Top 45 Slang For Socialize – Meaning & Usage

In a world where social interactions are key, staying up-to-date with the latest slang for socialize can be a game-changer. Whether you’re hitting up a party or just hanging out with friends, knowing the right lingo can help you navigate conversations with ease. Join us as we break down the trendiest terms that will level up your socializing skills and keep you in the loop!

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1. Hang out

To spend time with someone or a group of people in a relaxed and informal manner.

  • For example, “Let’s hang out at the park this weekend.”
  • A teenager might say, “I’m just going to hang out with my friends after school.”
  • Two coworkers might plan to “hang out for drinks” after work.

2. Chill

To relax and spend time with friends or acquaintances in a low-key and laid-back manner.

  • For instance, “Let’s just chill at home and watch some movies.”
  • A friend might ask, “Wanna chill at the cafe later?”
  • Someone might say, “I love chilling with my friends at the beach.”

3. Kick it

To hang out or spend time with someone in a casual and relaxed manner.

  • For example, “We’re just gonna kick it at my place tonight.”
  • A group of friends might plan to “kick it at the park” on the weekend.
  • Someone might say, “I enjoy kicking it with my buddies and playing video games.”

To meet or connect with someone, usually in a social context.

  • For instance, “Let’s link up for coffee tomorrow.”
  • Two friends might plan to “link up for a workout.”
  • Someone might say, “I need to link up with my old classmates and catch up.”

5. Mix and mingle

To interact and socialize with a variety of people, often in a social gathering or event.

  • For example, “The networking event is a great opportunity to mix and mingle with professionals.”
  • A host might encourage guests to “mix and mingle” at a party.
  • Someone might say, “I’m not the best at mixing and mingling, but I’ll give it a try.”

6. Get together

This phrase is used to describe a casual gathering or meeting of friends or acquaintances. It implies a relaxed and informal atmosphere.

  • For example, “Let’s get together for dinner this weekend and catch up.”
  • A person might say, “We should plan a get together at the park and have a picnic.”
  • When discussing weekend plans, someone might ask, “Are you going to the get together at Sarah’s house?”

7. Party

A party is a social gathering or event where people come together to celebrate, have fun, and socialize. It often involves music, dancing, food, and drinks.

  • For instance, “Let’s throw a party to celebrate your promotion.”
  • Someone might say, “I’m going to a party tonight. Want to come along?”
  • When discussing weekend plans, a person might ask, “Are you going to the party on Saturday?”

8. Network

To network is to interact and establish relationships with people, usually for professional or social purposes. It involves meeting new people, exchanging information, and building connections.

  • For example, “I’m going to a networking event to meet potential clients.”
  • A person might say, “Networking is important for career growth.”
  • When discussing job opportunities, someone might ask, “Do you know anyone I can network with in the industry?”

9. Schmooze

Schmoozing refers to engaging in friendly conversation, often with the intention of gaining favor or social advantage. It involves being charming, flattering, and making small talk.

  • For instance, “He’s always schmoozing with the boss to get ahead.”
  • A person might say, “I’m not good at schmoozing at parties.”
  • When discussing social skills, someone might ask, “Do you have any tips for schmoozing at networking events?”

10. Rub elbows

To rub elbows means to socialize or interact closely with someone, especially those who are influential or important. It implies being in close proximity to someone and engaging in conversation.

  • For example, “He managed to rub elbows with some famous celebrities at the event.”
  • A person might say, “I hope to rub elbows with industry leaders at the conference.”
  • When discussing networking opportunities, someone might ask, “Do you know any events where I can rub elbows with potential investors?”

11. Hobnob

To hobnob means to socialize or mix with people who are of a higher social status or in positions of power or influence.

  • For example, “She loves to hobnob with celebrities at fancy parties.”
  • In a business setting, someone might say, “He’s always hobnobbing with the company executives.”
  • A gossip magazine might report, “The actress was spotted hobnobbing with politicians at a charity event.”

12. Fraternize

Fraternize means to associate or socialize with others, often in a friendly or familiar way.

  • For instance, “He was warned not to fraternize with the enemy during the war.”
  • In a workplace, a supervisor might say, “Employees should not fraternize with clients outside of work.”
  • A news article might report, “The politician was criticized for fraternizing with known criminals.”

13. Converse

To converse means to engage in conversation or discussion with someone.

  • For example, “She enjoys conversing with people from different cultures.”
  • In a social setting, someone might say, “Let’s find a quiet corner and have a nice conversation.”
  • A teacher might encourage students by saying, “Don’t be afraid to converse with your classmates and share your ideas.”

14. Hang with

To hang with means to spend time with someone in a casual or relaxed way.

  • For instance, “I love to hang with my friends at the park.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might say, “I’m just going to hang with my family and relax.”
  • A teenager might text their friend, “Hey, want to hang with me after school?”

15. Mingle

To mingle means to mix or socialize with others, especially at a social gathering or event.

  • For example, “She enjoys mingling with different groups of people at parties.”
  • In a networking event, someone might say, “Make sure to mingle and meet new people.”
  • A party invitation might include the line, “Come and mingle with friends old and new.”

16. Socialize

To socialize means to spend time with others and engage in activities or conversations. It is a way to connect with people and build relationships.

  • For example, “Let’s socialize at the party tonight!”
  • A friend might say, “I haven’t seen you in a while, we should socialize more often.”
  • In a work setting, a colleague might suggest, “We should socialize outside of the office to strengthen our team bond.”

17. Mix it up

To mix it up means to vary one’s routine or change things up in order to experience something different. It often involves trying new activities or meeting new people.

  • For instance, “Let’s mix it up and go to a different restaurant tonight.”
  • A friend might say, “I’m tired of doing the same thing every weekend, let’s mix it up and try something new.”
  • In a conversation about socializing, someone might suggest, “If you want to meet new people, you need to mix it up and join some clubs or organizations.”

18. Be social

To be social means to actively engage with others and participate in social activities. It involves interacting with people, making conversation, and being open to socializing.

  • For example, “Don’t be shy, be social and introduce yourself to new people.”
  • A friend might say, “You’ve been spending too much time alone, you need to be more social.”
  • In a discussion about networking, someone might advise, “If you want to advance in your career, you need to be social and build connections.”

19. Get social

To get social means to start engaging in social activities and connecting with others. It is a way to initiate social interactions and build relationships.

  • For instance, “It’s time to get social and meet new people.”
  • A friend might say, “You’ve been isolating yourself, it’s important to get social and be around others.”
  • In a conversation about making friends, someone might suggest, “Join clubs or groups to get social and meet people with similar interests.”

20. Make connections

To make connections means to form relationships and establish social ties with others. It involves building rapport, finding common ground, and fostering meaningful connections.

  • For example, “Networking events are a great opportunity to make connections.”
  • A friend might say, “You should make connections with people in your industry to expand your professional network.”
  • In a discussion about socializing, someone might advise, “Don’t just meet people, make connections by showing genuine interest and staying in touch.”

21. Throw a party

This phrase means to organize and host a social event or gathering where people come together to socialize and have fun. It can range from a small get-together to a large celebration.

  • For example, “I’m going to throw a party for my birthday next week.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s throw a party to celebrate our graduation.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Why don’t we throw a party to welcome our new neighbors?”

22. Hang around

This term refers to spending time in the company of friends or in a social environment without any specific plans or activities. It implies a relaxed and casual form of socializing.

  • For instance, “I like to hang around with my friends at the local coffee shop.”
  • A teenager might say, “I’m just going to hang around the mall with my friends.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you want to hang around after work and grab a drink?”

23. Get out and about

This phrase means to leave one’s usual surroundings and engage in social activities or interact with other people. It suggests being active and involved in the community.

  • For example, “I need to get out and about more and meet new people.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s get out and about this weekend and explore the city.”
  • Someone might encourage another person by saying, “You should get out and about and join a club or organization.”

24. Get out there

This expression means to actively participate in social events or interact with others. It implies taking initiative and being proactive in meeting new people or engaging in social activities.

  • For instance, “If you want to make new friends, you have to get out there and socialize.”
  • A friend might say, “Don’t be shy, get out there and enjoy yourself.”
  • Someone might advise, “To meet potential romantic partners, you have to get out there and start dating.”

25. Go out and about

This phrase means to leave one’s residence or usual place and participate in social events or activities. It suggests being active and sociable outside of one’s home.

  • For example, “I’m tired of staying home all the time. I need to go out and about more.”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s go out and about this weekend and explore the city.”
  • Someone might suggest, “Instead of watching TV, why don’t you go out and about and enjoy the fresh air?”

26. Throw a shindig

To throw a shindig means to host a lively and festive gathering or party. It is often used to describe a large and enjoyable social event.

  • For example, “I’m going to throw a shindig for my birthday next week, and everyone is invited!”
  • A friend might say, “Let’s throw a shindig to celebrate the end of the semester.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you going to throw a shindig for New Year’s Eve?”

27. Hang out with

To hang out with someone means to spend time together in a casual and relaxed manner. It implies socializing and enjoying each other’s company.

  • For instance, “I love hanging out with my friends at the park on weekends.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s hang out with Lisa after work and grab dinner.”
  • Someone might ask, “Do you want to hang out with us at the mall this weekend?”

28. Get out and mingle

To get out and mingle means to actively engage in social activities and meet new people. It suggests being outgoing and open to interacting with others.

  • For example, “I need to get out and mingle more. I’ve been spending too much time at home.”
  • A friend might say, “You should go to that networking event and get out and mingle with professionals in your field.”
  • Someone might encourage a shy person by saying, “Just get out and mingle. You’ll meet interesting people.”

29. Have a night on the town

To have a night on the town means to go out and have an enjoyable and exciting evening, often involving various social activities.

  • For instance, “Let’s dress up and have a night on the town to celebrate our anniversary.”
  • A person might say, “I haven’t had a night on the town in a while. Let’s go dancing and try new restaurants.”
  • Someone might ask, “Are you up for having a night on the town with me and a few friends?”

30. Be a social butterfly

To be a social butterfly means to be extremely sociable and outgoing, often enjoying and thriving in social situations.

  • For example, “Sarah is always the life of the party. She’s such a social butterfly.”
  • A friend might say, “I envy how easily you can be a social butterfly and make new friends.”
  • Someone might comment, “I need to work on my social skills and be more of a social butterfly.”

31. Get out and socialize

This phrase encourages someone to go out and participate in social events or interact with others.

  • For example, a friend might say, “You’ve been staying in too much. Get out and socialize!”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Put down your phone and go outside to socialize with your friends.”
  • A motivational speaker might say, “Don’t be afraid to get out of your comfort zone and socialize with new people.”

32. Go out and paint the town red

This expression means to go out and have a great time, often involving partying and enjoying oneself to the fullest.

  • For instance, a group of friends might plan to “go out and paint the town red” for a birthday celebration.
  • Someone might say, “I’ve been working hard all week. It’s time to go out and paint the town red this weekend!”
  • A person might use this phrase to describe a memorable night of dancing, drinking, and socializing.
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33. Hit the social circuit

This phrase refers to actively participating in a series of social events or gatherings.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been invited to several parties this week. I’m going to hit the social circuit!”
  • A socialite might be known for regularly hitting the social circuit and attending high-profile events.
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their busy schedule of attending parties, fundraisers, and other social functions.

34. Mix and mingle with

This phrase encourages someone to engage in conversations and social interactions with different people.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “Don’t be shy. Mix and mingle with the other guests at the party!”
  • A networking event might provide opportunities for professionals to mix and mingle with potential clients or business partners.
  • A person might use this phrase to describe their experience of meeting new people and making connections at a social gathering.

35. Paint the town red with

This phrase suggests going out and having an exciting and enjoyable time with a specific person.

  • For example, a couple might plan to “paint the town red” on their anniversary by going out for a fancy dinner, dancing, and exploring the city.
  • Friends might make plans to “paint the town red” for a bachelorette party or a celebration of a milestone.
  • Someone might use this phrase to invite a friend or romantic partner to go out and have a memorable night together.

36. Hang loose

To “hang loose” means to be relaxed and carefree in a social setting. It often implies being open to new experiences and enjoying the company of others.

  • For example, a friend might say, “Let’s just hang loose and have a good time at the party.”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might suggest, “We should hang loose and go to the beach.”
  • A person describing their ideal vacation might say, “I just want to hang loose on a tropical island and forget about all my worries.”

37. Get in touch

To “get in touch” means to contact someone or reconnect with someone, usually to socialize or catch up.

  • For instance, if you haven’t seen a friend in a while, you might say, “We should get in touch and grab coffee.”
  • In a discussion about staying connected with loved ones, someone might recommend, “Make an effort to get in touch with family and friends regularly.”
  • A person sharing their experience might say, “I decided to get in touch with my old high school friends, and it was great to catch up after so many years.”

38. Get in on the fun

To “get in on the fun” means to join an enjoyable activity or event that others are already participating in.

  • For example, if you see a group of people playing a game, you might say, “Can I get in on the fun?”
  • In a conversation about weekend plans, someone might suggest, “Let’s get in on the fun and go to the amusement park.”
  • A person describing their experience at a party might say, “I arrived late, but I still managed to get in on the fun and dance with everyone.”

39. Be a people person

To “be a people person” means to have good social skills and enjoy interacting with others. It implies being friendly, outgoing, and comfortable in social situations.

  • For instance, if someone is known for their ability to make friends easily, you might say, “They’re such a people person.”
  • In a discussion about job requirements, a recruiter might mention, “We’re looking for someone who is a people person and can work well in a team.”
  • A person describing their personality might say, “I’ve always been a people person, and I love meeting new people and hearing their stories.”

40. Live it up

To “live it up” means to enjoy life to the fullest and have a great time, often by engaging in exciting or enjoyable activities.

  • For example, if someone suggests going on a spontaneous trip, you might respond, “Let’s live it up and make some unforgettable memories.”
  • In a conversation about celebrating a milestone, someone might say, “You only turn 30 once, so let’s live it up and have an amazing birthday party.”
  • A person describing their vacation might say, “I decided to take a break from work and live it up on a tropical island for a week.”

41. Be outgoing

Being outgoing means to be sociable and friendly in social situations. It involves actively engaging with others and initiating conversations or activities.

  • For example, “If you want to make new friends, try to be more outgoing and approachable.”
  • In a group setting, someone might say, “She’s always the life of the party and so outgoing.”
  • When encouraging someone to be more sociable, you might say, “Don’t be shy, just be outgoing and introduce yourself to new people.”

42. Be a social magnet

Being a social magnet means to naturally attract others and be the center of attention in social settings. It implies having a magnetic personality that draws people towards you.

  • For instance, “She’s such a social magnet, everyone wants to be around her.”
  • When describing someone who is popular and well-liked, you might say, “He’s a social magnet, always surrounded by people.”
  • If someone is seeking advice on how to be more popular, you could suggest, “Try to be a social magnet by being friendly and approachable.”

43. Be a social guru

Being a social guru means to be highly knowledgeable and skilled in social interactions. It implies having expertise in navigating social situations and understanding social dynamics.

  • For example, “She’s a social guru who always knows the right thing to say.”
  • When complimenting someone on their social skills, you might say, “He’s a social guru, he can make anyone feel comfortable.”
  • If someone is seeking advice on how to improve their social interactions, you could suggest, “Become a social guru by observing and learning from others.”

44. Be a social chameleon

Being a social chameleon means to adapt and blend in with different social groups. It implies being able to change one’s behavior, interests, or appearance to fit in with different social contexts.

  • For instance, “She’s a social chameleon, she can easily connect with people from all walks of life.”
  • When describing someone who is versatile in social situations, you might say, “He’s a social chameleon, he can fit in anywhere.”
  • If someone wants to be more adaptable in social settings, you could suggest, “Try to be a social chameleon by observing and mirroring the behavior of others.”

45. Be a social pro

Being a social pro means to be highly skilled and proficient in socializing. It implies having a natural talent or acquired expertise in interacting with others.

  • For example, “She’s a social pro, she can strike up a conversation with anyone.”
  • When complimenting someone on their social skills, you might say, “He’s a social pro, always knowing the right thing to say.”
  • If someone is seeking advice on how to improve their social interactions, you could suggest, “Become a social pro by practicing active listening and empathy.”