Top 25 Slang For Hockey – Meaning & Usage

Hockey, the fast-paced and adrenaline-pumping sport, has its own unique language that can sometimes leave newcomers feeling a bit lost. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered. Our team of hockey enthusiasts have scoured the rinks and locker rooms to bring you a list of the top slang terms used in the world of hockey. So lace up your skates and get ready to dive into this slapshot of slang that will have you speaking the language of the game in no time!

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1. Chirp

In hockey, “chirping” refers to the act of trash talking or taunting opponents on the ice. It involves using witty or insulting remarks to try and get under the skin of the opposing players.

  • For example, a player might chirp an opponent by saying, “You couldn’t score if the net was empty!”
  • During a heated game, players might engage in chirping matches, trading insults back and forth.
  • A commentator might mention, “The chirping between these two teams has reached a fever pitch.”

2. Dangle

In hockey, “dangle” is a term used to describe a player’s ability to perform skilled stickhandling moves to get past opponents. It refers to the act of deking or maneuvering the puck around opposing players with finesse.

  • For instance, a player might say, “Did you see that dangle? I completely fooled the defenseman!”
  • A highlight reel might showcase a player’s impressive dangle, where they skillfully navigate through multiple defenders.
  • Commentators might praise a player’s dangle by saying, “His stickhandling ability is unmatched. He can dangle through any defense.”

3. Snipe

In hockey, “snipe” refers to scoring a goal with a well-placed and accurate shot. It is often used to describe a shot that finds the top corners of the net, beating the goaltender.

  • For example, a player might exclaim, “I sniped that shot right over the goalie’s shoulder!”
  • Commentators might say, “He’s known for his sniping ability. He can pick the corners with ease.”
  • A highlight reel might feature a player’s impressive snipe, showcasing their precise shooting skills.

4. Sauce

In hockey, “sauce” is a term used to describe a floating pass that travels through the air, just above the ice surface. It is used to avoid defenders’ sticks and make it easier for the receiving player to handle the puck.

  • For instance, a player might say, “I sauced a pass right onto his tape for an easy goal.”
  • Commentators might mention, “That saucer pass was perfectly executed. It glided right onto the stick of his teammate.”
  • A coach might instruct their players, “Try to sauce the puck over the defender’s stick for a clean pass.”

5. Bar down

In hockey, “bar down” refers to a shot that hits the crossbar and goes into the net, resulting in a goal. It is considered a skillful and impressive way to score.

  • For example, a player might celebrate by saying, “I went bar down with that shot!”
  • Commentators might describe a goal as, “He roofed it, bar down. That’s a highlight-reel goal.”
  • Fans might chant, “Bar down! Bar down!” after a player scores with a shot that hits the crossbar and goes in.
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6. Flow

In hockey, “flow” refers to a player’s long and flowing hair, typically seen sticking out from under their helmet. It is a term used to describe a player’s hairstyle, often associated with a laid-back and cool persona.

  • For example, “Check out that player’s flow, it’s so long and stylish!”
  • A fan might comment, “I wish I had flow like that hockey player.”
  • During a game, a commentator might say, “He’s got great flow, it’s flying as he skates.”

7. Wheel

To “wheel” in hockey means to skate quickly and smoothly. It refers to a player’s ability to move swiftly on the ice, often with the puck.

  • For instance, “He’s really wheeling down the ice, no one can catch up to him!”
  • A coach might instruct their team, “Keep your feet moving and wheel to create scoring opportunities.”
  • During a game, a commentator might say, “He’s showing off his speed with some impressive wheeling.”

8. Biscuit

In hockey, “biscuit” is a slang term for the puck. It is a playful and lighthearted way to refer to the game object.

  • For example, “He’s got control of the biscuit, looking for a pass.”
  • A fan might shout, “Shoot that biscuit into the net!”
  • During a game, a commentator might say, “The biscuit is bouncing all over the place, making it difficult for the goaltender.”

9. Sauce boss

A “sauce boss” in hockey is a player who has exceptional passing skills. They are able to make accurate and smooth passes, often with a saucer pass technique where the puck glides through the air.

  • For instance, “He’s a real sauce boss, always setting up his teammates with perfect passes.”
  • A commentator might say, “Watch out for that player, he’s a real sauce boss when it comes to distributing the puck.”
  • Fans might cheer, “Pass it to the sauce boss, he’ll make something happen!”

10. Bender

In hockey, a “bender” is a term used to describe an inexperienced or unskilled player. It is often used in a derogatory manner to mock someone’s lack of skill or ability on the ice.

  • For example, “He’s such a bender, he can barely skate.”
  • A player might insult an opponent by saying, “You’re nothing but a bender, you don’t belong on this ice.”
  • During a game, a fan might yell, “Get off the ice, you bender!”

11. Celly

This term refers to a player’s celebration after scoring a goal. It can include various gestures, dances, or actions to show excitement and joy.

  • For example, “After scoring, the player did a celly and jumped into the glass to celebrate with the fans.”
  • In a post-game interview, a player might say, “I couldn’t help but do a celly after that goal. It was a big moment for our team.”
  • A fan might comment on social media, “That celly was epic! The player really knows how to celebrate.”

12. Duster

This term is used to describe a player who is not skilled or effective on the ice. It implies that the player is “dusting” the bench with their lack of contribution.

  • For instance, a commentator might say, “He’s been a duster all game, unable to make any plays.”
  • During a game, a fan might yell, “Get that duster off the ice! He’s not doing anything.”
  • In a post-game analysis, an analyst might criticize a player, saying, “He’s been a duster for the entire season. The team needs to make changes.”

13. Gongshow

This term refers to a chaotic or disorderly situation on the ice. It can describe a game that is filled with fights, penalties, and overall mayhem.

  • For example, a commentator might say, “This game has turned into a gongshow with all the fights and penalties.”
  • During a heated moment in a game, a player might yell, “This is a gongshow! We need to calm down and focus.”
  • Fans might discuss a particularly intense game, saying, “Last night’s game was a total gongshow. It had everything – fights, goals, and drama.”

14. Grinder

This term is used to describe a player who is known for their hard work, determination, and physicality on the ice. A grinder often focuses on defensive play and winning battles along the boards.

  • For instance, a coach might say, “He’s a great grinder. He gives 100% effort every shift.”
  • During a game, a commentator might praise a player, saying, “He’s a key grinder for his team. He’s always battling for the puck.”
  • Fans might discuss the importance of a grinder on a team, saying, “Grinders may not score a lot of goals, but they bring a lot of energy and toughness to the game.”

15. Sauce it

This term refers to making a pass with a lot of speed, accuracy, and finesse. “Sauce” is slang for “sauce pass,” which is a pass that is elevated and travels through the air.

  • For example, a commentator might say, “He sauced it over the defender’s stick and right onto his teammate’s tape.”
  • During a game, a player might yell to their teammate, “Sauce it to me!” to request a high, skillful pass.
  • Fans might appreciate a well-executed sauce pass, saying, “That was a beautiful saucer! It set up a great scoring opportunity.”

16. Top cheese

In hockey, “top cheese” refers to scoring a goal by shooting the puck into the top part of the net, usually just under the crossbar. It is a term used to describe a well-placed shot that is difficult for the goalie to save.

  • For example, “He picked the top cheese with a perfect wrist shot.”
  • A commentator might say, “That was a beautiful top cheese goal.”
  • A player might celebrate a top cheese goal by saying, “I just went top cheese on that one!”

17. Beauty

In hockey, “beauty” is a term used to describe a player who is skilled, impressive, or talented. It is often used as a compliment to acknowledge a player’s abilities or performance.

  • For instance, “He’s a real beauty on the ice, always making great plays.”
  • A coach might say, “We need our beauties to step up and lead the team.”
  • Fans might cheer, “What a beauty goal!”

18. Dangle snipe celly

In hockey, “dangle snipe celly” is a phrase that combines three different slang terms. “Dangle” refers to performing a skilled move or deke to get past an opponent, “snipe” means to score a goal with a well-placed shot, and “celly” is short for celebration. Together, it describes the sequence of performing a skilled move, scoring a goal, and celebrating.

  • For example, “He dangled through the defense, sniped top cheese, and did a celly to celebrate.”
  • A commentator might say, “That was an incredible dangle snipe celly!”
  • Players might use the phrase to motivate each other, saying, “Let’s go out there and dangle snipe celly!”

19. Tendy

In hockey, “tendy” is a slang term used to refer to a goaltender. It is a shortened form of the word “tender,” which is another term for a goalie.

  • For instance, “Our tendy made some amazing saves in the game.”
  • A coach might say, “We need our tendy to be on top of their game tonight.”
  • Fans might chant, “Tendy! Tendy!” to show support for the goalie.
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20. Bardownski

In hockey, “bardownski” is a slang term used to describe scoring a goal by hitting the top crossbar of the net and having the puck go into the net. It is a term used to emphasize the accuracy and precision of the shot.

  • For example, “He went bardownski with a wicked slapshot.”
  • A commentator might say, “That was a perfect bardownski goal!”
  • Players might use the term to challenge each other, saying, “Let’s see who can go bardownski first!”

21. Barn

In hockey slang, “barn” refers to the net or goal. It is often used to describe scoring a goal.

  • For example, “He sniped top shelf and put it in the barn.”
  • A commentator might say, “That was a beautiful shot, right into the barn.”
  • A player celebrating a goal might shout, “I put it in the barn, boys!”

22. Mitts

In hockey slang, “mitts” refers to a player’s hands or their skill in stickhandling and shooting.

  • For instance, “He’s got some serious mitts, he can dangle through any defenseman.”
  • A commentator might say, “Look at the silky mitts on that player, he’s a real playmaker.”
  • A coach might praise a player’s skill by saying, “His mitts are a huge asset to our team.”

23. Selly

In hockey slang, “selly” is short for “celebration” and refers to a player’s post-goal celebration.

  • For example, “He did a sick selly after scoring, he really knows how to celebrate.”
  • A commentator might say, “That selly was full of style and flair, he knows how to celebrate a goal.”
  • A teammate might compliment a player’s celebration by saying, “Nice selly, man! You really know how to celebrate.”

24. Top cheddar

In hockey slang, “top cheddar” refers to the upper corners of the net, where players aim to score their goals.

  • For instance, “He sniped it top cheddar, right under the crossbar.”
  • A commentator might say, “That shot had some serious top cheddar, it was perfectly placed.”
  • A player might aim for top cheddar by saying, “I’m going to pick the top corner and go for some top cheddar.”

25. Five-hole

In hockey slang, “five-hole” refers to the space between the goalie’s legs, where players often aim to shoot and score.

  • For example, “He shot it through the goalie’s five-hole and scored.”
  • A commentator might say, “The goalie left his five-hole wide open and got scored on.”
  • A player might strategize by saying, “I’m going to deke the goalie and shoot through his five-hole.”