Top 36 Slang For Exaggerate – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to storytelling, sometimes a little embellishment can make a tale more entertaining. But what do we call it when someone takes it a step too far? Join us as we uncover the colorful and creative ways people use slang to describe those who tend to stretch the truth. Get ready to add some new expressions to your vocabulary and have a good laugh along the way!

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1. Amp up

To “amp up” means to make something more intense or exaggerated. It is often used to describe the act of exaggerating a story or situation.

  • For example, “He really amped up his performance during the concert.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “Let’s amp up the music and make it a night to remember!”
  • A friend might exaggerate their weekend plans by saying, “I’m going to amp up the fun and have the best time ever!”

2. Blow out of proportion

To “blow something out of proportion” means to exaggerate or make something seem more important or significant than it actually is.

  • For instance, “She blew the situation out of proportion by accusing him of something he didn’t do.”
  • In a discussion about a minor disagreement, someone might say, “Let’s not blow this out of proportion. It’s just a difference of opinion.”
  • A person might exaggerate a small mistake by saying, “I can’t believe I messed up! This is the end of the world!”

3. Embellish

To “embellish” means to add extra details or exaggerate certain aspects of a story or situation for dramatic effect.

  • For example, “He embellished his fishing story by claiming the fish was twice as big as it actually was.”
  • In a conversation about a party, someone might say, “Let’s embellish the decorations and create a magical atmosphere!”
  • A friend might exaggerate their cooking skills by saying, “I can embellish any dish and make it taste gourmet!”

4. Stretch the truth

To “stretch the truth” means to exaggerate or distort the facts in order to make something seem more impressive or dramatic.

  • For instance, “He stretched the truth about his qualifications in order to get the job.”
  • In a discussion about a vacation, someone might say, “I’ll stretch the truth a little and tell everyone it was the best trip of my life.”
  • A person might exaggerate their athletic abilities by saying, “I can stretch the truth and make it sound like I’m a professional athlete!”

5. Hyperbolize

To “hyperbolize” means to exaggerate or amplify something for rhetorical effect. It involves using extravagant language or over-the-top statements to make a point or create emphasis.

  • For example, “He hyperbolized the impact of the new technology by claiming it would change the world.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “The special effects were so amazing, they hyperbolized the action scenes!”
  • A friend might exaggerate their excitement by saying, “I’m so hyperbolized about the upcoming concert, I can’t contain myself!”

6. Magnify

To exaggerate or make something seem larger, more important, or more significant than it actually is.

  • For example, “She magnified her accomplishments on her resume to impress potential employers.”
  • In a conversation about a minor issue, someone might say, “Let’s not magnify this into a major problem.”
  • A news article might criticize a politician for magnifying the impact of a policy change.

7. Overstate

To make something seem more important, impressive, or extreme than it actually is.

  • For instance, “He tends to overstate his abilities when applying for jobs.”
  • In a discussion about a sports event, someone might say, “The announcer tends to overstate the significance of every play.”
  • A friend might joke, “You always overstate your case when arguing with me.”

8. Fabricate

To invent or create something, especially a story or an excuse, that is not true.

  • For example, “He fabricated an elaborate alibi to avoid getting in trouble.”
  • In a court case, a lawyer might accuse a witness of fabricating evidence.
  • A friend might say, “Don’t believe him, he tends to fabricate stories to make himself look better.”

9. Pad

To add extra details or exaggerate certain aspects of a story or statement.

  • For instance, “He padded his resume with additional skills he didn’t actually possess.”
  • In a conversation about a fishing trip, someone might say, “He always pads his fish stories with exaggerated sizes.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Don’t pad your excuses for not finishing your homework.”

10. Amplify

To exaggerate or make something seem much more significant or serious than it actually is.

  • For example, “She amplified a minor disagreement into a full-blown argument.”
  • In a discussion about a small mistake, someone might say, “Let’s not amplify this into a major issue.”
  • A news headline might read, “Politician amplifies concerns over proposed legislation.”

11. Aggrandize

Aggrandize means to make something or someone appear greater or more important than they actually are. It can also refer to exaggerating the value or importance of something.

  • For example, a person might say, “He tends to aggrandize his accomplishments to impress others.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “The marketing team tends to aggrandize the benefits of our product in their advertisements.”
  • A critic might accuse a politician of aggrandizing their achievements to gain support.
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12. Color

To color a story means to add exaggerated or distorted details to make it more interesting or exciting. It can also refer to adding a biased perspective or interpretation to a story.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He tends to color his stories to make himself look better.”
  • In a conversation about a recent event, someone might say, “The media often colors their reporting to fit their own agenda.”
  • A writer might use colorful language to make their story more engaging.

13. Embiggen

Embiggen is a playful and humorous word that means to make something bigger or more significant, often in an exaggerated or exaggerated way. It is often used in a lighthearted or joking manner.

  • For example, a person might say, “Let’s embiggen this party by inviting more friends!”
  • In a discussion about a project, someone might suggest, “We should embiggen the font size to make it more readable.”
  • A comedian might use the word embiggen to describe their exaggerated gestures on stage.

14. Fudge

Fudge means to alter or manipulate information or data in order to make it more favorable or exaggerated. It can also refer to making a mistake or error in recording or reporting information.

  • For instance, a person might say, “He tends to fudge the numbers to make his results look better.”
  • In a conversation about a financial report, someone might say, “We need to make sure not to fudge any of the data.”
  • A journalist might accuse a politician of fudging the facts in their speech.

15. Heighten

Heighten means to increase the intensity or severity of something, often in an exaggerated or dramatic way. It can also refer to making something more intense or extreme than it actually is.

  • For example, a person might say, “She tends to heighten her emotions for attention.”
  • In a discussion about a movie, someone might say, “The director used lighting and music to heighten the suspense.”
  • A writer might use heightened language to create a more vivid description.

16. Inflate

To exaggerate or overstate something, making it seem more significant or important than it actually is.

  • For example, a person might say, “Don’t inflate your accomplishments just to impress others.”
  • In a discussion about a news story, someone might comment, “The media tends to inflate certain details to create sensational headlines.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “You always inflate the size of the fish you caught!”

17. Overdo

To do something to an excessive or exaggerated degree.

  • For instance, if someone is decorating their house for Halloween, they might be told, “Don’t overdo it with the spooky decorations.”
  • In a conversation about exercise, a person might say, “I need to be careful not to overdo it at the gym and risk injury.”
  • A friend might comment, “You really overdid it with the toppings on that pizza!”

18. Stretch

To exaggerate or embellish the facts or details of a story or statement.

  • For example, if someone is telling a story about a fishing trip, they might say, “I might be stretching the truth a bit, but that fish was at least 3 feet long!”
  • In a discussion about a work project, a person might admit, “I may have stretched the truth on my resume to get hired.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t stretch the truth, just tell me what really happened.”

19. Upplay

To exaggerate or overemphasize the positive aspects or importance of something.

  • For instance, if someone is promoting a new product, they might say, “We’re not trying to upplay it, but this is the best thing on the market.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, a person might say, “The critics are really upplaying how good this film is.”
  • A friend might comment, “You always upplay your cooking skills, but this dish is amazing!”

20. Aggravate

To exaggerate or make a situation seem much worse or more serious than it actually is.

  • For example, if someone is upset about a small mistake, they might be told, “Don’t aggravate the situation, it’s not a big deal.”
  • In a discussion about a minor inconvenience, a person might say, “Some people just love to aggravate every little thing.”
  • A friend might comment, “You always aggravate the smallest issues and blow them out of proportion.”

21. Bloat

To exaggerate or overstate something, often to make it seem more important or impressive than it actually is.

  • For example, “He tends to bloat his achievements when talking to others.”
  • In a discussion about a recent project, someone might say, “Let’s not bloat the numbers to make it seem better than it actually is.”
  • A friend might jokingly say, “Don’t bloat the story too much when you’re telling it.”

22. Embolden

To enhance or exaggerate the significance or impact of something, usually to inspire confidence or courage.

  • For instance, “The coach’s pep talk emboldened the team to give their best performance.”
  • In a political context, someone might say, “The controversial decision only emboldened the opposition.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage the audience by saying, “Let your failures embolden you to strive for success.”

23. Hyperinflate

To greatly exaggerate or overstate something, often beyond reasonable limits.

  • For example, “The politician’s campaign promises were hyperinflated and unrealistic.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s ego, one might say, “He tends to hyperinflate his own importance.”
  • A person might describe a friend’s storytelling as “hyperinflated with embellishments.”
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24. Amp it up

To intensify or exaggerate something, often to make it more exciting or impressive.

  • For instance, “The DJ amped up the crowd with a high-energy mix.”
  • In a conversation about a workout routine, someone might say, “I need to amp it up to see better results.”
  • A friend might encourage another by saying, “You need to amp up your confidence and go for it!”

25. Stretch the facts

To distort or exaggerate the details or truth of something, often to make it more interesting or dramatic.

  • For example, “He tends to stretch the facts when telling stories to make them more entertaining.”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might say, “The author seemed to stretch the facts to fit their narrative.”
  • A parent might warn their child, “Don’t stretch the facts when explaining what happened.”

26. Blow up

This term means to greatly exaggerate or overstate something.

  • For example, “He blew up the story, making it sound much more dramatic than it actually was.”
  • In a discussion about a sports event, someone might say, “Don’t blow up the importance of one bad play.”
  • A person might exaggerate their accomplishments by saying, “I blew up that project and made it a huge success.”

27. Overplay

To overplay means to exaggerate or overemphasize a role or situation, often for dramatic effect.

  • For instance, a theater critic might say, “The actor overplayed the role, resulting in an unrealistic performance.”
  • In a discussion about a sports match, someone might comment, “The player overplayed their injury to draw a penalty.”
  • A person might overplay their reaction to a joke by saying, “That’s the funniest thing I’ve ever heard! I’m dying of laughter!”

28. Overdo it

This phrase means to exaggerate or go beyond what is necessary or appropriate.

  • For example, “She always overdoes it with the decorations for parties.”
  • In a discussion about exercise, someone might say, “Be careful not to overdo it and risk injury.”
  • A person might overdo it with their compliments by saying, “You’re the most amazing person I’ve ever met! I can’t believe how incredible you are!”

29. Overblow

To overblow means to exaggerate or magnify something, often to make it seem more important or dramatic than it actually is.

  • For instance, “The media tends to overblow minor incidents into major scandals.”
  • In a discussion about a rumor, someone might say, “Let’s not overblow this gossip and jump to conclusions.”
  • A person might overblow their achievements by saying, “I single-handedly saved the company from bankruptcy!”

30. Overemphasize

To overemphasize means to place too much importance or significance on something, often exaggerating its impact or value.

  • For example, “He tends to overemphasize the role of luck in his success.”
  • In a discussion about a minor detail, someone might comment, “Let’s not overemphasize this small issue and lose sight of the bigger picture.”
  • A person might overemphasize their own abilities by saying, “I’m the best at everything I do! No one can compare to me!”

31. Overexaggerate

This term is used when someone exaggerates something beyond what is reasonable or necessary.

  • For example, “He always overexaggerates his accomplishments to make himself look better.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s storytelling abilities, one might say, “He tends to overexaggerate the details for dramatic effect.”
  • A person might jokingly say, “Don’t listen to him, he tends to overexaggerate everything.”

32. Overinflate

This term is used when someone exaggerates the importance or value of something.

  • For instance, “She tends to overinflate her own abilities and accomplishments.”
  • In a discussion about a product’s features, someone might say, “The marketing team tends to overinflate the product’s capabilities.”
  • A person might comment, “The media often overinflates the significance of minor events.”

33. Pad out

This term is used when someone adds unnecessary or irrelevant information to make something appear more substantial.

  • For example, “He padded out his essay with irrelevant examples to meet the word count.”
  • In a discussion about a book, someone might say, “The author tends to pad out the story with unnecessary subplots.”
  • A person might comment, “The speaker padded out their presentation with excessive slides and anecdotes.”

34. Stretch the story

This term is used when someone adds fictional or exaggerated elements to a story.

  • For instance, “He always stretches the story to make it more entertaining.”
  • In a discussion about someone’s storytelling abilities, one might say, “She has a tendency to stretch the story for dramatic effect.”
  • A person might comment, “Don’t believe everything he says, he tends to stretch the truth.”

35. Blow it out of proportion

This term is used when someone makes something seem more significant or dramatic than it actually is.

  • For example, “She blew it out of proportion when she found out about the minor mistake.”
  • In a discussion about a small disagreement, someone might say, “He tends to blow things out of proportion and make a big deal out of nothing.”
  • A person might comment, “Let’s not blow this out of proportion, it’s just a minor setback.”

36. Overembellish

To overemphasize or exaggerate something to an extreme degree. This term is used when someone adds excessive or unnecessary details to a story or description.

  • For example, “He tends to overembellish his achievements, making them sound much grander than they actually are.”
  • In a conversation about a fishing trip, someone might say, “Don’t believe him, he always overembellishes the size of the fish he caught.”
  • A friend might tease, “You’re overembellishing the story just to make it more interesting.”