Top 17 Slang For Invested – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to the world of finance and investing, staying up-to-date with the latest lingo is key to understanding the market trends and conversations. Join us as we uncover the most popular and relevant slang terms for the invested community. Whether you’re a seasoned investor or just dipping your toes into the stock market, this listicle is sure to enhance your financial vocabulary and keep you in the loop with the latest jargon.

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1. All in

This phrase is often used to describe someone who is fully committed or heavily invested in a particular endeavor or decision. It signifies a high level of dedication and willingness to take risks.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m going all in on this new business venture. I believe it has great potential.”
  • In a discussion about investing in the stock market, a person might declare, “I’m putting all my savings into this stock. I’m all in.”
  • A poker player might say, “I have a great hand, so I’m going all in and betting everything I have.”

2. Put money on

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of placing a financial bet or investment on a particular outcome or event. It implies confidence in the predicted outcome and a willingness to risk money.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m putting my money on this team to win the championship.”
  • In a discussion about the stock market, a person might state, “I’m putting my money on this company’s stock. I believe it will perform well.”
  • A gambler might declare, “I’m putting money on the roulette table. I have a good feeling about this number.”

3. Bet on

This phrase is similar to “put money on” and is used to describe the act of placing a bet or investment on a particular outcome. It suggests a level of uncertainty or risk, as with any bet or wager.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m betting on this horse to win the race.”
  • In a discussion about investing in startups, a person might state, “I’m betting on this new company to disrupt the industry.”
  • A sports fan might declare, “I’m betting on my favorite team to win the game. I have faith in them.”

4. Bought in

This phrase is commonly used to describe the act of investing or buying into a particular venture, idea, or concept. It implies a level of trust or belief in the potential success of the investment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I bought in early on this cryptocurrency and have seen significant returns.”
  • In a discussion about a new business opportunity, a person might state, “I’m bought in on this idea. I think it has great potential.”
  • An entrepreneur might declare, “I’ve bought in to this franchise model and have opened multiple successful locations.”

5. Got a stake in

This phrase is often used to describe having a financial or personal interest in a particular venture or investment. It suggests ownership or a stake in the success or failure of the venture.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve got a stake in this startup. I’m invested in its success.”
  • In a discussion about a real estate project, a person might state, “I’ve got a stake in this development. I’m looking forward to the returns.”
  • An investor might declare, “I’ve got a stake in this company. I believe in its long-term growth potential.”

6. Took a punt on

This phrase is often used when someone takes a chance on an investment or decision, despite the potential risks involved.

  • For example, “I took a punt on that startup, and it turned out to be a great investment.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m taking a punt on this new cryptocurrency. It could be a game-changer.”
  • Another person might share, “I took a punt on buying a house in that neighborhood, and now it’s booming.”

7. Went long on

This slang term is often used in the context of stock trading or investing in financial markets.

  • For instance, “I went long on that tech stock, and it’s been performing really well.”
  • A trader might say, “I’m going long on gold. I think it’s going to rise in value.”
  • Another investor might mention, “I went long on real estate in that area, and now the prices are skyrocketing.”

8. Got skin in the game

This phrase indicates that someone has a personal interest or investment in a specific situation or outcome.

  • For example, “I’ve got skin in the game with this startup. I’m invested both financially and emotionally.”
  • A business owner might say, “I want my employees to have skin in the game. It motivates them to work harder.”
  • Another person might mention, “I’m putting my own money into this project. I’ve got skin in the game.”

9. Took the plunge on

This slang term is often used when someone takes a significant leap or risk in their investment or decision-making.

  • For instance, “I took the plunge on that new business venture, and it’s paying off.”
  • Someone might say, “I took the plunge on buying that expensive artwork. It was a big financial commitment.”
  • Another person might share, “I took the plunge on investing in cryptocurrency, and it’s been a wild ride.”

10. Went all out on

This phrase indicates that someone has gone to great lengths or made a substantial commitment to a particular investment or endeavor.

  • For example, “I went all out on renovating my house. I spared no expense.”
  • A business owner might say, “We’re going all out on this marketing campaign. We want to make a big impact.”
  • Another person might mention, “I went all out on my education. I studied day and night to achieve my goals.”

11. Skin in the game

This phrase refers to having a personal interest or investment in a particular situation or outcome. It means that someone has something to gain or lose based on the success or failure of a project, venture, or decision.

  • For example, a business owner who invests their own money into a new product has “skin in the game.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, someone might say, “The coach needs to have players with skin in the game to ensure they give their best effort.”
  • A financial advisor might tell a client, “It’s important to have skin in the game when investing to align your interests with the success of the investment.”

12. In the game

This phrase is used to indicate that someone is actively involved or participating in a particular activity or situation. It implies that the person has knowledge, experience, or a personal stake in the matter.

  • For instance, a person who is knowledgeable about the stock market might say, “I’m in the game when it comes to investing.”
  • In a conversation about entrepreneurship, someone might mention, “If you want to succeed in business, you have to be in the game.”
  • A motivational speaker might encourage their audience by saying, “Don’t just watch from the sidelines, get in the game and make things happen!”

13. Money on the line

This phrase refers to having a financial stake or risk in a particular situation or decision. It means that someone has invested their money or has the potential to gain or lose money based on the outcome.

  • For example, a person who invests in a startup has “money on the line.”
  • In a discussion about gambling, someone might say, “When you play poker, there’s always money on the line.”
  • A financial advisor might caution a client, “Before making any investment, consider the potential risks and the amount of money you have on the line.”

14. Put up

This phrase is used to describe the act of contributing or investing something, often money, towards a particular endeavor or project. It implies that someone is willing to take part in the venture.

  • For instance, a group of friends pooling their money together to start a business might say, “We all put up some capital to get the company off the ground.”
  • In a conversation about crowdfunding, someone might mention, “People can put up money to support creative projects they believe in.”
  • A mentor might advise their mentee, “If you want to succeed, you have to be willing to put up your time and resources.”

15. Invested interest

This phrase refers to having a personal stake or involvement in a particular situation or outcome. It means that someone is emotionally or personally invested in the success or failure of something.

  • For example, a parent who volunteers at their child’s school has an “invested interest” in their education.
  • In a discussion about politics, someone might say, “I have an invested interest in the outcome of this election because it directly affects my community.”
  • A motivational speaker might ask their audience, “What are your invested interests in life? What drives you to succeed?”

16. Went in heavy on

This phrase is used to describe someone who has put a large amount of money or resources into a particular investment or venture. It implies a high level of commitment and confidence in the investment.

  • For example, “I went in heavy on that tech stock and it paid off big time.”
  • A person discussing their investment strategy might say, “I always go in heavy on companies that I believe have long-term potential.”
  • Another might say, “I’m considering going in heavy on real estate in the current market.”

17. Went full throttle on

This phrase means to fully commit to an investment or venture without holding back. It implies giving maximum effort and resources towards the investment.

  • For instance, “I went full throttle on my new business and worked around the clock to make it successful.”
  • A person discussing their investment approach might say, “I believe in going full throttle on opportunities that have high growth potential.”
  • Another might say, “I decided to go full throttle on cryptocurrency and invested a significant portion of my savings.”
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