • If someone is being silly, a friend might say, “Cut out the tomfoolery and let’s get to work.”
  • In a comedy skit, an actor might engage in tomfoolery to entertain the audience.
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13. Skulduggery

Skulduggery refers to underhanded or deceitful behavior, often done with the intention of tricking or deceiving others. It implies dishonesty or trickery.

  • For example, a character in a mystery novel might engage in skulduggery to manipulate others and achieve their own goals.
  • During a political campaign, one candidate might accuse the other of engaging in skulduggery to gain an advantage.
  • A person might warn their friend about a dishonest business partner by saying, “Watch out for his skulduggery, he can’t be trusted.”

14. Monkeyshines

Monkeyshines refers to mischievous or playful behavior, often done for the purpose of entertainment or amusement. It implies a sense of lighthearted mischief.

  • For instance, during a playful argument, someone might say, “Stop your monkeyshines and let’s get back to work.”
  • If a child is being mischievous, a parent might say, “No more monkeyshines, it’s time to behave.”
  • In a comedy show, a performer might engage in monkeyshines to make the audience laugh.

15. Rascality

Rascality refers to mischievous or dishonest behavior, often done with the intention of causing trouble or mischief. It implies a sense of playfulness combined with a lack of respect for rules or authority.

  • For example, a group of friends might engage in rascality by pulling pranks on each other.
  • If someone is being mischievous, a teacher might say, “Stop your rascality and pay attention.”
  • A parent might scold their child for engaging in rascality by saying, “That kind of rascality is not acceptable in this house.”

16. Nonsensical

This word refers to something that lacks sense or reason. It can describe ideas, statements, or actions that are irrational or without purpose.

  • For example, “His explanation was completely nonsensical, I couldn’t understand what he was trying to say.”
  • In a discussion about a confusing situation, someone might say, “The whole thing was just nonsensical, I couldn’t make sense of it.”
  • A person might use this word to describe a joke that doesn’t make any sense, saying, “That joke was so nonsensical, I didn’t know whether to laugh or be confused.”

17. Clowning around

This phrase refers to engaging in playful or silly behavior, often for the purpose of entertaining others or having fun.

  • For instance, “The kids were clowning around in the backyard, laughing and playing.”
  • In a group of friends, someone might say, “Let’s stop working for a while and just clown around for a bit.”
  • A teacher might use this phrase to scold students who are being disruptive, saying, “Stop clowning around and pay attention!”

18. Goofing off

This phrase refers to engaging in unproductive or idle behavior, often as a way to avoid work or responsibilities.

  • For example, “Instead of studying, he spent the whole afternoon goofing off with his friends.”
  • In a workplace setting, a supervisor might say, “Stop goofing off and get back to work!”
  • A parent might scold their child for not doing their chores, saying, “You’ve been goofing off all day instead of helping around the house.”

19. Jiggery-pokery

This term refers to deceptive or dishonest behavior, often with the intention of tricking or fooling others.

  • For instance, “He used some jiggery-pokery to cheat his way to the top of the leaderboard.”
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “There’s a lot of jiggery-pokery going on behind the scenes.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a magic trick that involves deception, saying, “The magician’s jiggery-pokery had the audience in awe.”

20. High jinks

This phrase refers to boisterous or mischievous behavior, often involving pranks, jokes, or playful antics.

  • For example, “The group of friends got up to all sorts of high jinks during their vacation.”
  • In a discussion about a party, someone might say, “There were plenty of high jinks and laughter throughout the night.”
  • A parent might scold their child for engaging in high jinks, saying, “Stop with the high jinks and behave yourself!”

21. Skullduggery

Skullduggery refers to underhanded or sneaky actions, often with the intention of deceiving or tricking others.

  • For example, “The politician was involved in all sorts of skullduggery to gain an advantage in the election.”
  • In a crime novel, a detective might uncover a plot of skullduggery among the suspects.
  • A person might say, “I don’t trust him, there’s always some skullduggery going on behind the scenes.”

22. Monkey tricks

Monkey tricks are playful or mischievous actions that are often done for amusement or to cause a bit of chaos.

  • For instance, “The kids were up to their usual monkey tricks, running around and laughing.”
  • In a comedy movie, a character might engage in silly monkey tricks to entertain the audience.
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe they pulled off those monkey tricks without getting caught.”

23. Folly

Folly refers to actions or behavior that are considered silly, foolish, or lacking in good judgment.

  • For example, “His decision to quit his job without a backup plan was an act of folly.”
  • In a comedy skit, a performer might engage in acts of folly to entertain the audience.
  • A person might say, “It’s all fun and games until someone’s folly gets them into trouble.”

24. Capering

Capering refers to lively and playful movements or behavior, often done with a sense of joy or excitement.

  • For instance, “The children were capering around the park, laughing and playing.”
  • In a dance performance, the dancers might engage in capering to showcase their energy and enthusiasm.
  • A person might say, “Let’s go out and have some capering fun tonight!”

25. Clownery

Clownery refers to behavior that is foolish, silly, or ridiculous, often done to entertain or amuse others.

  • For example, “The comedian’s clownery had the audience laughing hysterically.”
  • In a circus performance, a clown might engage in various acts of clownery to entertain the crowd.
  • A person might say, “I can’t believe he’s still engaging in that clownery, even at his age.”

26. Zaniness

Zaniness refers to behavior or actions that are wild, unpredictable, and often humorous. It is associated with a sense of fun and lightheartedness.

  • For example, “His zaniness always keeps the party entertaining.”
  • A person might say, “I love the zaniness of this comedy show.”
  • Another might describe a situation as “full of zaniness and chaos.”
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27. Larking about

Larking about is a phrase used to describe engaging in playful or mischievous activities. It implies a sense of fun and mischief, often involving harmless pranks or joking around.

  • For instance, “We spent the afternoon larking about in the park.”
  • A person might say, “Stop larking about and get back to work.”
  • Another might describe a group of friends as “always larking about and causing laughter.”

28. Japes

Japes are pranks or practical jokes that are meant to be funny and lighthearted. It refers to playful and mischievous actions done for the purpose of amusement.

  • For example, “He pulled off some hilarious japes during the office party.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s plan some japes for April Fools’ Day.”
  • Another might describe a comedian’s performance as “full of clever japes and witty humor.”

29. Trickery

Trickery refers to the act of deceiving or misleading someone for personal gain or amusement. It involves using cunning or deceitful tactics to achieve a desired outcome.

  • For instance, “He used trickery to win the game.”
  • A person might say, “Beware of his trickery; he can be quite manipulative.”
  • Another might describe a magician’s performance as “full of illusions and trickery.”

30. Mischief

Mischief refers to playful or naughty behavior that is often mischievous and harmless. It involves engaging in activities that are fun and entertaining, but may also cause minor trouble or annoyance.

  • For example, “The children got into mischief while their parents were away.”
  • A person might say, “She has a mischievous smile that always hints at some mischief.”
  • Another might describe a group of friends as “always up to mischief and causing laughter.”

31. Foppery

Foppery refers to behavior that is considered silly or foolish. It often involves dressing in an exaggerated or flamboyant manner.

  • For example, “He paraded around in foppery, wearing a brightly colored suit and a feathered hat.”
  • In a discussion about fashion, someone might say, “I appreciate a bit of foppery in men’s clothing.”
  • A person describing a comedic performance might comment, “The actor’s foppery added an extra layer of humor to the play.”

32. Slapstick

Slapstick refers to a type of comedy that relies on exaggerated movements, actions, and physical humor. It often involves characters getting hit, falling, or engaging in other comedic mishaps.

  • For instance, “The Three Stooges were known for their slapstick comedy routines.”
  • In a conversation about classic comedy films, someone might mention, “Charlie Chaplin’s movies often incorporated slapstick humor.”
  • A person describing a funny video might say, “It’s just a bunch of slapstick humor with people slipping and falling.”

33. Frivolity

Frivolity refers to a lack of seriousness or importance. It often involves engaging in lighthearted or trivial activities without much thought or concern.

  • For example, “The party was filled with frivolity, with guests dancing and laughing.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, someone might say, “It’s important to have moments of frivolity to relieve stress.”
  • A person describing a carefree vacation might comment, “We spent the week in a state of pure frivolity, enjoying every moment without a care in the world.”

34. Jest

Jest refers to a playful or humorous act or remark. It often involves making jokes, teasing, or engaging in light-hearted banter.

  • For instance, “He couldn’t resist making a jest at his friend’s expense.”
  • In a conversation about stand-up comedy, someone might mention, “The comedian’s jests had the audience roaring with laughter.”
  • A person describing a funny story might say, “It all started with a jest that turned into a hilarious series of events.”

35. Giggles

Giggles refers to light-hearted laughter or amusement. It often involves small bursts of laughter that are spontaneous and uncontrollable.

  • For example, “The group of friends couldn’t help but break into giggles at the silly joke.”
  • In a discussion about funny moments, someone might say, “I always get the giggles when I watch that comedy show.”
  • A person describing a humorous situation might comment, “The room was filled with giggles as everyone enjoyed the lighthearted atmosphere.”

36. Rib-tickler

This term refers to something that is extremely funny or amusing, often used to describe a joke that makes someone laugh uncontrollably.

  • For example, “That comedian’s stand-up routine was a real rib-tickler.”
  • A person might say, “I heard a rib-tickler today that had me in stitches.”
  • Someone might share a funny story and say, “Here’s a rib-tickler for you all.”

37. Whimsy

Whimsy refers to behavior or actions that are light-hearted, playful, or fanciful, often involving a sense of humor or fun.

  • For instance, “The children’s book was filled with whimsy and imagination.”
  • A person might describe someone as having a whimsical personality and say, “She always brings a sense of whimsy to every situation.”
  • Someone might create a whimsical artwork or design and say, “I wanted to capture a sense of whimsy in this piece.”

38. Drollery

Drollery refers to behavior that is amusing or funny, often characterized by a dry or subtle sense of humor.

  • For example, “His drollery always brings a smile to my face.”
  • A person might describe a comedian’s performance as full of drollery and say, “I love his drollery and wit.”
  • Someone might make a sarcastic comment and say, “Just adding a touch of drollery to the conversation.”

39. Farce

Farce refers to a situation or event that is absurd, ridiculous, or exaggerated, often involving humorous or farcical elements.

  • For instance, “The play was a farce, filled with mistaken identities and comedic misunderstandings.”
  • A person might describe a chaotic or nonsensical situation as a farce and say, “It’s all just a farce at this point.”
  • Someone might watch a comedy movie and say, “I love a good farce that keeps me laughing throughout.”

40. Larks

Larks refers to playful or mischievous activities done for fun or amusement, often involving a sense of adventure or spontaneity.

  • For example, “We decided to go on a road trip on a whim, just for larks.”
  • A person might describe a group of friends engaging in playful activities and say, “We’re always up to larks when we get together.”
  • Someone might suggest a spontaneous activity and say, “Let’s go for a hike and have some larks along the way.”

41. Nonsensical behavior

This refers to behavior that lacks logic or reasoning. It is often characterized by actions that are silly, irrational, or illogical.

  • For example, “His nonsensical behavior left everyone confused and amused.”
  • In a discussion about strange actions, someone might say, “I can’t understand why he engages in such nonsensical behavior.”
  • Another might comment, “Her nonsensical behavior always brings laughter to the room.”

42. Silly antics

This term refers to playful and foolish actions that are meant to entertain or amuse others. Silly antics often involve humorous or lighthearted behavior.

  • For instance, “The children’s silly antics had everyone laughing.”
  • In a conversation about funny moments, someone might say, “I’ll never forget the silly antics we got up to during that vacation.”
  • A comedian might incorporate silly antics into their performance to create laughter.
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43. Prankster behavior

This term describes behavior that involves playing tricks or practical jokes on others. Prankster behavior is often intended to surprise or amuse, but it can also sometimes be seen as mischievous or even mean-spirited.

  • For example, “He is known for his prankster behavior, always pulling pranks on his friends.”
  • In a discussion about practical jokes, someone might say, “I love the thrill of prankster behavior, as long as it’s harmless.”
  • Another might comment, “Her prankster behavior can sometimes go too far and upset people.”

44. Folly-filled antics

This term refers to actions that are both foolish and playful in nature. Folly-filled antics are often characterized by a lack of seriousness and a desire to have fun or bring laughter.

  • For instance, “The group’s folly-filled antics entertained everyone at the party.”
  • In a conversation about humorous moments, someone might say, “We engaged in folly-filled antics during our road trip, making it a memorable experience.”
  • A comedian might incorporate folly-filled antics into their performance to create a sense of joy and amusement.

45. Buffoonish behavior

This term describes behavior that is ridiculous, clownish, or foolish in nature. Buffoonish behavior is often characterized by exaggerated gestures, silly expressions, or comedic actions.

  • For example, “His buffoonish behavior always brings laughter to the room.”
  • In a discussion about comedic performances, someone might say, “He is a master of buffoonish behavior, always making the audience laugh.”
  • Another might comment, “Her buffoonish behavior adds a touch of whimsy to every situation.”