Top 51 Slang For Job – Meaning & Usage

In the fast-paced world of work, staying updated with the latest slang for job can give you an edge in conversations with colleagues and potential employers. Whether you’re a seasoned professional or just starting out, our team has curated a list of trendy terms that will keep you in the loop and help you navigate the ever-evolving workplace lingo. Get ready to level up your career vocabulary and show off your industry knowledge with confidence!

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1. Gig

A “gig” refers to a short-term job or project, often in the entertainment or creative industry. It can also be used to describe any temporary or freelance work.

  • For example, “I’m playing a gig at a local bar tonight.”
  • A freelancer might say, “I just landed a new gig designing a website.”
  • Someone discussing their part-time job might say, “I have a gig as a barista on the weekends.”

2. Hustle

To “hustle” means to work hard, often in a determined and ambitious way. It can also refer to taking advantage of opportunities to make money or achieve success.

  • For instance, “I’m hustling to finish this project before the deadline.”
  • A person discussing their side business might say, “I’m hustling to grow my online store.”
  • Someone talking about their career goals might say, “I’m ready to hustle and climb the corporate ladder.”

3. Grind

The term “grind” refers to working persistently and tirelessly towards a goal. It often implies a continuous effort and dedication to achieve success.

  • For example, “I’ve been grinding at the gym to get in shape.”
  • A student studying for exams might say, “I’m in grind mode right now.”
  • Someone discussing their career might say, “I’ve been on the grind, trying to get a promotion.”

4. Nine-to-five

“Nine-to-five” refers to a typical full-time job with regular working hours, usually from 9 AM to 5 PM. It can also be used to describe a traditional and predictable work routine.

  • For instance, “I have a nine-to-five job at a corporate office.”
  • A person discussing work-life balance might say, “I’m tired of the nine-to-five grind.”
  • Someone describing their daily routine might say, “I wake up, go to my nine-to-five, and then relax in the evenings.”

5. Breadwinner

A “breadwinner” is the person who earns the majority or main source of income for a household. It is often used to describe the financial responsibility and provider role within a family.

  • For example, “My dad was the breadwinner in our family.”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I want to be a successful breadwinner for my future family.”
  • Someone talking about gender roles might say, “Traditionally, men were expected to be the breadwinners.”

6. Daily grind

This term refers to the monotonous and repetitive nature of everyday work. It implies that work can feel like a never-ending cycle that lacks excitement or fulfillment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m tired of the daily grind. I need a vacation.”
  • A person might complain, “I wake up, go to work, come home, and repeat. It’s just the daily grind.”
  • In a conversation about work-life balance, someone might mention, “Finding hobbies outside of work helps break up the daily grind.”

7. J-O-B

This term is often used to refer to a job in a casual or informal way. It is sometimes spelled out as individual letters, emphasizing the idea of work without explicitly naming a specific occupation.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to find a new J-O-B. This one isn’t cutting it.”
  • A person might complain, “I’ve been looking for a J-O-B for months, but no luck.”
  • In a conversation about career aspirations, someone might mention, “I’m ready to move on from my current J-O-B and pursue something more fulfilling.”

8. Career

This term refers to a person’s long-term professional journey or occupation. It implies a sense of progression and development in one’s chosen field.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m focused on building a successful career in finance.”
  • A person might discuss their career goals, saying, “I want to climb the corporate ladder and reach the top of my career.”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might mention, “Finding a career that aligns with your passions is key to long-term happiness.”

9. Occupation

This term is a general way to refer to a person’s job or profession. It encompasses a wide range of work and can be used to describe any type of employment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a new occupation as a graphic designer.”
  • A person might discuss their occupation, saying, “I work in the medical field. It’s a rewarding occupation.”
  • In a conversation about job security, someone might mention, “Automation is threatening many traditional occupations.”

10. Vocation

This term refers to a person’s strong inclination or calling towards a specific career path. It implies a sense of purpose and passion in one’s chosen field.

  • For example, someone might say, “Teaching is not just a job for me; it’s my vocation.”
  • A person might discuss their vocation, saying, “I feel fulfilled knowing that I’m pursuing my true vocation.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might mention, “It’s important to find a vocation that aligns with your values and interests.”

11. Livelihood

This term refers to the way in which a person earns money to support themselves and their family. It encompasses the various activities or occupations that generate income.

  • For example, someone might say, “Fishing is his livelihood. It’s how he puts food on the table.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, one might mention, “I want to pursue a livelihood that aligns with my passion.”
  • A person reflecting on their job might say, “I’m grateful for my livelihood, even though it can be challenging at times.”

12. Employment

This term refers to the state of being employed or having a job. It can also refer to the act of hiring someone for work or the condition of being hired.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m seeking employment in the tech industry.”
  • In a conversation about the economy, one might mention, “The unemployment rate is a key indicator of the country’s economic health.”
  • A person discussing job opportunities might say, “There are various employment options available in this field.”

13. Trade

This term refers to a particular occupation or profession that requires specialized skills and knowledge. It often involves manual or technical work that requires training or apprenticeship.

  • For example, someone might say, “He learned the trade of carpentry from his father.”
  • In a discussion about job prospects, one might mention, “The demand for skilled tradespeople is on the rise.”
  • A person discussing career paths might say, “I’m considering entering the trade industry because I enjoy working with my hands.”

14. Craft

This term refers to a skilled occupation or profession that requires expertise and craftsmanship. It often involves working with one’s hands and requires specialized knowledge and skills.

  • For instance, someone might say, “She has mastered the craft of pottery.”
  • In a conversation about traditional arts, one might mention, “Many indigenous cultures have rich craft traditions.”
  • A person discussing career choices might say, “I want to pursue a craft that allows me to express my creativity.”

15. Calling

This term refers to a strong inner desire or sense of purpose to pursue a particular occupation or career. It often implies a deep passion or conviction about one’s chosen path.

  • For example, someone might say, “Teaching is her calling. She has always had a natural talent for it.”
  • In a discussion about finding fulfillment in work, one might mention, “Many people search for their true calling.”
  • A person reflecting on their career might say, “I feel fortunate to have found my calling. It brings me joy and a sense of purpose.”

16. Profession

This refers to a specific occupation or career that requires specialized knowledge or skills. It is often used to describe a person’s chosen field of work.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been in the teaching profession for over 10 years.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, one might ask, “What profession are you considering?”
  • A person discussing their job satisfaction might say, “I love my profession because it allows me to help others.”

17. Work

This is a general term used to describe any type of employment or task that requires effort. It can refer to both paid and unpaid work.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have a lot of work to do today.”
  • In a conversation about different occupations, one might ask, “What kind of work do you do?”
  • A person discussing their workload might say, “I’ve been working long hours lately.”

18. Position

This refers to a specific job or title within a company or organization. It indicates the responsibilities and duties associated with a particular role.

  • For example, someone might say, “I recently got promoted to a management position.”
  • In a conversation about job openings, one might ask, “What positions are currently available?”
  • A person discussing their career progression might say, “I’ve worked my way up from an entry-level position to a leadership role.”

19. Duty

This refers to a task or obligation that one is expected to perform as part of their job. It indicates the specific duties and responsibilities associated with a particular role.

  • For instance, someone might say, “It’s my duty to ensure the safety of all employees.”
  • In a conversation about job descriptions, one might ask, “What are the main duties of this position?”
  • A person discussing their work ethic might say, “I take my duties and responsibilities very seriously.”

20. Labor

This refers to physical or mental effort that is required to complete a task or job. It often implies that the work is demanding or challenging.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ve been putting in a lot of labor to meet the project deadline.”
  • In a conversation about manual jobs, one might ask, “Do you enjoy working with your hands and doing physical labor?”
  • A person discussing their work ethic might say, “I believe in the value of hard labor and putting in the effort to achieve results.”

21. Employment opportunity

This term refers to a potential job or position that is available for someone to apply for. It is often used in a formal or professional context.

  • For example, a company might advertise, “We have several employment opportunities in our marketing department.”
  • A job seeker might say, “I’m actively looking for employment opportunities in the tech industry.”
  • In a conversation about job prospects, someone might ask, “Have you heard of any good employment opportunities lately?”

22. Job opportunity

This term is similar to “employment opportunity” and refers to a chance or possibility for someone to get a job. It can be used in a more casual or informal context.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I heard about a job opportunity at the local coffee shop.”
  • A person searching for work might ask, “Do you know of any job opportunities in the hospitality industry?”
  • In a discussion about the current job market, someone might comment, “There seem to be fewer job opportunities in certain sectors.”

23. Work opportunity

This term is another way to describe a potential job or employment prospect. It emphasizes the opportunity to work and earn a living.

  • For example, a career counselor might say, “We have various work opportunities available for recent graduates.”
  • A person looking for part-time employment might ask, “Are there any work opportunities that offer flexible hours?”
  • In a conversation about job satisfaction, someone might say, “I’m looking for a work opportunity that aligns with my passion for environmental conservation.”

24. Career path

This term refers to the sequence of jobs or positions that a person takes throughout their career. It encompasses the different stages and directions that someone’s professional life can take.

  • For instance, a mentor might advise, “It’s important to choose a career path that aligns with your skills and interests.”
  • A person considering a career change might say, “I’m exploring different career paths in the healthcare industry.”
  • In a discussion about long-term goals, someone might ask, “What steps can I take to advance in my career path?”

25. Job market

This term refers to the overall conditions and trends in the availability of jobs and the demand for workers. It encompasses factors such as job growth, unemployment rates, and the competitiveness of the job market.

  • For example, a news article might state, “The job market is currently experiencing a downturn due to the economic recession.”
  • A person preparing for a job interview might research, “What skills are in high demand in today’s job market?”
  • In a conversation about career prospects, someone might comment, “It’s important to stay informed about the job market to make strategic career decisions.”

26. Workforce

This term refers to the group of people who are employed or available for employment. It can also refer to the labor market as a whole.

  • For example, “The workforce is facing significant changes due to automation.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, one might say, “The workforce is highly competitive in this industry.”
  • A news article might report, “The workforce is demanding better working conditions and higher wages.”

27. Job sector

This term refers to a specific field or industry in which people work. It is often used to categorize different types of jobs.

  • For instance, “The technology job sector is experiencing rapid growth.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might say, “I’m considering a job in the healthcare sector.”
  • A job listing might specify, “Experience in the financial sector is preferred.”

28. Job field

Similar to “job sector,” this term refers to a specific field or industry in which people work. It is often used interchangeably with “job sector.”

  • For example, “She has extensive experience in the education job field.”
  • In a discussion about job opportunities, one might ask, “Which job field are you interested in?”
  • A career counselor might advise, “Consider exploring different job fields to find your passion.”

29. Job marketability

This term refers to how desirable or marketable a person’s skills and qualifications are to potential employers. It indicates the likelihood of finding a job or being hired.

  • For instance, “His job marketability increased after completing an internship.”
  • In a conversation about career development, someone might say, “Improving your job marketability requires continuous learning and skill development.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “What can I do to enhance my job marketability?”

30. Job prospects

This term refers to the potential or likelihood of finding employment or career opportunities in a specific field or industry.

  • For example, “The job prospects for software engineers are very promising.”
  • In a discussion about job trends, someone might say, “The job prospects in renewable energy are expected to grow.”
  • A recent graduate might inquire, “What are the job prospects for entry-level positions in this field?”

31. Job search

The process of actively looking for employment. It involves researching job opportunities, submitting applications, and attending interviews.

  • For example, “I’ve been on a job search for months and still haven’t found the right fit.”
  • A friend might ask, “How’s your job search going? Any luck?”
  • A job seeker might say, “I’m using various job search websites to find potential opportunities.”

32. Job interview

A formal conversation between a job applicant and a representative of a company or organization. The purpose of the interview is to assess the applicant’s qualifications, skills, and suitability for the job.

  • For instance, “I have a job interview tomorrow for a position at a marketing agency.”
  • A candidate might prepare for an interview by researching the company and practicing common interview questions.
  • Someone might say, “I aced the job interview and got an offer on the spot!”

33. Job application

A document or online form that individuals complete to apply for a job. It typically includes personal information, work history, education, and references.

  • For example, “I filled out a job application for a position at a local restaurant.”
  • A friend might ask, “Have you submitted your job application yet?”
  • A job seeker might say, “I’m applying to multiple jobs, so I’ve been filling out job applications all week.”

34. Job offer

An official offer extended to a candidate by an employer, inviting them to join the company and outlining the terms of employment, such as salary, benefits, and start date.

  • For instance, “I received a job offer from my dream company!”
  • A candidate might negotiate the terms of a job offer, such as asking for a higher salary or additional benefits.
  • Someone might say, “I accepted the job offer and will start next month.”

35. Job description

A written document that outlines the duties, requirements, and expectations of a specific job. It provides potential applicants with information about the role and helps employers attract qualified candidates.

  • For example, “I read the job description and realized it’s a perfect fit for my skills.”
  • A recruiter might say, “The job description clearly states the qualifications we’re looking for in a candidate.”
  • A job seeker might say, “I’m reviewing multiple job descriptions to find the right position for me.”

36. Job satisfaction

Job satisfaction refers to how content and fulfilled a person feels in their job. It is a measure of how well their expectations and needs are being met in their work environment.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have high job satisfaction because I love the work I do and the company I work for.”
  • A person discussing their career might mention, “Job satisfaction is important to me because I want to feel fulfilled in my work.”
  • A manager might ask their team, “What can we do to improve job satisfaction and create a positive work environment?”

37. Job security

Job security refers to the assurance that one’s job is stable and there is a low risk of losing it. It is a measure of how confident a person feels about the longevity of their employment.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I value job security because I want to feel stable and financially secure.”
  • A person discussing the economy might mention, “Job security is a concern for many people during times of economic uncertainty.”
  • An employee might ask their supervisor, “What measures are in place to ensure job security during this restructuring?”

38. Job performance

Job performance refers to the level of effectiveness and efficiency with which a person carries out their job responsibilities. It is a measure of their productivity, quality of work, and ability to meet goals and objectives.

  • For example, a supervisor might say, “John’s job performance has been exceptional. He consistently exceeds expectations.”
  • A person discussing their career growth might mention, “Improving job performance is essential for advancing in my field.”
  • An employee might ask for feedback, “How can I improve my job performance and contribute more to the team?”

39. Job promotion

Job promotion refers to the elevation of an employee to a higher position or rank within an organization. It is a recognition of their skills, experience, and contributions, and often comes with increased responsibilities and benefits.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’m working hard to earn a job promotion and take on more leadership responsibilities.”
  • A person discussing their career goals might mention, “Job promotion is an important milestone in my professional development.”
  • An employee might ask their supervisor, “What can I do to increase my chances of getting a job promotion?”

40. Job training

Job training refers to the process of acquiring knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary for performing job tasks effectively. It can involve formal training programs, on-the-job training, or self-directed learning.

  • For example, a new employee might say, “I’m excited to start my job training and learn the ropes.”
  • A person discussing career development might mention, “Continuous job training is crucial for staying relevant in a rapidly changing job market.”
  • An employee might request additional training, “I would like to attend a job training workshop to enhance my skills in this area.”

41. Job benefits

These are the additional advantages or rewards that come with a job, in addition to the salary. Job benefits can include health insurance, retirement plans, paid time off, and more.

  • For example, “This company offers great job benefits, including a generous vacation policy and tuition reimbursement.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “What are the job benefits like at this company?”
  • An employee might say, “I love my job benefits – the health insurance coverage is excellent.”

42. Job perks

Similar to job benefits, job perks are additional advantages or rewards that come with a job. However, job perks are often smaller, more specific, or non-essential benefits that can make a job more enjoyable or convenient.

  • For instance, “One of the job perks at this company is free snacks in the break room.”
  • An employee might mention, “One of the job perks here is the casual dress code.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “What are the job perks of working for this company?”

43. Job requirements

These are the skills, experience, or education that are necessary for a particular job. Job requirements are the criteria that employers use to evaluate potential candidates.

  • For example, “The job requirements for this position include a bachelor’s degree and at least 3 years of relevant experience.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “What are the job requirements for this role?”
  • An employer might state, “We are looking for candidates who meet the job requirements outlined in the job description.”

44. 9 to 5

This phrase refers to a typical work schedule that starts at 9:00 AM and ends at 5:00 PM. It is often used to describe a traditional full-time job with set working hours.

  • For instance, “I’m tired of working a 9 to 5 job. I want more flexibility in my schedule.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer working a 9 to 5 job because it allows me to have evenings and weekends free.”
  • A job seeker might ask, “Is this position a 9 to 5 job or are there different working hours?”

45. Line of work

This phrase refers to a person’s specific field or industry of employment. It is used to describe the type of work that someone is engaged in.

  • For example, “I’m in the healthcare line of work, specifically as a nurse.”
  • Someone might ask, “What line of work are you in?”
  • A person might say, “I’ve been in the line of work for over 20 years and have seen many changes in the industry.”

46. Bread and butter

This phrase refers to a person’s main or primary source of income. It is often used to describe a job or profession that provides steady and reliable income.

  • For example, someone might say, “My bread and butter is my job as a teacher.”
  • In a discussion about career choices, one might say, “I need to find a bread and butter job to pay the bills.”
  • A person might refer to their job as their bread and butter when discussing financial stability.
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47. Daily bread

This phrase refers to the income or resources needed for basic survival and sustenance. It is often used to emphasize the importance of a job or income in meeting one’s basic needs.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I work hard to earn my daily bread.”
  • In a conversation about financial struggles, one might say, “I’m just trying to earn my daily bread and support my family.”
  • A person might mention their daily bread when discussing the necessity of working to meet their basic needs.

48. Jobber

A jobber is someone who takes on various odd jobs or temporary positions, often without long-term job security or stability.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ve been working as a jobber, taking on different gigs to make ends meet.”
  • In a discussion about flexible employment, one might say, “Being a jobber allows me to have a more varied work experience.”
  • A person might refer to themselves as a jobber when discussing their experience in the gig economy.

49. Day job

A day job refers to a person’s regular or primary employment, typically during standard working hours.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I work a day job as a receptionist and pursue my passion for art in the evenings.”
  • In a conversation about balancing work and personal life, one might say, “My day job pays the bills, but my true passion lies in my side projects.”
  • A person might mention their day job when discussing their routine or schedule.

50. Nine-to-fiver

A nine-to-fiver refers to someone who works regular office hours, typically from 9 AM to 5 PM. It is often used to describe individuals with traditional desk jobs.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m just a nine-to-fiver, stuck in the daily grind.”
  • In a discussion about work-life balance, one might say, “I envy those who can escape the nine-to-five routine.”
  • A person might refer to themselves as a nine-to-fiver when discussing their job and daily schedule.
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51. Daily job

This term refers to a job or occupation that is performed on a daily basis, typically with set hours and responsibilities.

  • For example, someone might say, “I have a daily job as a teacher, Monday through Friday.”
  • In a conversation about work, a person might ask, “Do you prefer having a daily job or working freelance?”
  • A person discussing their career might say, “I’ve been looking for a stable daily job with good benefits.”