Top 92 Slang For Concern – Meaning & Usage

In today’s fast-paced world, it’s important to stay in the loop and understand the latest slang and trends. When it comes to expressing concern, language is constantly evolving, and keeping up with the latest slang can be a challenge. But worry not, because we’ve got you covered. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of the top slang terms for concern that will not only keep you up to date but also help you navigate conversations with ease. So, buckle up and get ready to learn some new lingo that will have you sounding like a pro in no time!

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1. Sus

Short for “suspicious,” this term is used to describe someone or something that seems shady or untrustworthy.

  • For example, “I saw him hanging around the back alley, looking sus.”
  • In a game of Among Us, a player might say, “I think Red is sus because they were alone in the electrical room.”
  • A friend might warn you, “Be careful, that new guy at work seems a little sus.”

2. Bet

Used as a response to indicate agreement or confirmation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Want to grab dinner tonight?” and you can reply, “Bet, I’m down.”
  • If a friend asks if you’re ready to leave, you can respond with, “Bet, let’s go.”
  • When making plans, you might say, “Bet, I’ll meet you at the park at 3.”

3. Ghosted

When someone abruptly stops responding to messages or calls, cutting off all communication.

  • For example, “I thought we were hitting it off, but then he ghosted me.”
  • If a friend hasn’t replied in a while, you might ask, “Did they ghost you?”
  • A person might complain, “I hate it when people ghost without any explanation.”

4. Salty

Used to describe someone who is upset, angry, or annoyed.

  • For instance, “He got really salty after losing the game.”
  • If someone is being rude, you might say, “Why are you so salty?”
  • A friend might joke, “Don’t get salty just because I beat you in that argument.”

5. On point

Refers to something that is perfect, accurate, or of high quality.

  • For example, “Her presentation was on point, she covered all the important details.”
  • If someone compliments your outfit, you can respond with, “Thanks, I try to keep my style on point.”
  • A friend might say, “Your cooking skills are on point, this meal is delicious.”

6. Woke

This term refers to being socially and politically aware, particularly regarding issues of social justice and inequality. It often implies a level of understanding and consciousness that goes beyond the mainstream.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m trying to stay woke and educate myself about systemic racism.”
  • In a discussion about feminism, a person might comment, “Being woke means acknowledging and challenging gender inequalities.”
  • Another might say, “Woke individuals actively seek to dismantle oppressive systems and promote equality.”

7. Goat

This acronym is used to describe someone who is considered the best in their field or the greatest of all time. It is often used in sports to refer to exceptional athletes.

  • For instance, a fan might say, “Michael Jordan is the GOAT of basketball.”
  • In a debate about music, someone might argue, “Beyoncé is the GOAT of our generation.”
  • Another might comment, “Lionel Messi is undoubtedly the GOAT of soccer.”

8. Extra

This term is used to describe someone who is excessive or over-dramatic in their actions or behavior. It can also refer to someone who goes above and beyond what is expected or necessary.

  • For example, if someone is wearing a flashy outfit, you might say, “They’re always so extra with their fashion choices.”
  • In a discussion about party planning, someone might comment, “She went extra and hired a live band for her backyard barbecue.”
  • Another might say, “My roommate is always extra when it comes to cleaning. She spends hours scrubbing every corner of the apartment.”

9. Bae

This term is used as a term of endearment for a romantic partner or someone you deeply care about. It can also be used to refer to a close friend or someone you have a strong bond with.

  • For instance, someone might post a picture with their partner and caption it, “Date night with bae.”
  • In a conversation about friendships, someone might say, “My best friend is my bae. We’ve been through everything together.”
  • Another might comment, “I can always count on my bae to support me and make me laugh.”

10. OK, boomer

This phrase is used to dismiss or disregard the opinions or ideas of older generations, particularly the baby boomer generation. It is often used to express frustration or disagreement with outdated viewpoints.

  • For example, if someone makes a comment about how technology is ruining society, a younger person might respond with, “OK, boomer.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might say, “Instead of taking action, they just say ‘OK, boomer’ and ignore the problem.”
  • Another might comment, “The phrase ‘OK, boomer’ has become a symbol of generational tension and a call for change.”

11. Triggered

When someone is “triggered,” it means that they have had a strong emotional reaction to something that reminds them of a traumatic or distressing experience.

  • For example, if someone has a fear of spiders and sees a picture of a spider, they might say, “That picture triggered me.”
  • In a heated argument, someone might say, “Don’t say that, it triggers me.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “I’m triggered” to express that they are feeling upset or overwhelmed by a certain situation.

12. Shook

When someone is “shook,” it means that they are deeply surprised, disturbed, or affected by something.

  • For instance, if someone witnesses a shocking event, they might say, “I am shook.”
  • If someone hears a surprising piece of news, they might exclaim, “I can’t believe it, I’m shook.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “That story really shook me” to express that they were deeply disturbed by something they heard or experienced.

13. Sketchy

When something is described as “sketchy,” it means that it is suspicious, questionable, or unreliable.

  • For example, if someone offers a deal that seems too good to be true, someone might say, “That sounds sketchy.”
  • If someone tells a story that doesn’t quite add up, a person might say, “That’s a bit sketchy, don’t you think?”
  • A person might use the phrase, “I don’t trust that person, they seem sketchy” to express their suspicion or concern about someone’s character or actions.

14. FOMO

FOMO stands for “Fear of Missing Out,” and it refers to the anxiety or unease that comes from the fear of not being included or missing out on social events or experiences.

  • For instance, if someone sees pictures of their friends at a party they weren’t invited to, they might say, “I have major FOMO.”
  • If someone declines an invitation to a concert and later sees videos of the amazing performance, they might exclaim, “I’m feeling the FOMO now.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “I hate having FOMO, I always feel like I’m missing out” to express their unease or disappointment about not being included in certain activities.

15. Yikes

When someone says “yikes,” it is often used as an expression of concern, surprise, or discomfort in response to something that is perceived as negative or unpleasant.

  • For example, if someone hears a disturbing or alarming story, they might say, “Yikes, that’s scary.”
  • If someone sees a person make a mistake, they might exclaim, “Yikes, that was a big blunder.”
  • A person might use the phrase, “Yikes, that situation looks dangerous” to express their concern or discomfort about a certain situation.

16. Cringe

This term is used to describe something that is awkward, embarrassing, or makes you feel uncomfortable. It can refer to a situation, behavior, or even a person.

  • For example, “That video of the guy dancing badly made me cringe.”
  • A person might say, “I can’t watch horror movies because they make me cringe.”
  • Someone might comment, “His cheesy pickup lines are so cringe-worthy.”

17. Facepalm

This slang term is used to describe a gesture where you place your hand on your face, typically the forehead, in response to something foolish, embarrassing, or frustrating.

  • For instance, “When he said that, I couldn’t help but facepalm.”
  • A person might comment, “I facepalmed when I saw the spelling mistakes in that email.”
  • Another might say, “His joke was so bad, it made me facepalm.”

18. Side-eye

This term refers to a facial expression where you glance at someone out of the corner of your eye, often indicating suspicion, doubt, or disapproval.

  • For example, “When she made that outrageous claim, I gave her a side-eye.”
  • A person might say, “I gave him a side-eye when he said he won the lottery.”
  • Another might comment, “Her constant bragging deserves a side-eye.”

19. Shady

This slang term is used to describe something or someone that is suspicious, untrustworthy, or questionable in nature.

  • For instance, “I heard some shady rumors about that company.”
  • A person might say, “His behavior was so shady, I didn’t want to be around him.”
  • Another might comment, “The deal seemed too good to be true, so I thought it was shady.”

20. Red flag

This term is used to describe a warning sign or indication that something is not right or may be a cause for concern.

  • For example, “When he started asking for my personal information on the first date, it was a red flag.”
  • A person might say, “If someone is constantly checking your phone, that’s a major red flag.”
  • Another might comment, “When a company refuses to provide clear answers, it raises red flags.”

21. Tinfoil hat

This term refers to someone who is excessively suspicious or believes in conspiracy theories. It originates from the idea that wearing a hat made of tinfoil can protect against mind control or surveillance.

  • For example, “He’s always wearing a tinfoil hat and talking about government conspiracies.”
  • In a discussion about conspiracy theories, someone might say, “I don’t buy into all that tinfoil hat stuff.”
  • Another might comment, “People who wear tinfoil hats are often seen as eccentric or delusional.”

22. Fishy

When something seems suspicious or not quite right, it can be described as “fishy.” This slang term implies that there may be something hidden or deceptive.

  • For instance, “The whole situation just feels fishy to me.”
  • In a conversation about a questionable business deal, someone might say, “There’s something fishy going on behind the scenes.”
  • Another might comment, “If it looks fishy and smells fishy, it’s probably fishy.”

23. Dodgy

This term is used to describe something that is questionable, unreliable, or suspicious. It can refer to a person, situation, or object.

  • For example, “I wouldn’t trust that guy, he seems really dodgy.”
  • In a discussion about a shady neighborhood, someone might say, “It’s best to avoid that area, it’s pretty dodgy.”
  • Another might comment, “The website looks dodgy, I wouldn’t enter my credit card information.”

24. Alarm bells

When something raises concerns or triggers a sense of danger, it can be described as “setting off alarm bells.” This phrase implies that there are warning signs that should not be ignored.

  • For instance, “The strange behavior of that person is setting off alarm bells.”
  • In a conversation about a potentially fraudulent email, someone might say, “The request for personal information raised alarm bells.”
  • Another might comment, “If your gut is telling you something is wrong, listen to those alarm bells.”

25. Worried sick

When someone is extremely worried or anxious about something, they can be described as “worried sick.” This phrase emphasizes the level of concern and the impact it has on a person’s well-being.

  • For example, “I’ve been worried sick about my missing dog.”
  • In a discussion about a loved one’s health, someone might say, “I’ve been worried sick ever since they got the diagnosis.”
  • Another might comment, “The constant stress at work is making me worried sick.”

26. Freaking out

This phrase is used to describe a state of extreme worry or anxiety. It indicates a high level of concern or stress.

  • For example, “I’m freaking out about my final exams.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s freaking out because she lost her phone.”
  • In a stressful situation, a person might exclaim, “I’m freaking out, I don’t know what to do!”

27. On edge

This slang phrase is used to describe a state of heightened tension or nervousness. It implies a sense of unease or concern.

  • For instance, “I’ve been on edge ever since I heard about the break-in.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m on edge waiting for the results of my job interview.”
  • In a suspenseful situation, a person might comment, “The suspense is really putting me on edge.”

28. Nervous wreck

This slang term refers to a person who is in a state of extreme anxiety or worry. It implies that the person is highly stressed or concerned about something.

  • For example, “I’m a nervous wreck before every big presentation.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s a nervous wreck whenever she has to fly.”
  • In a high-pressure situation, a person might comment, “I feel like a nervous wreck right now.”

29. Anxious

This word is used to describe a state of worry or unease. It indicates a general feeling of concern or nervousness.

  • For instance, “I’m feeling anxious about the upcoming deadline.”
  • Someone might say, “He’s always anxious before a job interview.”
  • In a difficult situation, a person might comment, “I’m anxious about making the right decision.”

30. Uneasy

This term is used to describe a state of discomfort or unease. It implies a sense of concern or uncertainty.

  • For example, “I felt uneasy walking alone at night.”
  • Someone might say, “She’s been feeling uneasy about the recent changes at work.”
  • In a suspicious situation, a person might comment, “Something about this situation makes me feel uneasy.”

31. Disturbed

Feeling agitated, upset, or emotionally unsettled.

  • For example, “I was disturbed by the violent scene in the movie.”
  • Someone might say, “I feel disturbed by the recent news of environmental destruction.”
  • Another person might express, “Her behavior is really disturbing, I’m concerned about her well-being.”

32. Troubled

Feeling anxious or concerned about something.

  • For instance, “He seems troubled by his financial situation.”
  • A person might say, “I’m troubled by the lack of action on climate change.”
  • Another might express, “She has a troubled past, but she’s working on turning her life around.”

33. Perturbed

Feeling annoyed, bothered, or disturbed.

  • For example, “I was perturbed by the constant interruptions during the meeting.”
  • Someone might say, “His comments really perturbed me, they were insensitive.”
  • Another person might express, “I’m perturbed by the lack of communication from my boss.”

34. Unease

A feeling of discomfort or uneasiness, often related to worry or concern.

  • For instance, “There was an unease in the room as the tension grew.”
  • A person might say, “I have a sense of unease about the upcoming election.”
  • Another might express, “She felt a growing unease as she walked alone in the dark.”

35. Apprehensive

Feeling anxious or uneasy about something that may happen.

  • For example, “I’m apprehensive about speaking in public.”
  • Someone might say, “She was apprehensive about starting a new job.”
  • Another person might express, “He felt apprehensive about the upcoming exam.”

36. Jittery

Feeling uneasy or anxious, often resulting in shaky movements or restlessness.

  • For example, “I have a big presentation tomorrow and I’m feeling really jittery.”
  • A person experiencing caffeine withdrawal might say, “I haven’t had my morning coffee and I’m feeling jittery.”
  • Someone might describe their pre-date nerves by saying, “I always get jittery before going on a first date.”

37. Panicky

Feeling a sudden and intense sense of fear or anxiety, often leading to irrational thoughts or actions.

  • For instance, “I lost my wallet and started panicking, thinking it was stolen.”
  • A person with claustrophobia might feel panicky in a crowded elevator.
  • Someone who is afraid of flying might experience panicky feelings before boarding a plane.
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38. Stressed out

Feeling a high level of mental or emotional strain due to pressure, demands, or difficult circumstances.

  • For example, “I have so much work to do, I’m really stressed out.”
  • A student might say, “I’m stressed out about my upcoming exams.”
  • A person dealing with a difficult personal situation might feel stressed out and say, “I can’t handle all this stress right now.”

39. Fretting

Feeling uneasy or concerned about something, often accompanied by repetitive or obsessive thoughts.

  • For instance, “I’m fretting about whether I made the right decision.”
  • A parent might fret over their child’s safety when they are out late at night.
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been fretting about this upcoming job interview for days.”

40. Anxious wreck

Feeling overwhelmingly anxious or stressed to the point of being unable to function properly.

  • For example, “I’m so worried about this test, I’m an anxious wreck.”
  • A person with social anxiety might feel like an anxious wreck in large social gatherings.
  • Someone might describe their pre-performance nerves by saying, “I always turn into an anxious wreck before going on stage.”

41. Worry

– For example, “I can’t help but worry about my upcoming exam.”

  • A parent might say, “Don’t worry, everything will be fine.”
  • In a conversation about a friend’s health, someone might ask, “Are you worried about their condition?”

42. Fret

– For instance, “She tends to fret over every little detail.”

  • A person might say, “I fret about my future constantly.”
  • In a discussion about work stress, someone might comment, “I try not to fret about things I can’t control.”

43. Stress

– For example, “I’m feeling a lot of stress at work right now.”

  • A student might say, “Exams always bring on a lot of stress.”
  • In a conversation about personal relationships, someone might mention, “Dealing with family drama can be a major source of stress.”

44. Alarm

– For instance, “The news of the impending storm caused great alarm.”

  • A person might say, “Her sudden disappearance set off alarm bells.”
  • In a discussion about cybersecurity, someone might warn, “The increasing number of data breaches should be a cause for alarm.”

45. Distress

– For example, “The loss of a loved one can cause immense distress.”

  • A person might say, “I’m in distress over the state of the world.”
  • In a conversation about financial difficulties, someone might mention, “Many families are experiencing financial distress due to the pandemic.”

46. Anxiety

Anxiety refers to a feeling of unease, such as fear or apprehension, that can be accompanied by physical symptoms like increased heart rate or difficulty breathing. It is often used to describe a general sense of concern or nervousness.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have so much anxiety about giving a presentation.”
  • Another person might say, “I struggle with anxiety in social situations.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling any anxiety about the upcoming exam?”

47. Apprehension

Apprehension is a feeling of anxiety or fear about something that may happen in the future. It is often used to describe a sense of unease or concern.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I feel a sense of apprehension about starting a new job.”
  • Another person might say, “There is a lot of apprehension in the air before a big game.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you have any apprehension about traveling alone?”

48. Nervousness

Nervousness refers to a state of being uneasy or anxious, often accompanied by physical symptoms like sweating or trembling. It is a common slang term used to describe a feeling of concern or worry.

  • For example, someone might say, “I always get nervous before a job interview.”
  • Another person might say, “I have a lot of nervousness about speaking in public.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you experience any nervousness before a big test?”

49. Disquiet

Disquiet is a state of unease or restlessness, often accompanied by a sense of worry or concern. It is a slang term used to describe a feeling of discomfort or anxiety.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I can’t shake this feeling of disquiet.”
  • Another person might say, “There is a sense of disquiet in the air before a major storm.”
  • A friend might ask, “Do you feel any disquiet about the upcoming event?”

50. Trepidation

Trepidation is a feeling of fear or anxiety about something that may happen in the future. It is often used to describe a sense of concern or unease.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a lot of trepidation about starting a new job.”
  • Another person might say, “There is a sense of trepidation in the air before a big performance.”
  • A friend might ask, “Are you feeling any trepidation about the upcoming trip?”

51. Jitters

This term refers to a feeling of unease or nervousness, often accompanied by trembling or shaking. “Jitters” is commonly used to describe a state of anxiety or anticipation.

  • For example, before a big performance, a musician might say, “I always get the jitters right before I go on stage.”
  • A person about to give a presentation might admit, “I have a case of the jitters, but I’ll do my best.”
  • Someone experiencing anxiety might say, “I can’t get rid of these jitters, no matter what I do.”

52. Angst

Angst refers to a feeling of deep anxiety or dread, often associated with a sense of existential unease or dissatisfaction. It is a term commonly used to describe a state of emotional turmoil or inner conflict.

  • For instance, a teenager might say, “I’m filled with angst about my future.”
  • A person going through a midlife crisis might confess, “I’m experiencing a lot of angst about where my life is headed.”
  • A character in a novel might be described as having a perpetual sense of angst.
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53. Discomfort

Discomfort refers to a state of physical or emotional unease or distress. It is a broad term that can encompass a range of sensations, from mild irritation to intense pain or distress.

  • For example, someone with an injury might say, “I’m experiencing a lot of discomfort in my knee.”
  • A person in an uncomfortable social situation might admit, “I’m feeling a lot of discomfort in this conversation.”
  • A patient at the dentist’s office might express, “I’m feeling a great deal of discomfort during this procedure.”

54. Perturbation

Perturbation refers to a state of being disturbed or unsettled. It is often used to describe a feeling of unease or anxiety caused by something unexpected or unsettling.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I was filled with perturbation when I heard the news.”
  • A character in a horror movie might experience a sense of perturbation in a creepy setting.
  • A person going through a difficult time might express, “I’m feeling a lot of perturbation about the future.”

55. Preoccupation

Preoccupation refers to a state of being absorbed or deeply engrossed in a particular thought, idea, or activity. It often implies a sense of distraction or fixation on a specific concern.

  • For example, a student might say, “I have a preoccupation with getting good grades.”
  • A person in a new relationship might confess, “I’m preoccupied with thoughts of my partner.”
  • Someone with a lot on their mind might admit, “I have a preoccupation with work right now.”

56. Tension

A feeling of unease or strain, often caused by a conflict or disagreement. “Tension” can also refer to a stressful or anxious atmosphere.

  • For example, “There was tension in the room as the two sides argued.”
  • A person might say, “I can feel the tension between them whenever they’re in the same room.”
  • In a discussion about a high-stakes competition, someone might comment, “The tension is palpable as the final round approaches.”

57. Misgiving

A feeling of doubt or hesitation, often based on a lack of confidence or trust. “Misgiving” can also refer to a sense of foreboding or unease about a particular situation.

  • For instance, “I have misgivings about accepting this job offer.”
  • A person might say, “I had a lot of misgivings about going on that blind date.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might comment, “Many people have misgivings about the new policy.”

58. Dismay

A feeling of shock, disappointment, or distress. “Dismay” often arises from an unexpected or unwelcome event or realization.

  • For example, “She looked at the damage with dismay.”
  • A person might say, “I felt a sense of dismay when I heard the news.”
  • In a discussion about a failed project, someone might comment, “There was a collective sense of dismay among the team.”

59. Insecurity

A feeling of uncertainty, self-doubt, or lack of confidence. “Insecurity” often arises from a fear of judgment or rejection.

  • For instance, “She struggled with feelings of insecurity about her appearance.”
  • A person might say, “His constant need for validation is a sign of deep-seated insecurity.”
  • In a discussion about imposter syndrome, someone might comment, “Many high-achieving individuals experience feelings of insecurity.”

60. Doubt

A feeling of uncertainty or skepticism about something. “Doubt” can also refer to a lack of trust or confidence in someone or something.

  • For example, “I have serious doubts about his ability to deliver on his promises.”
  • A person might say, “I’m filled with doubt about whether I made the right decision.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial theory, someone might comment, “There are many doubts surrounding the validity of this hypothesis.”

61. Wary

Being wary means being cautious or on guard, especially in a situation that may be potentially dangerous or risky.

  • For example, “I’m wary of giving out personal information online.”
  • Someone might say, “Be wary of strangers offering you a deal that seems too good to be true.”
  • In a discussion about safety, a person might advise, “Always be wary of your surroundings and trust your instincts.”

62. Edginess

Edginess refers to a state of nervousness or unease, often caused by a sense of tension or anticipation.

  • For instance, “I have a lot of edginess before a big job interview.”
  • In a conversation about a suspenseful movie, someone might say, “The edginess kept me on the edge of my seat.”
  • A person might describe their feelings before a performance, “I always have a bit of edginess before going on stage.”

63. Concernment

Concernment refers to the level of importance or significance that something holds.

  • For example, “The concernment of this issue cannot be overstated.”
  • In a discussion about priorities, someone might say, “We need to prioritize the concernment of this project.”
  • A person might emphasize the concernment of a decision by saying, “The concernment of choosing the right path cannot be underestimated.”

64. Solicitude

Solicitude refers to a state of care, concern, or attentiveness towards someone or something.

  • For instance, “His solicitude for his family is evident in his actions.”
  • In a conversation about relationships, someone might say, “Showing solicitude towards your partner is essential for a healthy relationship.”
  • A person might express their appreciation for someone’s solicitude by saying, “Thank you for your constant solicitude and support.”

65. Foreboding

Foreboding refers to a strong sense of impending doom or a feeling that something bad is about to happen.

  • For example, “A feeling of foreboding hung in the air before the storm.”
  • In a discussion about a suspenseful book, someone might say, “The author created a sense of foreboding throughout the story.”
  • A person might describe their unease by saying, “I can’t shake this sense of foreboding, like something terrible is going to happen.”

66. Disquietude

Disquietude refers to a feeling of unease or anxiety. It is often used to describe a sense of restlessness or disturbance.

  • For example, “She couldn’t shake the disquietude she felt after hearing the news.”
  • A person might express their disquietude by saying, “I have a sense of disquietude about the upcoming event.”
  • In a discussion about a troubling situation, someone might comment, “The disquietude in the room was palpable.”

67. Cause for alarm

When something is a cause for alarm, it means it is a reason to be concerned or worried. It implies that the situation is serious or could potentially have negative consequences.

  • For instance, “The sudden increase in crime rates is a cause for alarm.”
  • A person might say, “The recent outbreak of a contagious disease is definitely a cause for alarm.”
  • In a discussion about climate change, someone might argue, “The rising sea levels are a cause for alarm and should be addressed immediately.”

68. Worrisome

Worrisome is an adjective used to describe something that causes worry or concern. It suggests that the situation or issue is troubling or unsettling.

  • For example, “The worrisome news about the economy has everyone on edge.”
  • A person might express their worries by saying, “I find it worrisome that we haven’t heard from him in days.”
  • In a conversation about a potential health risk, someone might comment, “The increasing number of cases is definitely worrisome.”

69. Troubling

Troubling is an adjective that describes something that is causing distress or concern. It implies that the situation or issue is unsettling or bothersome.

  • For instance, “The troubling behavior of the suspect raised red flags.”
  • A person might express their concern by saying, “It’s troubling to see the decline in environmental conservation efforts.”
  • In a discussion about social issues, someone might argue, “The high poverty rates in our country are deeply troubling.”

70. Disturbing

Disturbing is an adjective that describes something that is causing emotional or mental discomfort. It suggests that the situation or issue is unsettling or deeply upsetting.

  • For example, “The disturbing images from the crime scene left a lasting impact.”
  • A person might say, “I find it deeply disturbing that such injustice still exists in our society.”
  • In a conversation about a disturbing movie, someone might comment, “The film was intentionally designed to be unsettling and disturbing.”

71. Nerve-wracking

This term is used to describe a situation or experience that causes extreme nervousness or tension.

  • For example, “Waiting to hear back from the job interview was nerve-wracking.”
  • A person might say, “Watching a horror movie alone at night can be nerve-wracking.”
  • Another might describe a roller coaster ride as “nerve-wracking but exhilarating.”
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72. Hair-raising

This slang term is used to describe something that is incredibly scary or shocking.

  • For instance, “The haunted house was filled with hair-raising surprises.”
  • A person might say, “The car accident was a hair-raising experience.”
  • Another might describe a thrilling adventure as “a hair-raising ride.”

73. Creepy

This word is used to describe something or someone that gives off an eerie or uncomfortable vibe.

  • For example, “The abandoned house had a creepy atmosphere.”
  • A person might say, “That old doll gives me the creeps.”
  • Another might describe a suspicious person as “creepy.”

74. Spooky

This slang term is used to describe something that is unsettling or gives off a ghostly or supernatural vibe.

  • For instance, “Walking through the graveyard at night was spooky.”
  • A person might say, “The horror movie had some really spooky scenes.”
  • Another might describe a strange noise as “spooky.”

75. Unsettling

This term is used to describe something that makes a person feel uneasy or disturbed.

  • For example, “The news of the recent crime wave was unsettling.”
  • A person might say, “The eerie silence in the abandoned building was unsettling.”
  • Another might describe a disturbing painting as “unsettling.”

76. Perturbing

This word is used to describe something that causes anxiety, unease, or worry. It suggests that something is unsettling or bothersome.

  • For example, “The news of the recent natural disaster was perturbing.”
  • A person might say, “The constant noise from the construction site is perturbing.”
  • Another might express, “The perturbing behavior of the suspect raised suspicions among the neighbors.”

77. Unnerving

This word is used to describe something that makes someone feel anxious, uneasy, or uncomfortable. It implies a sense of unease or fear.

  • For instance, “The horror movie was so unnerving that I couldn’t sleep.”
  • A person might say, “The sudden loud noise was unnerving and made me jump.”
  • Another might express, “Walking alone in a dark alley at night can be unnerving.”

78. Disconcerting

This word is used to describe something that causes confusion, discomfort, or unease. It suggests that something is unexpected or throws someone off balance.

  • For example, “The disconcerting silence after the argument made everyone uncomfortable.”
  • A person might say, “The disconcerting news of the company’s bankruptcy shocked the employees.”
  • Another might express, “The disconcerting behavior of the child concerned the teacher.”

79. Alarming

This word is used to describe something that causes fear, concern, or unease. It implies that something is potentially dangerous or threatening.

  • For instance, “The alarming increase in crime rates is a cause for concern.”
  • A person might say, “The alarming symptoms prompted her to see a doctor immediately.”
  • Another might express, “The alarming news of the impending storm led to mass evacuations.”

80. Distressing

This word is used to describe something that causes sadness, discomfort, or emotional pain. It implies that something is deeply troubling or distressing.

  • For example, “The distressing news of the accident left everyone in shock.”
  • A person might say, “The distressing images from the war zone were difficult to watch.”
  • Another might express, “The distressing situation of homelessness in the city calls for immediate action.”

81. Troublesome

This word describes something or someone that causes difficulty or annoyance. It implies that the situation or person is causing concern or worry.

  • For example, “That troublesome neighbor always parks in front of my driveway.”
  • A person might say, “I have a troublesome relationship with my boss.”
  • Another might complain, “This computer program is so troublesome, it keeps crashing.”

82. Agitating

This word describes something that causes annoyance or irritation. It suggests that the situation or person is causing agitation or unease.

  • For instance, “It’s so agitating when people talk loudly on their phones in public.”
  • A person might say, “I find the constant noise outside my window agitating.”
  • Another might complain, “The agitating sound of construction work is driving me crazy.”

83. Upsetting

This word describes something that causes emotional distress or discomfort. It indicates that the situation or person is causing sadness, anger, or worry.

  • For example, “The news of the accident was very upsetting.”
  • A person might say, “I find it upsetting when people are rude to others.”
  • Another might express, “It’s so upsetting to see the destruction caused by natural disasters.”

84. Anxious-making

This word describes something that causes anxiety or unease. It suggests that the situation or person is causing worry or concern.

  • For instance, “The thought of public speaking is anxious-making for many people.”
  • A person might say, “The uncertainty of the future is anxious-making.”
  • Another might express, “The constant noise in the city is anxious-making for me.”

85. Stressful

This word describes something that causes stress or strain. It implies that the situation or person is causing mental or emotional pressure.

  • For example, “Working long hours in a high-pressure job can be very stressful.”
  • A person might say, “Moving to a new city can be a stressful experience.”
  • Another might complain, “Dealing with traffic every day is so stressful.”

86. Nervous-making

This term refers to something that makes a person feel nervous or anxious. It describes a situation or event that causes concern or worry.

  • For example, “That roller coaster looks nervous-making, but I still want to try it.”
  • If someone is hesitant to do something, they might say, “I find public speaking nervous-making.”
  • A person might comment, “The thought of flying alone is nervous-making for me.”

87. Frightening

This word is used to describe something that causes fear or fright. It indicates a situation or object that is alarming or terrifying.

  • For instance, “The horror movie was so frightening that I couldn’t sleep.”
  • If someone encounters a dangerous animal, they might say, “That snake is really frightening.”
  • A person might express, “Walking alone in a dark alley is always a frightening experience.”

88. Panic-inducing

This term describes something that triggers a sudden feeling of panic or intense fear. It signifies a situation or event that causes extreme distress or anxiety.

  • For example, “The loud noise was panic-inducing, and everyone started running.”
  • If someone has a fear of heights, they might say, “Climbing a tall ladder is panic-inducing for me.”
  • A person might comment, “Being in a crowded space with no way out is panic-inducing.”

89. Intimidating

This word is used to describe something or someone that makes a person feel nervous or uneasy. It suggests a situation or person that is challenging or difficult to approach.

  • For instance, “The large and aggressive dog was intimidating, and I didn’t want to get too close.”
  • If someone is hesitant to confront a boss, they might say, “The meeting with the CEO is intimidating.”
  • A person might express, “Entering a new school can be intimidating for a shy student.”

90. Menacing

This term refers to something that appears dangerous or suggestive of harm. It indicates a situation or person that poses a potential threat or danger.

  • For example, “The dark clouds and strong winds were menacing, signaling an approaching storm.”
  • If someone encounters a person with a weapon, they might say, “The man’s aggressive behavior was menacing.”
  • A person might comment, “Walking alone at night in a rough neighborhood can be menacing.”

91. Ominous

Something that gives a feeling of impending danger or evil. It suggests that something bad is about to happen or that there is a threat present.

  • For example, “The dark clouds and thunder were ominous signs of an approaching storm.”
  • A person might say, “The eerie silence in the abandoned house gave me an ominous feeling.”
  • In a horror movie, a character might describe a haunted house as, “The place had an ominous atmosphere, as if something sinister lurked within.”

92. Disquieting

Something that causes feelings of unease, worry, or discomfort. It implies a sense of restlessness or agitation.

  • For instance, “The strange noises coming from the basement were disquieting.”
  • A person might say, “The disquieting news about the rising crime rates in the neighborhood is concerning.”
  • In a suspenseful novel, the author might create a disquieting scene to keep the readers on edge.