Top 50 Slang For In Short – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing ideas concisely, sometimes a simple phrase can do the trick. “In short” is one of those handy expressions that can sum things up quickly.

Our team has put together a list of alternative phrases that can help you get your point across efficiently. So, if you’re looking to spice up your vocabulary and communicate more effectively, stay tuned for our compilation of slang for “in short”.

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1. TL;DR

This acronym is used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or a post. It indicates that the person did not read the entire content, but is providing a brief summary or conclusion.

  • For example, “TL;DR: The article discusses the benefits of exercise for mental health.”
  • In a forum thread, a user might say, “TL;DR version: The movie is a must-watch for action fans.”
  • Another user might post, “TL;DR: The recipe calls for basic ingredients and takes only 30 minutes to make.”

2. TBH

This acronym is used to preface an honest or candid statement. It is often used to express an opinion or share personal thoughts.

  • For instance, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy the concert as much as I thought I would.”
  • In a comment thread, someone might say, “TBH, I find this show overrated.”
  • Another user might post, “TBH, I think the new restaurant in town is overpriced.”

3. FYI

This acronym is used to provide information or share something that may be useful or relevant to the recipient.

  • For example, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to next Monday.”
  • In an email, someone might write, “FYI, the report is due by the end of the week.”
  • A coworker might leave a note saying, “FYI, the printer is out of ink.”

4. IMHO

This acronym is used to express one’s personal opinion in a modest or humble manner.

  • For instance, “IMHO, this book is one of the best I’ve ever read.”
  • In a discussion thread, someone might say, “IMHO, the company should focus more on employee well-being.”
  • Another user might post, “IMHO, the movie adaptation did not do justice to the original book.”

5. AFAIK

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the person’s current knowledge or understanding.

  • For example, “AFAIK, the event is still scheduled for next week.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “AFAIK, the project is on track and will be completed by the deadline.”
  • Another user might comment, “AFAIK, the store closes at 9 PM on weekdays.”

6. IIRC

This is used when a person is not entirely certain about something but believes their memory to be accurate. It is often used to preface a statement or answer that may not be completely reliable.

  • For example, “IIRC, the meeting is scheduled for next Tuesday.”
  • In a discussion about a past event, someone might say, “IIRC, the concert was amazing.”
  • A user might comment, “IIRC, the book was set in the 19th century.”

7. BTW

This is a phrase used to introduce an additional or unrelated piece of information in a conversation or message. It is often used to provide context or add something extra to the current topic of discussion.

  • For instance, “BTW, did you hear about the new restaurant that opened downtown?”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to the store to pick up some groceries. BTW, do you need anything?”
  • In an online chat, someone might ask, “BTW, have you seen the latest episode of that show?”

8. IDC

This is an abbreviation used to express indifference or lack of interest in a particular matter or topic. It is often used to dismiss or downplay the importance of something.

  • For example, “IDC what we have for dinner, I’m not hungry.”
  • In a discussion about movie preferences, someone might say, “IDC which movie we watch, I’m open to anything.”
  • A person might comment, “IDC about the outcome of the game, I’m not a fan of either team.”

9. IDK

This is an abbreviation used to indicate a lack of knowledge or information about something. It is often used as a response to a question when the person is unsure of the answer.

  • For instance, “IDK where we’re meeting for lunch, I’ll have to check.”
  • In a conversation about a current event, someone might say, “IDK what the latest updates are, I haven’t been following the news.”
  • A user might comment, “IDK why they made that decision, it doesn’t make sense to me.”

10. TTYL

This is a phrase used to indicate that the person will speak or communicate with the recipient at a later time. It is often used as a farewell or goodbye in written or digital communication.

  • For example, “I have to go now, TTYL!”
  • In an online chat, someone might say, “I’ll be back online later, TTYL.”
  • A person might send a text message saying, “I’m busy right now, TTYL when I’m free.”

11. ICYMI

This acronym is used to bring attention to something that may have been missed or overlooked. It is often used when sharing a news article, video, or important information.

  • For example, “ICYMI, there’s a new episode of your favorite show on tonight!”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the new iPhone was released yesterday.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a sale happening at your favorite store this weekend.”

12. SMH

This acronym is used to express disbelief, disappointment, or disapproval. It is often used in response to something foolish, ridiculous, or frustrating.

  • For instance, “SMH, I can’t believe he said that.”
  • A user might comment, “SMH, people can be so ignorant sometimes.”
  • Another might say, “SMH, why would anyone do something like that?”

13. NVM

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something previously mentioned is no longer relevant or important. It is often used in online conversations or text messages.

  • For example, “NVM, I found what I was looking for.”
  • A user might reply, “NVM, I figured it out on my own.”
  • Another might say, “NVM, I changed my mind about going out tonight.”

14. LMK

This abbreviation is used to request information or ask someone to keep you informed. It is often used when making plans or seeking clarification.

  • For instance, “LMK if you’re free this weekend.”
  • A user might comment, “LMK if there are any updates on the situation.”
  • Another might say, “LMK what time works best for you.”

15. YMMV

This acronym is used to acknowledge that individual experiences may differ. It is often used when discussing personal opinions, preferences, or outcomes.

  • For example, “I loved that movie, but YMMV.”
  • A user might comment, “YMMV, but I found the product to be very effective.”
  • Another might say, “YMMV, but I had a great experience at that restaurant.”

16. BFF

This acronym is used to refer to a close friend or group of friends who are inseparable and have a strong bond. It is often used affectionately.

  • For example, “My BFF and I have known each other since kindergarten.”
  • When talking about a special friendship, someone might say, “We’ve been BFFs for years.”
  • In a social media post, a person might write, “Spending the day with my BFF, couldn’t be happier!”

17. ASAP

This abbreviation is used to indicate urgency. It means that something needs to be done or completed quickly or without delay.

  • For instance, “I need that report ASAP, the deadline is approaching.”
  • A boss might tell their employee, “Please finish this task ASAP.”
  • When making plans, someone might say, “Let’s meet up for dinner ASAP.”

18. IMO

This phrase is used to preface a statement or opinion, indicating that what follows is the speaker’s personal viewpoint.

  • For example, “IMO, this movie is the best of the year.”
  • When discussing a controversial topic, someone might say, “IMO, everyone should have access to affordable healthcare.”
  • In a comment thread, a user might write, “IMO, the new album is not as good as their previous work.”

19. ROFL

This acronym is used to express extreme amusement or laughter. It indicates that something is incredibly funny.

  • For instance, “That joke had me ROFL.”
  • When watching a hilarious video, someone might comment, “ROFL, I can’t stop laughing!”
  • In a chat conversation, a person might type, “That’s the funniest thing I’ve ever heard, ROFL!”

20. OMG

This expression is used to convey surprise, excitement, or disbelief. It is often used in response to something unexpected or extraordinary.

  • For example, “OMG, I can’t believe you won the lottery!”
  • When seeing a breathtaking view, someone might exclaim, “OMG, this is incredible!”
  • In a text message, a person might write, “OMG, you won’t believe what just happened!”

21. LOL

This acronym is used to indicate that something is funny or amusing. It is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, “That joke you told was hilarious, LOL!”
  • A person might respond to a funny meme with, “LOL, that’s so relatable.”
  • In a conversation about a funny video, someone might say, “I couldn’t stop laughing, LOL!”

22. BRB

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be temporarily leaving the conversation or activity, but will return shortly.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I need to grab a drink, BRB.”
  • During an online gaming session, someone might announce, “I have to answer the door, BRB.”
  • A person might use BRB in a group chat to let others know they need to take a quick break.
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23. YOLO

This phrase is used to express the idea that life is short and one should take risks and enjoy the present moment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going skydiving today, YOLO!”
  • A person might post a picture of themselves traveling and caption it with, “Exploring new places, YOLO.”
  • In a discussion about trying new experiences, someone might say, “You never know until you try, YOLO!”

24. RIP

This phrase is used to express condolences or to signify the death of someone.

  • For instance, a person might comment on a social media post about a deceased celebrity with, “RIP, they will be missed.”
  • In a conversation about a deceased loved one, someone might say, “RIP, they were an amazing person.”
  • A person might use RIP to express sadness over the loss of a pet, saying, “RIP, my furry friend.”

25. FOMO

This acronym is used to describe the feeling of anxiety or unease that one might miss out on something exciting or interesting happening.

  • For example, someone might say, “I can’t miss this party, FOMO is real.”
  • A person might explain their decision to attend an event by saying, “I didn’t want to experience FOMO.”
  • In a conversation about social media, someone might say, “FOMO is a common side effect of constantly seeing others’ highlight reels.”

26. GR8

This is a shorthand way of saying “great.” It is often used in casual conversations or online communication to express enthusiasm or approval.

  • For example, a person might say, “That movie was gr8!”
  • In a text message, someone might reply, “I’m gr8, thanks for asking!”
  • A social media post might read, “Just had a gr8 time at the beach!”

27. WBU

This is an abbreviation for “what about you.” It is commonly used in online conversations or text messages to ask someone for their opinion or response.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “I had a great day. WBU?”
  • In a group chat, a person might say, “I’m going to the party tonight. WBU?”
  • A social media post might ask, “Just finished this book. WBU? Any recommendations?”

28. TMI

This acronym is used to indicate that someone has shared more personal or detailed information than the listener wants or needs to know.

  • For example, if someone shares intimate details of their personal life, a friend might say, “TMI!”
  • In a conversation about medical conditions, someone might respond to excessive details with, “TMI, I don’t need to know all that.”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “TMI, keep some things private!”

29. HBU

This is an abbreviation for “how about you.” It is commonly used in online conversations or text messages to ask someone for their opinion or response.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “I’m going to the beach this weekend. HBU?”
  • In a group chat, a person might say, “I just finished my assignment. HBU?”
  • A social media post might ask, “Just tried this new restaurant. HBU? Any recommendations?”

30. GTG

This acronym is used to indicate that someone needs to leave or end a conversation or activity.

  • For example, if someone needs to leave a party, they might say, “GTG, it’s getting late.”
  • In a text message, someone might reply, “I’ll talk to you later, GTG!”
  • A person might comment on a social media post, “Looks fun, but I GTG. Have a great time!”

31. TBF

Used to introduce a statement that provides a fair or balanced perspective on a topic. It is often used to acknowledge a valid point or argument.

  • For example, “TBF, the movie had great special effects even though the plot was weak.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “TBF, both sides have valid arguments.”
  • Another user might comment, “TBF, I can understand why people are upset about the decision.”

32. OTOH

Used to introduce an alternative perspective or contrasting viewpoint. It is often used to present a different opinion or to consider different factors.

  • For instance, “The movie received mixed reviews. OTOH, some viewers really enjoyed it.”
  • In a debate about a political issue, someone might say, “One side argues for stricter regulations, while OTOH, others believe in individual freedom.”
  • Another user might comment, “I’m torn between two options. OTOH, one choice offers more stability, but the other offers more excitement.”

33. TL;DW

Used to summarize a lengthy video or content for those who didn’t watch it. It provides a brief overview or key points of the content.

  • For example, “TL;DW: The video explained the benefits of a plant-based diet.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “TL;DW: The film is a romantic comedy set in Paris.”
  • Another user might comment, “I don’t have time to watch the whole video. TL;DW, please!”

34. IANAL

Used to indicate that the person speaking is not a legal professional and their statement should not be considered legal advice. It is often used to preface a comment or opinion on a legal matter.

  • For instance, “IANAL, but it seems like a violation of the contract.”
  • In a discussion about a legal issue, someone might say, “IANAL, but I think you have a case based on the evidence.”
  • Another user might comment, “IANAL, but I believe that’s a breach of privacy.”

35. IANAD

Used to indicate that the person speaking is not a medical professional and their statement should not be considered medical advice. It is often used to preface a comment or opinion on a health-related matter.

  • For example, “IANAD, but it could be a symptom of dehydration.”
  • In a discussion about a medical condition, someone might say, “IANAD, but it might be worth getting a second opinion.”
  • Another user might comment, “IANAD, but I think you should consult a specialist for a proper diagnosis.”

36. IANADD

Used to preface a statement or opinion that is not based on professional medical knowledge or expertise. It is often used in online forums or discussions.

  • For example, “IANADD, but I think you should see a doctor if you’re experiencing those symptoms.”
  • A user might comment, “IANADD, but I heard drinking plenty of water can help with headaches.”
  • Another might say, “IANADD, but I found that stretching before exercise helps prevent muscle cramps.”

37. IANAE

Used to indicate that the speaker is not an authority or specialist on a particular subject. It is commonly used in online discussions or forums.

  • For instance, “IANAE, but I think the best way to learn a language is through immersion.”
  • A user might comment, “IANAE, but I believe the stock market is influenced by various factors.”
  • Another might say, “IANAE, but I’ve found that using natural remedies can help with allergies.”

38. IANARS

Used to express that the speaker does not possess advanced knowledge or expertise in a particular area. It is often used humorously or self-deprecatingly.

  • For example, “IANARS, but I think we should try turning it off and on again.”
  • A user might comment, “IANARS, but I believe the best way to make a cake is to follow the recipe.”
  • Another might say, “IANARS, but I’ve found that taking breaks during studying actually improves focus.”

39. Recap

To recap means to provide a brief summary or overview of something that has already been discussed or presented. It is often used to quickly remind or update someone on the main points or highlights of a previous conversation or event.

  • For example, at the end of a meeting, someone might say, “Let’s quickly recap what we’ve discussed today.”
  • In a TV show review, a critic might write, “To recap, the main character faced numerous challenges and ultimately triumphed.”
  • A teacher might say to their students, “Before we move on to the next topic, let’s do a quick recap of what we’ve learned so far.”

40. To sum up

To sum up means to provide a concise and condensed version of something. It is often used to give a brief overview or conclusion of a longer discussion, presentation, or argument.

  • For instance, during a debate, a participant might say, “To sum up my point, we need to prioritize environmental conservation.”
  • In a book review, a critic might write, “To sum up, this novel offers a thought-provoking exploration of human nature.”
  • A presenter might use the phrase to conclude their speech, saying, “To sum up, this project has the potential to revolutionize the industry.”

41. To put it simply

To put it simply means to express something in a clear and easily understandable way, without unnecessary complexity or detail. It is often used to break down complex ideas or concepts into simpler terms.

  • For example, when explaining a scientific theory, a teacher might say, “To put it simply, gravity is the force that attracts objects to one another.”
  • In a news article, a journalist might write, “To put it simply, the new tax policy will benefit low-income families.”
  • A friend might use the phrase to explain a movie plot, saying, “To put it simply, the main character is on a quest to find a lost treasure.”

42. To cut a long story short

To cut a long story short is a phrase used to summarize or give a brief version of a story or narrative that would otherwise be lengthy or time-consuming to explain in full detail.

  • For instance, when retelling a personal anecdote, someone might say, “To cut a long story short, I ended up missing my flight.”
  • In a business meeting, a colleague might say, “To cut a long story short, we need to increase our marketing budget.”
  • A parent might use the phrase when explaining a series of events to their child, saying, “To cut a long story short, we got lost but eventually found our way back home.”

43. In brief

In brief means to provide a concise or condensed version of something, typically in a few sentences or a short paragraph. It is often used to give a quick overview or summary of a topic, argument, or situation.

  • For example, when introducing a new project, a team leader might say, “In brief, our goal is to increase sales by 20% within the next quarter.”
  • In a news headline, a journalist might write, “In brief, the stock market experienced a significant drop today.”
  • A teacher might use the phrase to summarize a complex concept, saying, “In brief, photosynthesis is the process by which plants convert sunlight into energy.”

44. To put it concisely

This phrase is used to quickly summarize or give a brief explanation of something without going into too much detail.

  • For example, “To put it concisely, the project was a success.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “To put it concisely, our sales have been steadily increasing.”
  • When discussing a complex topic, someone might say, “To put it concisely, the theory suggests that…”

45. To give you the lowdown

This phrase is used to give someone all the important details or information about a particular topic or situation.

  • For instance, “Let me give you the lowdown on what happened.”
  • In a conversation about a new restaurant, someone might say, “I’ll give you the lowdown on their menu.”
  • When discussing a recent news event, someone might say, “Here’s the lowdown on the situation…”

46. To give you the short version

This phrase is used to give someone a condensed or summarized version of something, typically to save time or provide a quick overview.

  • For example, “I’ll give you the short version of the story.”
  • In a meeting, someone might say, “Give me the short version of your report.”
  • When explaining a complex process, someone might say, “Here’s the short version of how it works…”

47. To give you the rundown

This phrase is used to give someone a thorough or detailed explanation of something, often including all the important or relevant information.

  • For instance, “Let me give you the rundown on the new project.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “I’ll give you the rundown of the plot.”
  • When discussing a new product, someone might say, “Here’s the rundown of its features and benefits…”

48. To give you the abridged version

This phrase is used to give someone a summarized or condensed version of something, typically to save time or provide a quick overview.

  • For example, “I’ll give you the abridged version of the novel.”
  • In a discussion about a historical event, someone might say, “Here’s the abridged version of what happened.”
  • When summarizing a long article, someone might say, “Here’s the abridged version of the main points…”

49. To give you the short and sweet version

This phrase is used when someone wants to provide a brief and simplified explanation or summary of a topic or situation.

  • For example, “To give you the short and sweet version, we lost the game because of a missed penalty.”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me give you the short and sweet version of our project.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you give me the short and sweet version of what happened at the party last night?”

50. To give you the quick and dirty version

This phrase is used when someone wants to provide a concise and straightforward explanation or summary of a topic or situation, without going into too much detail.

  • For instance, “To give you the quick and dirty version, we need to cut costs in order to stay in business.”
  • In a meeting, a colleague might say, “Let me give you the quick and dirty version of our marketing strategy.”
  • A teacher might explain, “Here’s the quick and dirty version of the lesson, but make sure to read the textbook for all the details.”