Top 69 Slang For Have – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ownership or possession, the English language offers a wide range of slang terms for the word “have.” From casual conversations to social media captions, these slang expressions add flavor and personality to our everyday language. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for “have” that you need to know. Whether you want to stay up-to-date with the latest trends or simply expand your vocabulary, this article has got you covered. So, let’s dive in and discover the exciting ways we can talk about having things!

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1. got

This is a colloquial term used to indicate possession or ownership of something. It can also be used to express the act of obtaining or receiving something.

  • For example, “I got a new car yesterday.”
  • In a conversation about personal belongings, someone might say, “I’ve got a lot of books.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you got any plans for the weekend?”

2. own

To have something as one’s own, either through ownership or control. It implies a sense of personal responsibility or authority over the item or concept.

  • For instance, “I own a house in the suburbs.”
  • In a discussion about personal achievements, someone might say, “I own my own business.”
  • A person might assert, “I own my mistakes and learn from them.”

3. hold

To have and keep something in one’s possession or control. It can also imply a sense of power or influence over something.

  • For example, “I hold the key to her heart.”
  • In a conversation about assets, someone might say, “He holds a large portfolio of investments.”
  • A person might state, “I hold the power to make important decisions.”

4. keep

To have and retain possession or control of something. It implies the act of safeguarding or preserving something.

  • For instance, “I keep my personal documents in a safe.”
  • In a discussion about personal habits, someone might say, “I keep a journal to track my progress.”
  • A person might advise, “Keep your emotions in check during a difficult conversation.”

5. acquire

To obtain or gain possession or control of something. It suggests the act of actively seeking and obtaining something.

  • For example, “I acquired a rare collectible at an auction.”
  • In a conversation about skills, someone might say, “I acquired fluency in a foreign language through years of practice.”
  • A person might share, “I acquired valuable knowledge during my time working in the industry.”

6. obtain

To acquire or come into possession of something. “Obtain” is a formal term that is sometimes used in a more casual or slang context.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to obtain a copy of that book before it sells out.”
  • In a conversation about rare collectibles, someone might mention, “I finally obtained that limited edition vinyl I’ve been searching for.”
  • A person discussing their goals might say, “My main objective is to obtain financial stability.”

7. possess

To have or hold something. “Possess” is a more formal term that can also be used in a casual or slang context.

  • For example, someone might say, “I possess the skills necessary for this job.”
  • In a discussion about personal belongings, a person might mention, “I possess a collection of vintage records.”
  • A person talking about their attributes might say, “I possess a strong work ethic and determination.”

8. retain

To continue to have or hold something. “Retain” often implies the act of keeping something despite potential challenges or obstacles.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I want to retain my current position at work.”
  • In a conversation about memory, someone might mention, “I struggle to retain information from textbooks.”
  • A person discussing their values might say, “It’s important to retain a sense of integrity in all aspects of life.”

9. gain

To obtain or come into possession of something through effort or action. “Gain” can also refer to achieving success or making progress in a particular area.

  • For example, a person might say, “I want to gain more experience in my field.”
  • In a discussion about fitness, someone might mention, “I’ve been working out to gain muscle mass.”
  • A person talking about personal growth might say, “I’ve gained a lot of confidence since starting therapy.”

10. receive

To be given or presented with something. “Receive” is a more formal term that can also be used in a casual or slang context.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I received a gift from a friend.”
  • In a conversation about emails, a person might mention, “I received an important message this morning.”
  • A person discussing achievements might say, “I received recognition for my hard work.”

11. secure

To secure something means to obtain or acquire it. It can refer to getting possession of an item or achieving a particular outcome.

  • For example, “I need to secure a loan to buy a new car.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We secured a new client for the company.”
  • A person discussing a job offer might say, “I secured a position at a top tech company.”

12. pick up

To pick up something means to get or obtain it. It can refer to acquiring an item, learning a new skill, or understanding a concept.

  • For instance, “I need to pick up some groceries on the way home.”
  • In a conversation about language learning, someone might say, “I want to pick up Spanish before my trip to Mexico.”
  • A person discussing a new hobby might say, “I’ve been trying to pick up playing the guitar.”

13. take

To take something means to have possession or control over it. It can refer to physically holding an object or having authority or responsibility over a situation.

  • For example, “Can I take a look at your phone?”
  • In a discussion about leadership, someone might say, “I’m ready to take charge and make decisions.”
  • A person discussing a task might say, “I’ll take care of that for you.”

14. accept

To accept something means to receive or agree to it. It can refer to receiving an offer, agreeing to a proposal, or acknowledging a fact.

  • For instance, “I accepted the job offer and will start next week.”
  • In a conversation about invitations, someone might say, “I can’t attend the party, but thank you for the invite.”
  • A person discussing a difficult truth might say, “It took me a while to accept that the relationship was over.”

15. carry

To carry something means to possess or hold it. It can refer to physically having an item on one’s person or having a particular quality or attribute.

  • For example, “I always carry a pen in my bag.”
  • In a discussion about skills, someone might say, “She carries a lot of talent as a singer.”
  • A person discussing responsibilities might say, “I carry the burden of being the oldest sibling.”

16. enjoy

To derive pleasure or satisfaction from something.

  • For example, “I really enjoy spending time with my friends.”
  • Someone might say, “I enjoy listening to music while I work.”
  • A food lover might exclaim, “I enjoy trying new restaurants and cuisines!”

17. experience

To have firsthand knowledge or encounter something.

  • For instance, “I experienced a thrilling adventure while hiking in the mountains.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve experienced both the joys and challenges of parenthood.”
  • Someone who has traveled extensively might share, “I’ve experienced different cultures and traditions around the world.”

18. endure

To withstand or go through a difficult or challenging situation.

  • For example, “I had to endure a long and grueling workout.”
  • A person might say, “I endured a lot of criticism when I pursued my passion.”
  • Someone who has gone through a breakup might share, “I had to endure a lot of heartache and emotional pain.”

19. bear

To tolerate or accept something unpleasant or difficult.

  • For instance, “I can’t bear the thought of losing my loved ones.”
  • A person might say, “I have to bear the burden of my responsibilities.”
  • Someone dealing with a difficult coworker might say, “I have to bear their constant negativity.”

20. include

To have something as part of a whole or group.

  • For example, “The package includes a free gift.”
  • A person might say, “The price includes all taxes and fees.”
  • Someone organizing an event might announce, “The program will include various performances and activities.”

21. admit

To admit to something, especially something that is embarrassing or incriminating. The term “cop to” is often used in informal conversations or casual settings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have to cop to the fact that I ate all the cookies.”
  • In a conversation about mistakes, a person might say, “I’ll cop to the fact that I messed up.”
  • A person might confess, “I have to cop to the fact that I didn’t study for the exam.”

22. annex

To acquire or take possession of something, often by force or without permission. “Annex” is a more formal and serious term compared to other slang words for “have”.

  • For instance, a country might annex a territory to expand its borders.
  • In a discussion about real estate, someone might say, “I’m looking to annex the adjacent property.”
  • A person might claim, “I’m going to annex that parking spot for myself.”

23. procure

To obtain or acquire something through effort or skill. “Procure” is a more sophisticated and formal word for “have”.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I need to procure more evidence to solve the case.”
  • In a conversation about finding a rare item, someone might say, “I managed to procure a limited edition collectible.”
  • A person might boast, “I have connections that can help me procure anything I want.”

24. land

To land or score something means to obtain it, often with some effort or luck involved. This term is commonly used in casual conversations or informal settings.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I managed to land a job interview.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might say, “I finally landed a date with that person I’ve been interested in.”
  • A person might brag, “I landed a great deal on that new car.”

25. corner

To corner or snag something means to obtain it or have exclusive control over it. The term suggests a sense of dominance or advantage.

  • For example, in a conversation about a popular item, someone might say, “I managed to corner the market on that product.”
  • In a discussion about a specific skill, a person might say, “I’ve cornered the market on graphic design in this town.”
  • A person might assert, “I’ve cornered all the best clients in this industry.”

26. hog

To have or possess something. “Hog” is often used to describe having something in abundance or monopolizing it.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to hog all the popcorn at the movie.”
  • In a discussion about resources, one might say, “We need to make sure one person doesn’t hog all the supplies.”
  • A person describing their possessions might say, “I’ve got a hog of a collection of vintage records.”

27. occupy

To possess or own something. “Occupy” is often used to emphasize ownership or control.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I occupy a large house in the suburbs.”
  • In a conversation about real estate, one might say, “She occupies several rental properties.”
  • A person discussing their personal belongings might say, “I occupy a vast collection of antique furniture.”

28. chalk up

To obtain or acquire something. “Chalk up” is often used to describe getting or gaining possession of something.

  • For example, someone might say, “I chalked up a new car last week.”
  • In a discussion about achievements, one might say, “He chalked up another victory in the game.”
  • A person describing their accomplishments might say, “I’ve chalked up many awards throughout my career.”

29. get hands on

To obtain or acquire something. “Get hands on” is often used to emphasize the act of physically obtaining something.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I finally got my hands on the latest smartphone.”
  • In a conversation about limited edition items, one might say, “It’s hard to get your hands on one of those collectible toys.”
  • A person discussing their collection might say, “I’ve managed to get my hands on some rare comic books.”

30. get hold of

To obtain or acquire something. “Get hold of” is often used to describe the act of obtaining something that may be difficult to find or access.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to get hold of a copy of that book.”
  • In a discussion about exclusive merchandise, one might say, “It’s not easy to get hold of limited edition sneakers.”
  • A person describing their experiences might say, “I’ve managed to get hold of some rare concert tickets.”

31. have in hand

To have something in one’s possession or control. “Have in hand” implies that the item is readily available or within reach.

  • For example, “I always make sure to have my keys in hand before leaving the house.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We have the contract in hand and are ready to proceed.”
  • A person discussing preparation might advise, “Make sure you have all the necessary documents in hand before the meeting.”

32. latch on to

To acquire or obtain something, often eagerly or with determination. “Latch on to” suggests a strong desire or effort to obtain or possess something.

  • For instance, “He latched on to the opportunity to work on that project.”
  • In a conversation about finding a job, someone might say, “I need to latch on to any opportunity that comes my way.”
  • A person discussing trends might comment, “People quickly latched on to the latest fashion craze.”

33. lock up

To have exclusive control over something or to safeguard it from others. “Lock up” implies the act of protecting or securing something.

  • For example, “Make sure to lock up your valuables before leaving the hotel.”
  • In a discussion about financial security, someone might say, “I need to lock up my savings in a secure investment.”
  • A person discussing computer security might advise, “Remember to lock up your computer with a strong password.”

34. sit on

To possess or have knowledge of something but choose not to reveal or share it. “Sit on” suggests intentionally keeping something secret or hidden.

  • For instance, “She’s been sitting on that information for weeks without telling anyone.”
  • In a conversation about a surprise party, someone might say, “We need to make sure everyone can sit on the secret until the day.”
  • A person discussing a confidential document might caution, “Don’t sit on that report; it needs to be shared with the team.”

35. take in

To comprehend or grasp information or a concept. “Take in” implies the act of absorbing or comprehending something.

  • For example, “It took a while for me to take in the complexity of the situation.”
  • In a discussion about a new theory, someone might say, “I need more time to take in all the details.”
  • A person explaining a difficult concept might ask, “Did you take in everything I just explained?”

36. teem with

This slang phrase means to have an abundance of something or to be filled with a large quantity of something.

  • For example, “The market was teeming with people looking for bargains.”
  • A nature enthusiast might say, “The forest is teeming with wildlife.”
  • In a discussion about a busy city, someone might comment, “The streets are teeming with traffic and pedestrians.”

37. Ownage

This slang term refers to having complete control or dominance over someone or something.

  • For instance, a gamer might say, “I just had some serious ownage in that last match.”
  • In a sports context, someone might comment, “The home team’s defense is really showing some ownage.”
  • A person discussing a successful business venture might say, “We achieved total ownage in the market.”

38. Score

In slang terms, “score” means to obtain or acquire something, often with a sense of excitement or accomplishment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I scored some great deals at the thrift store.”
  • A person discussing a successful job interview might say, “I scored the position I’ve been dreaming of.”
  • In a conversation about finding rare collectibles, someone might comment, “I scored a valuable comic book at a garage sale.”

39. Grab

This slang word means to quickly obtain or acquire something, often without much effort.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to grab some groceries on my way home.”
  • In a discussion about a limited-time sale, someone might comment, “I’m going to grab that discounted item before it’s gone.”
  • A person discussing a last-minute travel plan might say, “I managed to grab a cheap flight at the eleventh hour.”

40. Cop

In slang terms, “cop” means to acquire or obtain something, often with a sense of urgency or excitement.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going to cop those new sneakers as soon as they’re released.”
  • A person discussing a successful purchase might say, “I copped a great deal on this designer handbag.”
  • In a conversation about acquiring tickets to a popular concert, someone might comment, “I’m trying to cop tickets before they sell out.”

41. Snag

To obtain or get something, often with some effort or difficulty.

  • For example, “I managed to snag tickets to the concert.”
  • A person might say, “I’m hoping to snag a promotion at work.”
  • Another might exclaim, “Did you see the dress she managed to snag? It’s gorgeous!”

42. Bag

To successfully obtain or achieve something.

  • For instance, “He finally bagged the job he’s been wanting.”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to bag a scholarship for college.”
  • Another might boast, “I managed to bag a great deal on that new car.”

43. Lay hands on

To acquire or obtain something, often with the implication of exerting effort or overcoming obstacles.

  • For example, “I’ll do whatever it takes to lay my hands on that rare collectible.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been trying to lay my hands on a copy of that book for months.”
  • Another might exclaim, “If I could lay my hands on some extra cash, I’d go on a shopping spree!”

44. Garner

To gather or collect something, often over time or through effort.

  • For instance, “She has garnered a lot of praise for her performance in the play.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been able to garner a lot of support for my cause.”
  • Another might note, “He has garnered a reputation for being a reliable and skilled worker.”

45. Attain

To reach or accomplish something, often after working towards it.

  • For example, “She was able to attain her dream of becoming a doctor.”
  • A person might say, “I’m determined to attain a high level of success in my career.”
  • Another might exclaim, “He has attained a level of fame that few can achieve in their lifetime.”

46. Come by

To obtain or gain possession of something.

  • For example, “I managed to come by some concert tickets for tonight.”
  • A friend might say, “I’ll see if I can come by some extra chairs for the party.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you know where I can come by some good coffee beans?”

47. Take possession of

To acquire or gain control or ownership of something.

  • For instance, “He took possession of the stolen goods.”
  • A real estate agent might say, “The new owners will take possession of the house next week.”
  • A lawyer might advise, “You should take possession of any important documents during the divorce process.”

48. Commandeer

To take control or possession of something, often by force or authority.

  • For example, “The military commandeer vehicles during times of war.”
  • A friend might say, “I had to commandeer my sister’s car for the weekend.”
  • A police officer might commandeer a civilian’s vehicle during a high-speed chase.
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49. Snatch up

To quickly and eagerly take hold of or acquire something.

  • For instance, “She snatched up the last pair of shoes in her size.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to snatch up that limited edition item before it sells out.”
  • A friend might ask, “Did you manage to snatch up any good deals during the sale?”

50. Scoop up

To gather or collect something, often swiftly or effortlessly.

  • For example, “He scooped up the fallen papers and put them back on the desk.”
  • A parent might say, “I need to scoop up the kids from school.”
  • A person might scoop up some snacks from the buffet table at a party.

51. Nab

This slang term means to take or seize something quickly or unexpectedly. It is often used to describe stealing or capturing something.

  • For example, “He managed to nab the last slice of pizza before anyone else could.”
  • In a news headline, you might see, “Police nab suspect in bank robbery.”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to nab that promotion at work.”

52. Pocket

When used as slang for “have,” this term means to keep or possess something, often in a secretive or discreet manner.

  • For instance, “He pocketed the extra cash without anyone noticing.”
  • In a conversation about a stolen item, someone might say, “I saw him pocketing the necklace.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you pocket any souvenirs from the trip?”

53. Win

In slang, “win” can mean to achieve or obtain something, often in a competitive or desirable context.

  • For example, “She won a scholarship to attend college.”
  • In a discussion about job interviews, someone might say, “I really want to win that job.”
  • A person might exclaim, “I won tickets to the concert!”

54. Hold onto

This slang phrase means to keep or retain possession of something, often in the face of challenges or difficulties.

  • For instance, “She managed to hold onto her job during the company’s downsizing.”
  • In a conversation about a valuable item, someone might say, “I’m going to hold onto this necklace for safekeeping.”
  • A person might advise, “Hold onto your dreams and never give up.”

55. Get

When used as slang for “have,” “get” means to obtain or acquire something.

  • For example, “I need to get a new car.”
  • In a discussion about a new gadget, someone might ask, “Where can I get one of those?”
  • A person might say, “I finally got my dream job!”

56. Capture

To capture or obtain something, often by force or through skillful tactics.

  • For example, a military commander might say, “Our mission is to capture the enemy’s stronghold.”
  • In a game of capture the flag, a player might shout, “I’ve captured the flag!”
  • A news headline might read, “Police capture fugitive after long manhunt.”

57. Seize

To seize or take control of something, often forcefully or abruptly.

  • For instance, a government might seize assets from a criminal organization.
  • In a dramatic movie scene, a character might seize control of a situation by making a bold move.
  • A news report might state, “Protesters seized the city square in a show of defiance.”

58. Claim

To claim or assert ownership or possession of something.

  • For example, a person might claim a prize they won in a contest.
  • In a debate, a participant might claim to have evidence supporting their argument.
  • A news headline might read, “Actor claims to have witnessed the crime.”

59. Maintain

To maintain or keep possession or control of something.

  • For instance, a person might maintain control of a situation by staying calm and focused.
  • In a sports game, a team might maintain possession of the ball to secure a victory.
  • A supervisor might instruct their employees, “Make sure to maintain the quality standards.”

60. Control

To control or have power over something or someone.

  • For example, a dictator might control the media to suppress opposition.
  • In a business setting, a manager might control the decision-making process.
  • A news report might state, “The company has gained control of a major market share.”

61. Command

To have authority or power over something or someone. “Command” implies a level of control or dominance.

  • For example, a military officer might say, “I command this unit.”
  • In a business setting, a manager might assert, “I command the respect of my team.”
  • A person discussing leadership might state, “To be an effective leader, you must command the attention and trust of your followers.”

62. Obtainment

The act of obtaining or acquiring something. “Obtainment” suggests actively seeking and acquiring something.

  • For instance, a collector might say, “I recently added a rare coin to my obtainment.”
  • A person discussing career goals might declare, “My obtainment of a master’s degree was a significant milestone.”
  • Another might say, “The obtainment of wealth should not be the sole measure of success.”

63. Possession

Having something in one’s control or ownership. “Possession” refers to the state of having or owning something.

  • For example, a person might say, “I have possession of the remote control.”
  • In a legal context, someone might assert, “The possession of stolen property is a crime.”
  • A person discussing materialism might argue, “Our society places too much value on the possession of material goods.”

64. Keep hold of

To continue to have or hold onto something. “Keep hold of” emphasizes the action of maintaining possession.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “Keep hold of your pencils until the end of the test.”
  • A person discussing relationships might advise, “In a healthy partnership, both individuals should work to keep hold of their individuality.”
  • Another might say, “It’s important to keep hold of your dreams and aspirations.”

65. Keep possession of

To continue to have or hold onto something. “Keep possession of” stresses the ongoing action of maintaining ownership.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Keep possession of the ball to control the game.”
  • A person discussing financial stability might advise, “It’s important to keep possession of your savings and investments.”
  • Another might say, “In order to keep possession of our natural resources, we must prioritize sustainable practices.”

66. Realize

This term is used to indicate understanding or comprehension of something. It implies that the person has come to a realization or has finally grasped a concept.

  • For example, if someone explains a difficult concept and you finally understand, you might say, “Oh, now I realize what you meant.”
  • In a conversation about a mistake, one might say, “I realize now that I should have handled it differently.”
  • If someone explains a joke and you finally understand the punchline, you might exclaim, “Oh, I get it now! That’s hilarious!”

67. Achieve

This term refers to successfully completing a goal or reaching a desired outcome. It implies that the person has put in effort and overcome obstacles to obtain something.

  • For instance, if someone sets a goal to run a marathon and they successfully complete it, they can say, “I achieved my goal of finishing a marathon.”
  • In a discussion about career success, one might say, “She has achieved great success in her field.”
  • If someone accomplishes a difficult task, you might commend them by saying, “Well done! You’ve achieved something amazing.”

68. Earn

This slang term means to earn money or receive a salary. It implies that the person has worked hard and deserves the financial reward.

  • For example, if someone asks about your job, you can say, “I work as a software engineer and I earn a good salary.”
  • In a conversation about financial stability, one might say, “She works two jobs to earn enough to support her family.”
  • If someone receives a promotion and a raise, you might say, “Congratulations! You’ve earned that promotion and the higher salary.”

69. Gather

This term means to obtain or acquire something. It implies that the person has collected or gathered something, whether it be physical items or information.

  • For instance, if someone asks if you have the necessary documents, you can say, “Yes, I’ve gathered all the required paperwork.”
  • In a discussion about research, one might say, “I’ve gathered a lot of data for my project.”
  • If someone collects evidence or information, you might say, “They’ve been gathering evidence to support their case.”