Top 27 Slang For Takeaway – Meaning & Usage

Takeaway food has become a staple in many households, especially during busy days or lazy nights. But, have you ever stopped to think about the various ways people refer to this convenient meal option? Well, wonder no more! We’ve put together a list of the trendiest and most common slang terms for takeaway that will have you ordering with a whole new level of coolness. Get ready to up your takeout game with our comprehensive guide!

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1. Takeout

Takeout refers to food that is prepared by a restaurant or eatery to be consumed off the premises. It is often packaged in containers or bags for convenient transportation.

  • For example, “Let’s order some takeout for dinner tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t feel like cooking, let’s get some takeout.”
  • In a conversation about food options, one might suggest, “We can always get some takeout if we don’t feel like dining in.”

2. To-go

To-go refers to food or drink that is packaged in a way that allows it to be taken away and consumed elsewhere. It is commonly used when ordering food or drinks for takeaway.

  • For instance, a person might ask, “Do you have any coffee to-go?”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “All our sandwiches are available to-go.”
  • In a conversation about lunch options, someone might suggest, “Let’s get something to-go and have a picnic in the park.”

3. Carryout

Carryout refers to food that is prepared by a restaurant or eatery specifically for takeaway. It is often used interchangeably with takeout and usually involves the customer physically carrying the food out of the establishment.

  • For example, “I’ll call and place a carryout order for dinner.”
  • A person might say, “I’m running late, can you pick up a carryout for me?”
  • In a discussion about dining options, someone might mention, “They have a great carryout menu if you don’t feel like dining in.”

4. Pickup

Pickup refers to the act of collecting food or drinks from a restaurant or eatery after placing an order, usually for takeaway. It involves physically going to the establishment to retrieve the order.

  • For instance, “I’ll swing by and do a pickup on my way home.”
  • A person might say, “I ordered online, so it’s just a quick pickup.”
  • In a conversation about dinner plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s do a pickup from that new Thai place.”

5. Grab-and-go

Grab-and-go refers to food or drinks that are pre-packaged and designed for quick consumption. It is often used in situations where people need to eat on the go or don’t have time for a sit-down meal.

  • For example, “I’ll just grab a sandwich and go since I’m running late.”
  • A person might say, “They have a grab-and-go section with pre-made salads and sandwiches.”
  • In a discussion about breakfast options, someone might suggest, “Let’s stop by the coffee shop for some grab-and-go pastries.”

6. Off-premises dining

This term refers to the practice of ordering food from a restaurant or establishment and consuming it outside of the premises. It can include takeout, delivery, or drive-thru options.

  • For example, during the pandemic, many restaurants shifted to off-premises dining to continue serving customers.
  • A person might say, “Let’s do off-premises dining tonight and order some pizza.”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “Enjoy our delicious dishes with off-premises dining options.”

7. Food on the fly

This phrase refers to getting food quickly and easily, often for immediate consumption. It implies a sense of convenience and efficiency.

  • For instance, a busy professional might say, “I usually grab some food on the fly during my lunch break.”
  • A person might recommend, “If you’re in a rush, try the food on the fly from that food truck.”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “Get your food on the fly and enjoy a tasty meal within minutes.”

8. Food to fly

This phrase indicates food that is prepared and packaged for takeout or to be eaten elsewhere. It implies that the food is portable and can be easily carried or transported.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m going to pick up some food to fly and have a picnic in the park.”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “Our food to fly options are perfect for a quick and delicious meal on the go.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Is there any good food to fly near the airport?”

9. Food to take home

This phrase simply means food that is intended to be taken home for consumption. It emphasizes the act of bringing the food back to one’s residence or a preferred location.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I’m too tired to cook tonight, so I’ll get some food to take home.”
  • A restaurant might offer, “We have a variety of options for food to take home, from family-sized meals to individual portions.”
  • A customer might ask, “Do you have any recommendations for food to take home that reheats well?”

10. Food to take out

This phrase refers to food that is ordered and picked up from a restaurant or establishment to be consumed elsewhere. It emphasizes the action of taking the food out of the establishment.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s get some food to take out and have a picnic at the beach.”
  • A restaurant might advertise, “Our menu offers a wide range of options for food to take out, perfect for any occasion.”
  • A customer might ask, “Can I see your menu for food to take out?”

11. Food to take away

This refers to food that is prepared in a restaurant or food establishment but is intended to be eaten off the premises. It is often packaged in containers that are convenient for transport.

  • For example, “I don’t feel like cooking tonight, let’s get some food to take away.”
  • A person might say, “I’m craving Chinese food, I’ll order some takeout.”
  • In a conversation about dinner plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s just get some food to take away and eat at home.”

12. Food to go

Similar to “food to take away,” this term refers to food that is prepared in a restaurant but is meant to be eaten elsewhere. It emphasizes the idea of quickly grabbing food and taking it with you.

  • For instance, “I’m in a hurry, I’ll get some food to go.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll swing by the deli and pick up some food to go for lunch.”
  • In a discussion about convenient dining options, someone might mention, “I love the convenience of grabbing food to go on busy days.”

13. Drive-thru

This term refers to a service offered by restaurants and fast food establishments where customers can place their orders and receive their food without leaving their vehicles. It often involves a window or intercom system for communication.

  • For example, “I’m in a rush, let’s just use the drive-thru.”
  • A person might say, “I love the convenience of getting my morning coffee through the drive-thru.”
  • In a conversation about fast food, someone might mention, “The drive-thru is always busy during lunchtime.”

14. Delivery

This refers to the service of transporting food from a restaurant or food establishment to a customer’s location. It is often done by a designated delivery person or through third-party delivery services.

  • For instance, “I don’t feel like cooking, let’s order some delivery.”
  • A person might say, “I’m too tired to go out, I’ll just get some delivery for dinner.”
  • In a discussion about different dining options, someone might mention, “Delivery is a convenient way to enjoy restaurant-quality food at home.”

15. Fast food

This term refers to food that is prepared and served quickly, often in a fast-food restaurant. It emphasizes the speed and convenience of the dining experience.

  • For example, “I’m in a hurry, let’s just grab some fast food.”
  • A person might say, “I’m craving a burger, let’s go to a fast-food joint.”
  • In a conversation about different types of restaurants, someone might mention, “Fast food is a popular choice for a quick and easy meal.”

16. Takeaway

This term refers to food that is prepared and packaged for consumption outside of the restaurant or establishment where it is purchased. It is commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “Let’s order some takeaway for dinner tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’m too tired to cook, let’s get some takeaway.”
  • In a conversation about food options, someone might ask, “Do you prefer takeaway or dining in?”

17. Food to-go

This phrase is used to describe food that is intended to be taken away and consumed elsewhere, rather than being eaten in a restaurant or at the place of purchase.

  • For instance, “I’ll have a burger and fries to-go.”
  • A person might say, “I’m in a rush, can I get this food to-go?”
  • In a discussion about lunch options, someone might suggest, “Let’s get some food to-go and have a picnic.”

18. To-carry

This term is used to indicate that the food is meant to be taken away and consumed elsewhere. It implies that the customer will carry the food with them.

  • For example, “I’ll have a sandwich to-carry.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t have time to eat here, can I get this to-carry?”
  • In a conversation about lunch plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s grab something to-carry and eat in the park.”

19. Grab-n-go

This phrase describes food that is designed to be quickly and conveniently grabbed and taken away for consumption on the go.

  • For instance, “I’ll just grab-n-go a coffee on my way to work.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t have time to sit down, I’ll just grab-n-go some food.”
  • In a discussion about breakfast options, someone might suggest, “Let’s get some grab-n-go pastries.”

20. Take-home

This term is used to indicate that the food is intended to be taken home and consumed there, rather than being eaten at the place of purchase.

  • For example, “I’ll have a pizza to take-home.”
  • A person might say, “I don’t feel like eating out, let’s get something take-home.”
  • In a conversation about dinner plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s pick up some take-home food and have a movie night.”

21. Takeaway meal

A takeaway meal refers to food that is prepared and packaged for consumption outside of the restaurant or food establishment. It is often associated with fast food or casual dining.

  • For example, “Let’s get a takeaway meal for dinner tonight.”
  • A person might say, “I’m craving a takeaway meal from that new burger joint.”
  • When discussing lunch options, someone might suggest, “We can grab a takeaway meal and eat it in the park.”

22. Takeout order

A takeout order refers to food that is ordered from a restaurant or food establishment for delivery or pickup. It allows customers to enjoy their favorite meals without dining in.

  • For instance, “I’ll place a takeout order for pizza.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s have a movie night and get a takeout order of Chinese food.”
  • When discussing dinner plans, someone might suggest, “We can each choose a different cuisine and place a takeout order.”

23. Grab-to-go

Grab-to-go is a term used to describe a meal or food item that is quickly picked up and taken away for immediate consumption. It emphasizes the convenience and speed of getting food on the go.

  • For example, “I’m in a rush, so I’ll just grab-to-go a sandwich.”
  • A person might say, “I always have some grab-to-go snacks in my bag for emergencies.”
  • When discussing breakfast options, someone might suggest, “Let’s grab-to-go some pastries and coffee.”

24. Pickup order

A pickup order refers to food that is ordered in advance and collected by the customer from the restaurant or food establishment. It eliminates the need to wait for the food to be delivered.

  • For instance, “I’ll place a pickup order for sushi.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer pickup orders because I can control the timing.”
  • When discussing lunch plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s each place a pickup order and meet at the park to eat together.”

25. Drive-thru order

A drive-thru order refers to food that is ordered and collected without leaving the car. It allows customers to conveniently get their food without the need to park and enter the restaurant.

  • For example, “I’ll just make a quick drive-thru order for coffee.”
  • A person might say, “Drive-thru orders are great when you’re in a hurry.”
  • When discussing dinner options, someone might suggest, “Let’s get some drive-thru orders and have a picnic in the car.”

26. Delivery order

This term refers to placing an order for food that will be delivered to your location. It is commonly used when ordering takeout from a restaurant and having it delivered to your home or office.

  • For example, “I don’t feel like cooking tonight, let’s just get a delivery order.”
  • A person might say, “I always make a delivery order when I’m too busy to cook.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your go-to restaurant for delivery orders?”

27. Fast food order

This term specifically refers to placing an order for food at a fast food restaurant. Fast food orders are typically made at the counter or through a drive-thru window for immediate consumption or takeout.

  • For instance, “I’ll have a fast food order of a cheeseburger and fries.”
  • A person might say, “I usually grab a fast food order when I’m in a hurry.”
  • Another might ask, “What’s your favorite fast food order?”
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