Top 47 Slang For Kangaroo – Meaning & Usage

Kangaroos, with their powerful hind legs and distinctive pouches, are iconic symbols of Australia. But did you know that there are slang terms used to refer to these fascinating creatures? In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang words for kangaroo that will have you hopping with excitement. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just curious about the quirky side of Australian slang, this article is sure to entertain and educate you. So, let’s dive in and explore the colorful world of kangaroo slang!

Click above to generate some slangs

1. Boomer

This term is commonly used to refer to a fully grown kangaroo. It is derived from the word “boomerang,” which is a traditional Australian throwing weapon.

  • For example, a wildlife enthusiast might say, “Look at that massive boomer hopping around in the field.”
  • In a conversation about Australian wildlife, someone might ask, “Have you ever seen a boomer up close?”
  • A tourist visiting Australia might exclaim, “I can’t wait to see a boomer in the wild!”

2. Joey

This word is used to describe a young kangaroo, typically still in its mother’s pouch. It is a common term for baby marsupials in general.

  • For instance, a nature documentary might feature a segment on joeys and their development.
  • A wildlife photographer might say, “I captured a beautiful photo of a joey peeking out of its mother’s pouch.”
  • In a discussion about kangaroo conservation, someone might mention, “Protecting joeys is crucial for the survival of the species.”

3. Kangarella

This term is a playful variation of the word “kangaroo” and specifically refers to a female kangaroo. It is not as commonly used as other slang terms for kangaroos.

  • For example, in a children’s book about Australian animals, the protagonist might encounter a friendly kangarella.
  • Someone discussing the behavior of female kangaroos might say, “Kangarellas are known for their nurturing nature.”
  • In a lighthearted conversation about kangaroos, someone might ask, “What’s the proper term for a female kangaroo? Kangarella?”

4. Keely

This term is used to refer to the tail of a kangaroo. It is a lesser-known slang term and may not be widely recognized.

  • For instance, a zoologist might explain, “The keely of a kangaroo acts as a counterbalance while hopping.”
  • In a discussion about kangaroo anatomy, someone might ask, “What is the purpose of the keely?”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “The keely adds to the kangaroo’s unique appearance.”

5. Roo

This slang term is a common abbreviation for “kangaroo.” It is widely recognized and used in various contexts.

  • For example, a person visiting Australia might say, “I saw a kangaroo, or as the locals call it, a roo!”
  • In a conversation about Australian wildlife, someone might mention, “Roo sightings are quite common in the Outback.”
  • A nature lover might exclaim, “I can’t wait to see a roo in its natural habitat!”

6. Skippy

Skippy is a common nickname for kangaroos, especially in Australia. It is often used in a playful or affectionate manner.

  • For example, “Look at that cute little Skippy hopping around!”
  • A tourist might say, “I can’t wait to see a real-life Skippy in the wild.”
  • A local might mention, “Skippies are a common sight in the outback.”

7. Bouncy mouse

Bouncy mouse is a humorous term used to describe kangaroos. It highlights their unique hopping movement and likens them to a small, energetic rodent.

  • For instance, “Did you see that bouncy mouse hopping across the field?”
  • Someone might joke, “Kangaroos are just giant bouncy mice!”
  • A child might excitedly exclaim, “Look, Mom! A bouncy mouse!”

8. Macropod

Macropod is a scientific term used to categorize kangaroos and other related marsupials. It refers to their large hind legs, which are adapted for hopping.

  • For example, “Kangaroos are part of the macropod family.”
  • A biologist might say, “Macropods are fascinating creatures with unique adaptations.”
  • A nature enthusiast might mention, “Australia is home to several species of macropods.”

9. Buck

Buck is a slang term used to refer to a male kangaroo. It is similar to the term “buck” used for male deer.

  • For instance, “Look at that massive buck bounding across the field!”
  • A wildlife guide might point out, “The bucks are usually larger and more muscular than the females.”
  • A nature photographer might say, “I managed to capture a stunning photo of a buck in mid-hop.”

10. Doe

Doe is a slang term used to refer to a female kangaroo. It is similar to the term “doe” used for female deer.

  • For example, “The doe and her joey hopped away into the bush.”
  • A wildlife researcher might mention, “Female kangaroos, or does, play a crucial role in the kangaroo population.”
  • A nature lover might say, “Watching a doe with her young is a heartwarming sight.”

11. Flyer

This term refers to a kangaroo, which is a large marsupial native to Australia. It is used to describe the animal itself.

  • For example, “Look at that flyer hopping across the field.”
  • In a discussion about Australian wildlife, someone might say, “The flyer is a unique and iconic symbol of Australia.”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “I’ve always wanted to see a flyer up close in its natural habitat.”

12. Jack

This term specifically refers to a male kangaroo. It is used to differentiate between male and female kangaroos.

  • For instance, “There goes a jack bounding through the bush.”
  • In a conversation about kangaroo behavior, someone might mention, “Jacks are known for their powerful kicks.”
  • A wildlife expert might explain, “Male kangaroos, or jacks, often engage in boxing matches to establish dominance.”

13. Old man

This term is slang for a senior or older kangaroo. It is used to describe a kangaroo that has reached an advanced age.

  • For example, “Look at that old man grazing peacefully in the meadow.”
  • In a discussion about kangaroo lifespan, someone might say, “Old men kangaroos can live up to 20 years in the wild.”
  • A nature lover might comment, “It’s fascinating to observe the wisdom and experience of old man kangaroos.”

14. Jill

This term specifically refers to a female kangaroo. It is used to differentiate between male and female kangaroos.

  • For instance, “There goes a jill with her joey in her pouch.”
  • In a conversation about kangaroo reproduction, someone might mention, “Jills have a unique reproductive system.”
  • A wildlife expert might explain, “Female kangaroos, or jills, play a crucial role in the kangaroo population.”

15. Mob

This term is used to describe a group of kangaroos. It refers to a social gathering or congregation of kangaroos.

  • For example, “Look at that mob grazing together in the field.”
  • In a discussion about kangaroo behavior, someone might say, “Kangaroos often travel in mobs for protection.”
  • A nature enthusiast might comment, “Witnessing a mob of kangaroos in the wild is a spectacular sight.”

16. Pouchie

This term refers to a baby kangaroo, as kangaroos are known for carrying their young in a pouch. “Pouchie” is a cute and affectionate way to refer to a baby kangaroo.

  • For example, a wildlife enthusiast might say, “Look at that adorable pouchie peeking out of its mother’s pouch!”
  • In a children’s book about kangaroos, the author might write, “The little pouchie hopped around, exploring its new world.”
  • A zoologist might explain, “Pouchies spend the majority of their early life inside their mother’s pouch, where they are protected and nourished.”

17. Pogo

This slang term refers to the jumping action of kangaroos. It is used to describe any kind of jumping or bouncing movement.

  • For instance, someone might say, “That kangaroo is really pogoing around the field.”
  • In a discussion about exercise, a fitness enthusiast might mention, “Jumping on a pogo stick is a fun way to get your heart rate up.”
  • A child playing on a trampoline might exclaim, “I feel like a kangaroo on a pogo stick!”

18. Hopster

This slang term combines the words “hop” (referring to the hopping movement of kangaroos) and “hipster” (a term for someone who is trendy and unconventional). It is used to describe someone who loves kangaroos or is fascinated by them.

  • For example, a person who has a kangaroo-themed room might be called a “hopster.”
  • In a conversation about favorite animals, someone might say, “I’m a total hopster – kangaroos are my spirit animal.”
  • A traveler who has visited Australia might proudly declare, “I’m officially a hopster after seeing kangaroos up close!”

19. Kanga-roo

This slang term is a playful and informal way to refer to a kangaroo. It is often used in a lighthearted or affectionate manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Look at that cute little kanga-roo hopping around!”
  • In a children’s cartoon featuring kangaroos, a character might say, “G’day, mate! I’m a friendly kanga-roo.”
  • A tourist visiting Australia might excitedly exclaim, “I can’t wait to see a real-life kanga-roo!”

20. Roo-dude

This slang term combines the words “roo” (a shortened form of “kangaroo”) and “dude” (a casual term for a friend or person). It is used to refer to a kangaroo in a friendly and informal way.

  • For example, someone might say, “Hey, roo-dude, want to hop around the park with me?”
  • In a conversation about unique animals, a person might mention, “Kangaroos are like the roo-dudes of the animal kingdom.”
  • A child pretending to be a kangaroo might say, “I’m a roo-dude, the fastest hopper in the neighborhood!”

21. Skip

In Australian slang, “skip” is a shortened form of “kangaroo.” It is commonly used to refer to kangaroos in a casual or colloquial manner.

  • For example, “Look at that skip hopping across the field!”
  • A tourist might ask, “Where can I see some skips in the wild?”
  • A local might say, “Watch out for skips on the road when driving at night.”

22. Big red

The term “big red” is a slang term used to refer to the red kangaroo, the largest kangaroo species and the most iconic symbol of Australia.

  • For instance, “We spotted a big red grazing in the outback.”
  • A wildlife enthusiast might say, “The big red is known for its powerful hind legs and distinctive coloring.”
  • A traveler might ask, “Are there any tours where I can see the big red up close?”

23. Grey

The term “grey” is a slang term used to refer to the eastern grey kangaroo, a common kangaroo species found in eastern Australia.

  • For example, “We saw a mob of greys while hiking in the national park.”
  • A nature lover might say, “The grey kangaroo is known for its gentle nature and graceful hopping.”
  • A photographer might ask, “Where is the best place to capture greys in their natural habitat?”

24. Wallaby

In Australian slang, “wallaby” is used to refer to various smaller kangaroo species that belong to the same family. Wallabies are similar to kangaroos but are generally smaller in size.

  • For instance, “We spotted a wallaby with its joey in its pouch.”
  • A wildlife enthusiast might say, “Wallabies are agile and can easily navigate through dense vegetation.”
  • A hiker might ask, “Are there any wallaby colonies in this area?”

25. Wombat

Although not a kangaroo, the term “wombat” is sometimes used in Australian slang to refer to kangaroos, particularly in a playful or humorous context.

  • For example, “Look at that wombat hopping around like a kangaroo!”
  • A local might say, “I saw a group of wombats… I mean kangaroos… in the field.”
  • A tourist might ask, “Do wombats and kangaroos live in the same habitats?”

26. Macca

This term is a nickname for a kangaroo, often used in Australia. It is derived from the word “macropod,” which is the scientific term for kangaroos and wallabies.

  • For example, a local might say, “Look at that macca hopping around in the field.”
  • A tourist might ask, “Where can I see a macca in the wild?”
  • In a conversation about Australian wildlife, someone might mention, “The macca is an iconic symbol of the country.”

27. Skippy the bush kangaroo

Skippy the Bush Kangaroo was a popular Australian TV show that aired from 1968 to 1970. The show featured a kangaroo named Skippy who would often help solve problems or save the day.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I used to love watching Skippy the Bush Kangaroo when I was a kid.”
  • In a discussion about classic TV shows, a person might mention, “Skippy the Bush Kangaroo was a beloved character in Australian television.”
  • A fan of the show might reminisce, “Skippy the Bush Kangaroo was my hero growing up.”

28. Hoppy

This term is used to describe the way kangaroos hop, as it is their primary form of locomotion. It is often used to highlight their unique way of moving.

  • For example, someone might say, “Look at that hoppy kangaroo bouncing across the field.”
  • In a conversation about animal adaptations, a person might mention, “Kangaroos have developed a hoppy gait that allows them to conserve energy.”
  • A child learning about animals might ask, “Why do kangaroos hop instead of walk like other animals?”

29. Roo-dog

This term is a slang nickname for a kangaroo, combining the words “roo” (short for kangaroo) and “dog” to create a playful term.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Watch out for that roo-dog crossing the road.”
  • In a discussion about Australian wildlife, a person might mention, “The roo-dog is a unique and fascinating animal.”
  • A local might use the term affectionately, saying, “I spotted a cute little roo-dog in my backyard this morning.”

30. Bush Kangaroo

This term is used to refer to a kangaroo that lives in the bush or wild areas, as opposed to captivity or urban environments.

  • For example, someone might say, “I saw a bush kangaroo while hiking in the national park.”
  • In a conversation about wildlife conservation, a person might mention, “It’s important to protect the habitats of bush kangaroos.”
  • A nature enthusiast might share, “Spotting a bush kangaroo in its natural habitat is a thrilling experience.”