Top 20 Slang For Intrigue – Meaning & Usage

In a world full of mystery and excitement, keeping up with the latest slang for intrigue is essential for those looking to add a touch of enigma to their conversations. From covert code words to subtle hints, our team has scoured the depths of modern language to bring you a curated list of the most intriguing slang terms that will leave you wanting more. Dive into this listicle and unlock a whole new world of linguistic excitement!

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1. Tea

In slang, “tea” refers to gossip or information about someone or something. It can also be used to describe a scandalous or juicy story.

  • For example, “I heard some tea about our boss getting fired.”
  • A person might say, “Spill the tea! What’s the latest drama?”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have any tea on that new celebrity couple?”

2. Juice

In slang, “juice” refers to the juicy details or information about a situation or person. It can also be used to describe something exciting or interesting.

  • For instance, “I need to know all the juice about that new reality TV show.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the juice on what really happened at the party.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the juice on that new restaurant in town?”

3. Scoop

In slang, “scoop” refers to insider information or news that is not widely known. It can also be used to describe getting exclusive access to a story or event.

  • For example, “I got the scoop on the upcoming product launch.”
  • A person might say, “Give me the scoop on that secret project you’re working on.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have the scoop on who’s dating who in Hollywood?”

4. Dirt

In slang, “dirt” refers to secret or scandalous information about someone or something. It can also be used to describe embarrassing or compromising details.

  • For instance, “I heard some dirt about that politician’s past.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the dirt on why they broke up.”
  • Someone might ask, “What’s the dirt on that new celebrity scandal?”

5. Lowdown

In slang, “lowdown” refers to inside information or the true details about a situation or person. It can also be used to describe getting the full story or the real facts.

  • For example, “Give me the lowdown on what really happened at the party.”
  • A person might say, “I’ve got the lowdown on why they’re leaving the company.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you have the lowdown on the latest fashion trends?”

6. Skinny

This term refers to confidential or privileged information that is not widely known. It can also refer to the truth or real story behind a situation.

  • For example, “I’ve got the skinny on what really happened at the party last night.”
  • In a gossip-filled conversation, someone might say, “Give me the skinny on the latest celebrity scandal.”
  • A detective might say, “I need to gather some skinny on the suspect before making an arrest.”

7. Buzz

This slang term can refer to a rumor or gossip that is circulating among a group of people. It can also describe the feeling of excitement or anticipation surrounding a particular event or topic.

  • For instance, “There’s a buzz going around that the company is going to announce layoffs.”
  • In a discussion about upcoming movies, someone might say, “There’s a lot of buzz surrounding the new superhero film.”
  • A sports fan might say, “The buzz in the stadium was electric as the home team made a comeback.”

8. 411

This term is derived from the telephone number used to access directory assistance in the United States. It is used to refer to general information or details about a particular topic.

  • For example, “Can you give me the 411 on the new restaurant in town?”
  • In a conversation about a celebrity scandal, someone might ask, “What’s the 411 on their breakup?”
  • A person seeking advice might say, “I need the 411 on how to start a successful business.”

9. Intel

Short for “intelligence,” this term is often used to refer to secret or classified information about a particular subject. It can also be used to describe knowledge or insight gained from personal experience or observation.

  • For instance, “I’ve got some intel on the competitor’s new product launch.”
  • In a spy novel, a character might say, “I need to gather intel on the enemy’s plans.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’ve been working my sources to get some intel on the corruption scandal.”

10. Goss

This slang term is short for “gossip” and refers to informal or casual conversation about other people’s private lives or personal matters. It can also be used to describe rumors or speculation about a particular event or situation.

  • For example, “Have you heard the latest goss about our coworkers?”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity’s love life, someone might say, “I’ve got some juicy goss on who they’re dating.”
  • A group of friends might say, “Let’s meet up for coffee and catch up on all the goss.”

11. Tidbit

This refers to a small or interesting piece of information or gossip. It is often used to describe something that is not widely known.

  • For instance, “I heard a tidbit about the CEO’s upcoming resignation.”
  • In a conversation about a new movie, someone might say, “I have a tidbit of information about the plot twist.”
  • A friend might share, “Here’s a tidbit for you: the restaurant we’re going to has a secret menu.”

12. Word on the street

This refers to the information or gossip that is circulating among people in a particular community or neighborhood. It implies that the information might not be entirely reliable or confirmed.

  • For example, “The word on the street is that there’s going to be a surprise party for Jane.”
  • In a discussion about a local event, someone might say, “I heard the word on the street is that there will be live music.”
  • A neighbor might ask, “What’s the word on the street about the new neighbors?”

13. Inside track

This term refers to having special or exclusive access to information or knowledge that is not available to everyone. It implies being well-informed and having an advantage.

  • For instance, “He has the inside track on the company’s future plans.”
  • In a conversation about a sports team, someone might say, “I have the inside track on the coach’s strategy for the next game.”
  • A colleague might ask, “Do you have the inside track on the upcoming project?”

14. Scuttlebutt

This term refers to rumors or gossip that is circulating among a group of people. It is often used in informal settings or in reference to office gossip.

  • For example, “I heard some scuttlebutt about layoffs happening next month.”
  • In a discussion about a celebrity scandal, someone might say, “The scuttlebutt is that they’re getting a divorce.”
  • A coworker might ask, “What’s the scuttlebutt on the new boss?”

15. Jive

This term refers to talk or language that is meant to deceive or mislead. It can also mean insincere or exaggerated talk.

  • For instance, “Don’t believe his jive, he’s just trying to get out of trouble.”
  • In a conversation about a sales pitch, someone might say, “The salesman’s jive was too good to be true.”
  • A friend might comment, “I can see through her jive, she’s not being honest.”

16. Hush-hush

This term refers to something that is kept quiet or not widely known. It implies that the information is confidential or meant to be kept hidden.

  • For example, “The project is top-secret, so it’s all hush-hush.”
  • A gossip might say, “I heard some hush-hush about the new celebrity couple.”
  • In a suspenseful movie, a character might whisper, “There’s something hush-hush going on behind the scenes.”

17. Hot tip

A “hot tip” is a piece of information that is considered valuable or useful, especially in a specific context or situation.

  • For instance, in the stock market, someone might say, “I got a hot tip on a promising tech company.”
  • A sports fan might share, “I have a hot tip on the upcoming game. The underdog might surprise everyone.”
  • A detective might receive a hot tip about a potential suspect in a case.
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18. The scoop

This term refers to the inside information or details about a particular situation or event. It can also refer to the latest news or updates.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I got the scoop on the celebrity scandal.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s the scoop on the new restaurant in town?”
  • In a conversation about a recent political development, someone might say, “Give me the scoop on the latest policy change.”

19. The lowdown

The “lowdown” refers to the detailed information or facts about a particular subject or situation. It can also imply having a thorough understanding or knowledge.

  • For instance, a coworker might say, “Give me the lowdown on the new project.”
  • A friend might ask, “What’s the lowdown on the party this weekend?”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let me give you the lowdown on the issue.”

20. The dirt

The term “the dirt” refers to scandalous or controversial information about someone or something. It often implies negative or damaging details that may be considered gossip.

  • For example, a tabloid headline might read, “Get the dirt on the celebrity’s secret affair.”
  • A friend might say, “I heard some juicy dirt about that new employee.”
  • In a conversation about a political figure, someone might ask, “What’s the dirt on their questionable financial dealings?”