Top 37 Slang For Indoctrination – Meaning & Usage

Indoctrination, a term that often sparks controversy and debate, has its own set of slang and terminology within certain circles. For those looking to understand this complex concept better or simply stay informed, we’ve got you covered. Our team has delved into the depths of this topic to bring you a curated list of the most intriguing slang for indoctrination that you won’t want to miss. Stay ahead of the curve and dive into this insightful article now!

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1. Brainwashing

Brainwashing refers to the process of manipulating someone’s thoughts and beliefs to conform to a certain ideology or belief system. It often involves using psychological tactics to control and influence a person’s thinking.

  • For example, a cult might use brainwashing techniques to indoctrinate new members into their belief system.
  • In a discussion about propaganda, someone might say, “The government is trying to brainwash us with their biased news.”
  • A person might describe a manipulative relationship as, “He tried to brainwash me into thinking I couldn’t survive without him.”

2. Programming

Programming refers to the conditioning of someone’s behavior and beliefs to align with a particular ideology or agenda. It involves systematically influencing a person’s thoughts, actions, and values through repetitive messaging and reinforcement.

  • For instance, a political party might use programming techniques to shape public opinion and gain support for their policies.
  • In a discussion about advertising, someone might say, “Companies spend billions on programming us to buy their products.”
  • A person might describe a strict upbringing as, “My parents programmed me to always follow the rules.”

3. Cultivating

Cultivating refers to the process of nurturing and fostering specific beliefs or ideologies in individuals or groups. It involves creating an environment that encourages the adoption and reinforcement of certain ideas.

  • For example, a religious organization might focus on cultivating faith and devotion among its followers.
  • In a discussion about education, someone might say, “Teachers play a crucial role in cultivating critical thinking skills.”
  • A person might describe a mentor as, “She was instrumental in cultivating my passion for art.”

4. Inculcation

Inculcation refers to the process of imparting beliefs or values through repetitive instruction or indoctrination. It involves instilling certain ideas or principles in a person’s mind through persistent repetition.

  • For instance, a totalitarian regime might use inculcation to control the thoughts and actions of its citizens.
  • In a discussion about religious upbringing, someone might say, “My parents focused on inculcating moral values in me.”
  • A person might describe a propaganda campaign as, “The government is using inculcation to manipulate public opinion.”

5. Grooming

Grooming refers to the process of preparing someone for indoctrination or manipulation. It involves building a relationship of trust and influence with the intention of controlling and manipulating the person’s thoughts and actions.

  • For example, a cult leader might groom potential recruits by showering them with attention and praise.
  • In a discussion about online predators, someone might say, “They use grooming techniques to gain the trust of their victims.”
  • A person might describe a manipulative relationship as, “He slowly started grooming me by isolating me from my friends and family.”

6. Implanting

This term refers to the act of embedding or planting ideas or beliefs in someone’s mind, often through repetitive messaging or manipulation. It is often used to describe the process of indoctrination or brainwashing.

  • For example, a cult might be accused of implanting false beliefs in its members.
  • In a political context, one might say, “The government is implanting propaganda in the minds of the citizens.”
  • A person discussing advertising might mention, “Companies use clever marketing techniques to implant the idea that their product is essential.”

7. Propagandizing

This term describes the act of spreading propaganda, which is information, ideas, or rumors deliberately spread to influence or manipulate public opinion. It often involves presenting biased or misleading information to further a particular agenda.

  • For instance, during wartime, governments often engage in propagandizing to rally support for the war effort.
  • In a discussion about media manipulation, one might say, “The media outlet is propagandizing its viewers with biased reporting.”
  • A person might accuse a political party of propagandizing to gain power.

8. Converting

This term refers to the act of persuading someone to change their beliefs, often to adopt a different religion, ideology, or way of thinking. It involves convincing someone to abandon their previous beliefs and adopt new ones.

  • For example, missionaries often focus on converting individuals to their religious beliefs.
  • In a discussion about political ideologies, one might say, “He was successful in converting many people to his socialist ideas.”
  • A person might mention, “The cult leader was skilled at converting vulnerable individuals to his extremist beliefs.”

9. Indoctrinating

This term describes the process of teaching someone a set of beliefs, ideas, or values without encouraging critical thinking or questioning. It often involves instilling beliefs from a young age and discouraging alternative perspectives.

  • For instance, a totalitarian regime might indoctrinate its citizens with propaganda and suppress dissenting views.
  • In a discussion about education, one might say, “The school is accused of indoctrinating students with biased historical narratives.”
  • A person might express concern about religious institutions indoctrinating young children.
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10. Socializing

In the context of indoctrination, this term refers to the act of influencing someone’s beliefs or behaviors through social interaction or group dynamics. It involves using social pressure, conformity, and peer influence to shape an individual’s thoughts and actions.

  • For example, a cult might use socializing techniques to control its members and reinforce its belief system.
  • In a discussion about political ideologies, one might say, “The party is skilled at socializing its members to conform to its agenda.”
  • A person might mention, “Socializing can be a powerful tool for indoctrination, as it creates a sense of belonging and conformity.”

11. Instructing

This refers to the act of providing knowledge or information to someone in a structured and systematic manner, often with the intention of influencing their beliefs or behaviors.

  • For example, a cult leader might be instructing their followers on the group’s ideology and practices.
  • In a military setting, a drill sergeant might be instructing new recruits on proper marching techniques.
  • A teacher might be instructing their students on a particular subject or topic.

12. Training

This refers to the process of teaching and preparing someone, often through repetition and practice, to acquire specific skills or behaviors. Training can be used as a form of indoctrination when it aims to shape and control an individual’s thoughts and actions.

  • For instance, a political organization might be training their members to adhere to a specific ideology and follow certain protocols.
  • In a religious context, a religious leader might be training their followers to adopt certain beliefs and practices.
  • In a corporate setting, employees might undergo training to align their behaviors with the company’s values and objectives.

13. Molding

This refers to the process of influencing and shaping someone’s thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors to conform to a particular ideology or system of thinking. Molding can involve both direct and indirect methods of indoctrination.

  • For example, a totalitarian regime might be molding its citizens’ opinions through propaganda and censorship.
  • In a cult, the leader might be molding the beliefs and behaviors of their followers through manipulation and control.
  • Parents and guardians also play a role in molding the beliefs and values of their children through upbringing and socialization.

14. Instilling

This refers to the act of gradually and persistently implanting certain ideas, values, or beliefs into someone’s mind. It involves repetition and reinforcement to ensure the desired beliefs or behaviors become deeply ingrained.

  • For instance, a religious leader might be instilling faith and devotion in their followers through regular sermons and rituals.
  • In a political context, a leader might be instilling patriotism and loyalty in their supporters through speeches and public events.
  • In an educational setting, teachers might be instilling knowledge and critical thinking skills in their students through lessons and assignments.

15. Enforcing

This refers to the act of ensuring compliance and obedience to a particular set of beliefs or rules. Enforcing can involve both rewards and punishments to reinforce the desired behaviors and suppress dissent or deviation.

  • For example, a totalitarian regime might be enforcing its ideology through surveillance, censorship, and punishment for dissent.
  • In a cult, leaders might be enforcing strict rules and regulations to maintain control over their followers.
  • In an organizational setting, managers might be enforcing company policies and procedures to ensure conformity among employees.

16. Embedding

This term refers to the process of infiltrating and influencing someone’s beliefs or ideas, often through subtle or hidden means. It involves implanting certain ideologies or values into a person’s mindset.

  • For example, a cult leader might use embedding techniques to indoctrinate new members into their belief system.
  • In a discussion about propaganda, someone might say, “The government uses embedding techniques to control public opinion.”
  • A person studying brainwashing might explain, “Embedding is a key component of the indoctrination process, as it allows for long-term manipulation of an individual’s thoughts and behaviors.”

17. Infiltrating

This term refers to the act of gaining entry into a group or organization with the intention of influencing its members or spreading a particular ideology. It involves becoming a part of the group and gradually introducing new ideas or beliefs.

  • For instance, a spy might infiltrate an extremist organization to gather information and disrupt their activities.
  • In a conversation about cults, someone might say, “The leader sends members to infiltrate other groups and recruit new followers.”
  • A person discussing the dangers of indoctrination might warn, “Beware of individuals who use infiltration tactics to manipulate and control others.”

18. Assimilating

This term refers to the process of absorbing and conforming to a particular set of beliefs or values. It involves adopting the ideologies of a group or organization and aligning oneself with their principles.

  • For example, a person who joins a religious cult may undergo a process of assimilation, gradually adopting the group’s beliefs and practices.
  • In a discussion about political ideologies, someone might say, “The party expects its members to assimilate to its core principles.”
  • A person studying social conformity might explain, “Assimilation is often a result of social pressure and the desire to fit in with a particular group.”

19. Hypnotizing

This term refers to the act of mesmerizing and controlling someone’s thoughts or actions through hypnotic techniques. It involves inducing a trance-like state in a person, making them highly susceptible to suggestions.

  • For instance, a manipulative leader might use hypnotizing techniques to gain control over their followers.
  • In a conversation about mind control, someone might say, “The cult leader used hypnotizing techniques to manipulate his followers.”
  • A person discussing the power of persuasion might warn, “Beware of individuals who try to hypnotize you into adopting their beliefs or ideologies.”

20. Coercing

This term refers to the act of forcing or pressuring someone to adopt a particular belief or ideology. It involves using threats, manipulation, or other forms of coercion to make an individual comply.

  • For example, a cult may use coercive tactics to make their members conform to their beliefs.
  • In a discussion about indoctrination, someone might say, “The government uses coercive methods to control the population.”
  • A person studying psychological manipulation might explain, “Coercion is a common technique used by cults and extremist groups to indoctrinate individuals.”

21. Radicalizing

The act of influencing and indoctrinating individuals with extreme beliefs or ideologies, often by manipulating their emotions and thoughts.

  • For example, “The terrorist group has been radicalizing vulnerable individuals through online propaganda.”
  • A discussion about online radicalization might involve someone saying, “We need to find ways to prevent the radicalizing of young people.”
  • A news article might report, “The cult was known for radicalizing its members through isolation and manipulation.”

22. Conditioning

The process of training and shaping someone’s behavior or beliefs through repeated stimuli and reinforcement.

  • For instance, in a discussion about cults, someone might mention, “They use conditioning techniques to control their members.”
  • A psychology expert might explain, “Conditioning can be both positive, like rewarding desired behaviors, and negative, like punishing unwanted behaviors.”
  • A person reflecting on their past might say, “I realized I had been conditioned to think a certain way and had to break free from that mindset.”

23. Propaganda

Information or ideas that are spread to influence public opinion and promote a particular agenda or belief. Propaganda often uses biased or misleading tactics to shape people’s views.

  • For example, “The government used propaganda to rally support for the war.”
  • A discussion about advertising might involve someone saying, “Advertisements often employ propaganda techniques to persuade consumers.”
  • A news article might criticize a politician for spreading propaganda, stating, “The candidate’s campaign is filled with misleading propaganda.”

24. Mind control

The act of exerting control over someone’s thoughts, beliefs, and behaviors, often through psychological manipulation and coercion.

  • For instance, in a conversation about cults, someone might mention, “They use mind control techniques to keep their members obedient.”
  • A survivor of a manipulative relationship might share their experience, saying, “I felt trapped and under constant mind control.”
  • A documentary about psychological experiments might explore the concept of mind control and its ethical implications.
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25. Thought reform

The process of changing someone’s thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes to align with a particular ideology or doctrine, often through systematic and coercive methods.

  • For example, “The cult employed thought reform techniques to manipulate its members.”
  • A discussion about political indoctrination might involve someone saying, “Thought reform is used to suppress dissenting opinions.”
  • A survivor of a cult might reflect on their experience, stating, “Thought reform stripped me of my individuality and critical thinking skills.”

26. Persuasion

The act of convincing someone to believe or do something through reasoning or argumentation.

  • For example, a salesperson might use persuasion techniques to convince a customer to buy a product.
  • In a political campaign, candidates often use persuasion to sway voters to support them.
  • A teacher might use persuasion to motivate students to study and do their homework.

27. Socialization

The process of learning and internalizing societal norms, values, and behaviors through interactions with others in a social group.

  • For instance, children are socialized by their parents and peers to learn appropriate behavior.
  • In a workplace, new employees go through socialization to understand the company’s culture and expectations.
  • A cult may use socialization techniques to indoctrinate members into its belief system.

28. Indoctrination

The process of forcibly instilling a set of beliefs or ideologies in someone’s mind, often without their critical thinking or consent.

  • For example, a totalitarian regime may use indoctrination to control the thoughts and actions of its citizens.
  • Cults are known for their use of indoctrination techniques to manipulate and control their members.
  • A parent might accuse a school of indoctrination if they believe their child is being taught biased or one-sided information.
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29. Influence

The power to affect or change someone’s thoughts, beliefs, or actions.

  • For instance, celebrities often have a significant influence on their fans’ purchasing decisions.
  • A charismatic leader can have a strong influence on their followers’ behavior and beliefs.
  • Advertisements are designed to influence consumers to buy a particular product.

30. Imprinting

The process of forming strong and lasting beliefs or behaviors based on early experiences or exposure to certain ideas or stimuli.

  • For example, a child may imprint on their parents’ political beliefs and carry them into adulthood.
  • In psychology, imprinting refers to the process by which certain animals form attachments to their caregivers shortly after birth.
  • A person who grew up in a religious household may have an imprinting of religious beliefs that shape their worldview.

31. Brainwash

The act of brainwashing involves manipulating someone’s thoughts and beliefs to conform to a certain ideology or belief system. It often involves intense and repetitive conditioning techniques.

  • For example, a cult leader might brainwash their followers into believing they are the only true path to salvation.
  • In a discussion about political propaganda, someone might say, “The government is trying to brainwash us with their biased media.”
  • A person might warn others, “Be careful of falling victim to brainwashing tactics used by manipulative individuals or organizations.”

32. Coercion

Coercion refers to the act of using force or threats to compel someone to adopt certain beliefs or behaviors, often against their will. It can be done through physical, psychological, or emotional means.

  • For instance, a person might be coerced into joining a gang through threats of violence.
  • In a discussion about religious indoctrination, someone might say, “Children should not be subjected to coercion when it comes to their religious beliefs.”
  • A person might argue, “Coercion is a violation of personal autonomy and freedom of thought.”

33. Assimilation

Assimilation refers to the process of forcing someone to adopt the beliefs, values, and behaviors of a dominant culture, often at the expense of their own cultural identity. It is a form of indoctrination that aims to homogenize a society.

  • For example, indigenous peoples have historically been subjected to assimilation policies by colonial powers.
  • In a discussion about cultural diversity, someone might say, “Assimilation erases the rich tapestry of different cultures.”
  • A person might argue, “True integration should celebrate and respect cultural differences, rather than promoting assimilation.”

34. Social engineering

Social engineering involves manipulating social structures and norms to shape people’s beliefs and behaviors. It often occurs on a societal level and can be used to exert control or influence over a population.

  • For instance, a government might engage in social engineering to promote certain political ideologies.
  • In a discussion about advertising, someone might say, “Marketers often use social engineering techniques to manipulate consumer behavior.”
  • A person might caution, “We should be aware of the potential dangers of social engineering and guard against manipulation.”

35. Persuading

Persuading refers to the act of convincing someone to adopt certain beliefs or behaviors through logical reasoning, emotional appeal, or other persuasive techniques. While it can be a legitimate form of communication, it can also be used as a tool for indoctrination.

  • For example, a political campaign might aim to persuade voters to support a particular candidate.
  • In a discussion about marketing tactics, someone might say, “Advertisers are experts at persuading consumers to buy their products.”
  • A person might argue, “Persuasion should be based on informed consent and respect for individual autonomy.”

36. Faith indoctrination

Faith indoctrination refers to the process of converting someone to a particular religious belief or ideology. It involves teaching and persuading individuals to adopt a specific set of beliefs and values.

  • For example, a person might say, “The church has a strong focus on faith indoctrination, ensuring that all members adhere to their religious teachings.”
  • In a discussion about religious practices, someone might argue, “Faith indoctrination can be harmful as it limits critical thinking and promotes blind obedience.”
  • A former member of a religious group might share their experience, “I was subjected to intense faith indoctrination during my time in the cult.”

37. Ideological persuasion

Ideological persuasion refers to the manipulation and influencing of individuals’ beliefs and values to align with a specific ideology or political agenda. It often involves using persuasive tactics to change someone’s opinions or convince them to support a particular cause.

  • For instance, a person might say, “The political party uses ideological persuasion to gain support for their policies.”
  • In a discussion about propaganda, someone might argue, “Ideological persuasion is a form of brainwashing that manipulates people’s thoughts and emotions.”
  • A person who has been influenced by ideological persuasion might share their story, “I used to have different political views, but after being exposed to constant ideological persuasion, I started to believe in their cause.”