Top 66 Slang For Later – Meaning & Usage

We all know the struggle of trying to keep up with the ever-evolving world of slang. “Slang For Later” is here to save the day! Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to stay in the know, our team has curated a list of the trendiest and most current slang terms that you can add to your vocabulary. Stay ahead of the curve and impress your friends with this handy guide to the latest linguistic trends.

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1. L8R

This is a shorthand way of saying “later” and is commonly used in text messages or online conversations to indicate that the person will talk or see someone at a later time.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I’ll meet you at the coffee shop L8R.”
  • Someone might send a text message saying, “Gotta go now, but we can chat L8R.”
  • Another person might comment on a social media post, “Looks like fun! Wish I could join, but I have work. Catch up L8R!”

2. TTYL

This phrase is used to indicate that the person will talk to the other person at a later time. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I have to go now. TTYL!”
  • Someone might send a text message saying, “I’ll be busy for a while. TTYL.”
  • Another person might comment on a social media post, “Looks like a great party! Enjoy and TTYL!”

3. BRB

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be away temporarily and will return shortly. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, a friend might say, “BRB, need to grab a drink.”
  • Someone might send a text message saying, “BRB, just need to answer the door.”
  • Another person might comment on a social media post, “I’m cooking dinner. BRB!”

4. CYA

This phrase is a casual way of saying goodbye and is commonly used to indicate that the person will see the other person at a later time.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I have to go now. CYA!”
  • Someone might send a text message saying, “I’ll be back soon. CYA.”
  • Another person might comment on a social media post, “Have a great day! CYA later!”

5. GTG

This acronym is used to indicate that the person needs to leave or end the conversation. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I have to go now. GTG!”
  • Someone might send a text message saying, “GTG, talk to you later.”
  • Another person might comment on a social media post, “Looks fun, but I’ve got to go. GTG!”

6. BBL

This acronym is used to indicate that the person will be away for a period of time and will return later. It is often used in online chats or text messages.

  • For example, “I need to go run some errands, BBL!”
  • A person might say, “I’m going to grab some lunch, BBL!”
  • Another might comment, “I have a meeting to attend, BBL!”

7. TTFN

This phrase is a playful way of saying goodbye for now. It is often used to indicate that the person will be leaving but intends to return at a later time.

  • For instance, “I have to go pick up my kids from school, TTFN!”
  • A person might say, “I’m signing off for the day, TTFN!”
  • Another might comment, “I’ll be back online after dinner, TTFN!”

8. CUL8R

This phrase is a shorthand way of saying “see you later.” It is often used to bid farewell to someone with the expectation of meeting again in the future.

  • For example, “I have to go to work now, CUL8R!”
  • A person might say, “I’ll catch up with you at the party tonight, CUL8R!”
  • Another might comment, “I’m off to the gym, CUL8R!”

9. TBC

This acronym is used to indicate that something will be continued or completed at a later time. It is often used in storytelling or to suggest that there is more to come.

  • For instance, “The story will be continued in the next chapter, TBC.”
  • A person might say, “We’ll discuss the details of the project in the next meeting, TBC.”
  • Another might comment, “The mystery will be solved in the upcoming episodes, TBC.”

10. TBD

This acronym is used to indicate that something has not yet been decided or finalized. It is often used when the outcome or details of a future event are still uncertain.

  • For example, “The location of the party is still TBD.”
  • A person might say, “The schedule for the conference is TBD.”
  • Another might comment, “The winner of the competition will be announced at a TBD date.”

11. ICYMI

This acronym is used to bring attention to something that may have been overlooked or not seen by someone. It is often used when sharing news, updates, or interesting content.

  • For example, “ICYMI, there was a major announcement about the upcoming event.”
  • A user might post, “ICYMI, the new season of the show just premiered last night.”
  • Another might say, “ICYMI, there’s a limited-time sale happening right now.”

12. NVM

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something previously mentioned or asked about is no longer relevant or important. It is often used in casual conversations or when correcting oneself.

  • For instance, “NVM, I found the answer to my question.”
  • A user might comment, “NVM, I changed my mind about going out tonight.”
  • Another might say, “NVM, I figured it out on my own.”

13. LMK

This abbreviation is used to request information or ask someone to inform you about something. It is often used when making plans, asking for opinions, or seeking updates.

  • For example, “LMK if you’re available to meet up later.”
  • A user might post, “LMK what you think of the new album.”
  • Another might say, “LMK when you’re done with your work.”

14. IDK

This abbreviation is used to express uncertainty or lack of knowledge about something. It is often used in response to a question or when someone is unsure about a particular topic.

  • For instance, “IDK the answer to that question.”
  • A user might comment, “IDK what to wear to the party.”
  • Another might say, “IDK why they made that decision.”

15. BTW

This abbreviation is used to introduce additional information or a side note in a conversation. It is often used to bring up something related to the current topic but not directly connected.

  • For example, “BTW, did you hear about the new restaurant opening?”
  • A user might post, “BTW, I’m going on vacation next week.”
  • Another might say, “BTW, I saw your favorite band perform live last night.”

16. FYI

This acronym is used to share information or give a heads-up to someone. It is often used to provide additional context or knowledge.

  • For example, “FYI, the meeting has been rescheduled to tomorrow.”
  • A coworker might send an email saying, “FYI, there’s a new policy that goes into effect next week.”
  • Someone might comment on a social media post, “FYI, this article has been debunked as fake news.”

17. IMHO

This acronym is used to express one’s personal viewpoint or perspective. It is often used to preface a statement that may be subjective or open to interpretation.

  • For instance, “IMHO, the new restaurant in town has the best pizza.”
  • In a discussion about movies, someone might say, “IMHO, the original is always better than the remake.”
  • A person might comment on a controversial topic, “IMHO, everyone should have the right to marry the person they love.”

18. TBH

This acronym is used to preface a statement that is meant to be sincere or candid. It is often used to express an opinion or reveal something that may not be widely known.

  • For example, “TBH, I didn’t really enjoy the concert last night.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “TBH, I think that outfit is a little outdated.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s social media post, “TBH, you look amazing in that photo!”

19. AFAIK

This acronym is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s current knowledge or understanding. It is often used when the speaker wants to clarify that they may not have all the facts.

  • For instance, “AFAIK, the event starts at 7 PM.”
  • In a discussion about a news article, someone might say, “AFAIK, the company has not yet released an official statement.”
  • A person might comment on a rumor, “AFAIK, there is no truth to that gossip.”

20. FWIW

This acronym is used to preface a statement that may not hold much value or significance, but is being shared nonetheless. It is often used to provide additional information or a different perspective.

  • For example, “FWIW, I heard that the store is having a sale next week.”
  • In a conversation about a movie, someone might say, “FWIW, I thought the acting was really good.”
  • A person might comment on a friend’s decision, “FWIW, I think you should go for it and chase your dreams.”

21. YOLO

This phrase is often used to encourage someone to take risks or live life to the fullest, as life is short and should be enjoyed. It can also be used sarcastically to mock someone for making impulsive or reckless decisions.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’m quitting my job and traveling the world. YOLO!”
  • Another might comment, “Just ate a whole pizza by myself. YOLO, right?”
  • On the other hand, someone might jokingly say, “Should I eat this expired yogurt? YOLO!”.

22. FOMO

This refers to the anxiety or unease that someone feels when they believe they are missing out on exciting or interesting experiences. It often stems from seeing others’ social media posts or hearing about events or activities that one was not able to attend.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I didn’t go to the party last night and now I have serious FOMO.”
  • Another might comment, “Seeing all the vacation photos on Instagram is giving me major FOMO.”
  • Someone might express their FOMO by saying, “I wish I could be in two places at once. FOMO is real.”

23. JOMO

This is the opposite of FOMO and refers to the pleasure or contentment one feels when they choose to stay home or opt out of social activities. JOMO is about embracing solitude and finding joy in missing out on things that may not align with personal preferences or values.

  • For example, a person might say, “I decided to have a quiet night in and it was pure JOMO.”
  • Another might comment, “Sometimes I feel guilty for not going out, but then I remember how much I love JOMO.”
  • Someone might express their preference for JOMO by saying, “I’d rather stay home and read a book. JOMO over FOMO any day.”

24. SMH

This is often used to express disapproval, disappointment, or disbelief in response to something someone said or did. It can also be used to convey frustration or annoyance.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I can’t believe they canceled the concert. SMH.”
  • Another might comment, “Just witnessed someone littering right in front of a trash can. SMH.”
  • Someone might use SMH to express annoyance with themselves, saying, “I just locked my keys in the car. SMH, what a day.”

25. LOL

This acronym is used to indicate that something is funny or amusing. It’s often used in text messages, online chats, or social media posts to express laughter or to lighten the tone of a conversation.

  • For example, a person might say, “That joke was hilarious. LOL!”
  • Another might comment, “Just saw a funny video. LOL, couldn’t stop laughing.”
  • Someone might use LOL to acknowledge a joke without actually laughing, saying, “LOL, that’s a good one.”

26. OMG

An expression used to convey surprise, excitement, or disbelief. It is often used in text messages, social media, and online conversations.

  • For example, “OMG, I just won the lottery!”
  • A person might exclaim, “OMG, that concert was amazing!”
  • Another might react with, “OMG, I can’t believe she said that!”

27. BFF

An acronym used to refer to a very close and trusted friend. It is often used to describe a deep and long-lasting friendship.

  • For instance, “She’s my BFF. We’ve been friends since kindergarten.”
  • Two friends might say, “We’re BFFs forever, no matter what.”
  • A person might post a picture with their best friend and caption it, “Me and my BFF, always by my side.”

28. BAE

A term of endearment used to refer to a romantic partner or someone special in one’s life. It is often used to express love or affection.

  • For example, “I can’t wait to see my bae tonight.”
  • A person might say, “She’s my bae, the love of my life.”
  • Another might post a picture with their significant other and write, “Date night with my bae.”

29. YMMV

An expression used to indicate that individual experiences or results may differ. It is often used when giving advice or sharing personal opinions.

  • For instance, “I loved that restaurant, but YMMV.”
  • A person might say, “I found that product to be really effective, but YMMV.”
  • Another might comment, “The movie got mixed reviews, so YMMV.”

30. TL;DR

An abbreviation used to summarize a lengthy piece of text or provide a concise explanation. It is often used to save time or convey a lack of interest in reading the full content.

  • For example, “I don’t have time to read the whole article, can you give me a TL;DR?”
  • A person might write, “TL;DR: The book is a must-read for fantasy lovers.”
  • Another might comment, “TL;DR version: The movie was a disappointment.”

31. IMO

This acronym is used to preface a statement or opinion, indicating that it is the speaker’s personal viewpoint. It is often used in online discussions or debates.

  • For example, “IMO, the new movie is better than the original.”
  • A user might comment, “IMO, pineapple does belong on pizza.”
  • Someone might say, “IMO, the best way to relax is by reading a good book.”

32. ROFL

This acronym is used to indicate that something is extremely funny. It is often used in text messages or online conversations to express laughter.

  • For instance, “That joke was hilarious! I was ROFL.”
  • A person might comment, “ROFL, that video never fails to make me laugh.”
  • Someone might say, “I couldn’t stop ROFL when I saw that meme.”

33. ASAP

This acronym is used to indicate that something needs to be done quickly or urgently. It is often used in professional or formal contexts.

  • For example, “Please send me the report ASAP.”
  • A boss might say, “I need those files ASAP, we have a deadline.”
  • Someone might text their friend, “I forgot my keys at home, can you bring them to me ASAP?”

34. ETA

This acronym is used to indicate the expected time of arrival for a person or thing. It is often used in travel or logistics contexts.

  • For instance, “Our ETA at the airport is 6:00 PM.”
  • A delivery driver might say, “I’ll be there in 15 minutes, ETA is 3:30.”
  • Someone might text their friend, “What’s your ETA? I’m waiting for you at the restaurant.”

35. RSVP

This acronym is used to request a response from the recipient, usually regarding attendance to an event. It is often used in formal invitations.

  • For example, “Please RSVP by Friday if you will be attending the wedding.”
  • A host might say, “RSVP is required for the dinner party.”
  • Someone might text their friend, “Did you RSVP for the conference yet?”

36. TMI

Used when someone shares an excessive or inappropriate amount of personal details or information.

  • For instance, if someone starts talking about their recent bathroom habits, a person might comment, “TMI, dude.”
  • In a conversation about a medical condition, someone might say, “I don’t need to know all the TMI.”
  • A person might share a story and end it with, “And then he proceeded to give me all the TMI about his love life.”

37. NSFW

Indicates that the content being shared is inappropriate or explicit and should not be viewed in a professional or public setting.

  • For example, if someone shares a link to an adult website, they might preface it with “NSFW.”
  • A person might warn their coworker, “Hey, don’t open that email at work. It’s NSFW.”
  • In a discussion about internet browsing, someone might ask, “Do you use a browser extension to block NSFW content?”

38. DIY

Refers to the practice of completing tasks or projects on your own, without hiring professional help.

  • For instance, if someone shares a tutorial on building a bookshelf, they might title it “DIY Bookshelf.”
  • In a conversation about home improvement, someone might say, “I’m planning to DIY my kitchen remodel.”
  • A person might ask for advice, saying, “Any tips for DIY-ing a car repair?”

39. EOD

Used to indicate the end of the workday or a deadline for completing a task.

  • For example, a coworker might send an email with the subject line “EOD Report” to indicate that it needs to be completed by the end of the day.
  • During a meeting, a project manager might say, “We need all the deliverables by EOD tomorrow.”
  • A person might set a reminder on their phone with the label “EOD: Submit expense report.”
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40. EOW

Similar to EOD, but refers to the end of the workweek or a deadline for completing a task by the end of the week.

  • For instance, a manager might ask their team to submit their weekly progress reports by EOW.
  • In a discussion about project timelines, someone might say, “Let’s aim to have this phase completed by EOW.”
  • A person might write a note on their calendar saying, “EOW: Follow up with clients.”

41. EOM

This acronym is used to indicate that the entire message is contained in the subject line, and there is no need to open the email. It saves time and space, especially in professional or formal email communications.

  • For example, a subject line might read, “Meeting at 3pm, EOM.”
  • In a quick email exchange, a sender might write, “Can you send me the report? EOM.”
  • A recipient might reply, “Sure, here it is. EOM.”

42. IIRC

This phrase is used to indicate that the information being shared is based on the speaker’s memory and may not be completely accurate. It is often used in online discussions or when recounting past events.

  • For instance, a user might comment, “IIRC, the movie was released in 1995.”
  • In a debate about historical facts, someone might say, “IIRC, the battle took place in 1776.”
  • Another might add, “IIRC, the author won a Nobel Prize for that book.”

43. N/A

This abbreviation is used to indicate that something does not apply to a particular situation or is irrelevant. It is commonly used in forms, surveys, or when answering questions.

  • For example, a person might leave a field blank on a form and write “N/A” to indicate that it does not pertain to them.
  • In a survey question about marital status, someone might select “N/A” if they are not married.
  • A person might respond to a question about their favorite color with “N/A” if they do not have one.
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44. CYL

This acronym is used to say goodbye or indicate that the speaker will see the other person at a later time. It is a casual and friendly way to end a conversation or chat.

  • For instance, a person might say, “I have to go now. CYL!”
  • In a text message exchange, someone might write, “Thanks for the help. CYL tomorrow.”
  • A person might end a phone call with, “I’ll talk to you later. CYL!”

45. G2G

This shorthand phrase is used to indicate that the speaker needs to leave or end the conversation. It is often used in text messages or online chats.

  • For example, a person might write, “Sorry, I have to go. G2G!”
  • In a chat room, someone might say, “It was nice talking to you all. G2G now.”
  • A person might text their friend, “I’ll catch up with you later. G2G for now.”

46. L8

This is an abbreviation of the word “late” and is used as slang to mean “later” or “see you later”. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I have to go now, talk to you l8r!”
  • In a group chat, someone might write, “I’ll catch up with you all l8r!”
  • A person might send a text saying, “Can’t make it tonight, see you l8r!”

47. L8R G8R

This is a playful and rhyming phrase that is used to say “goodbye” or “see you later”. It is often used in a casual or lighthearted manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I have to run, l8r g8r!”
  • When leaving a gathering, someone might say, “Thanks for having me, l8r g8r!”
  • A person might write in a text, “I’m off to bed, l8r g8r!”

48. C U L8R

This is an abbreviation of the phrase “see you later” and is used as slang to say goodbye or indicate that you will see someone at a later time.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I have to go now, c u l8r!”
  • When leaving work, someone might say, “Have a great evening, c u l8r!”
  • A person might send a text saying, “I’ll be busy for the next few hours, c u l8r!”

49. L8RZ

This is a casual and abbreviated form of the word “later”. It is often used as slang to say “goodbye” or “see you later” in a playful or informal manner.

  • For instance, a friend might say, “I have to go now, l8rz!”
  • When leaving a social event, someone might say, “Thanks for a great time, l8rz!”
  • A person might send a text saying, “Gotta run some errands, l8rz!”

50. L8TR

This is an abbreviation of the word “later” and is used as slang to mean “see you later” or “goodbye”. It is commonly used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, a friend might say, “I have to go now, talk to you l8tr!”
  • When leaving a gathering, someone might say, “Take care, l8tr!”
  • A person might send a text saying, “I’ll catch up with you l8tr!”

51. L8R H8R

This slang phrase is used to dismiss or mock someone who is being negative or critical. It implies that their opinions or comments are not worth considering and can be disregarded.

  • For example, if someone leaves a rude comment on a social media post, a person might respond with “L8R H8R!”
  • In a conversation about dealing with negativity, someone might say, “Just ignore the haters and say ‘L8R H8R’.”
  • A person might use this phrase playfully with a friend who is teasing them, saying “L8R H8R, you can’t bring me down!”

52. T2UL

This shorthand phrase is commonly used to indicate that the person will talk to the other person at a later time. It is often used in text messages or instant messaging.

  • For instance, if someone has to end a conversation abruptly, they might say “Gotta go, T2UL!”
  • A person might send a quick message to a friend, saying “I’ll be busy for the next few hours, T2UL.”
  • In a group chat, someone might say “I need to focus on work, T2UL everyone!”

53. L8R SK8R

This phrase is a playful and informal way of saying goodbye to someone. It is often used in a lighthearted or casual context.

  • For example, if someone is leaving a gathering with friends, they might say “See you later, L8R SK8R!”
  • In a text message, someone might say “I’m heading out, L8R SK8R!”
  • A person might use this phrase jokingly with a friend who is leaving, saying “Don’t forget to wear your helmet, L8R SK8R!”

54. L8R PPL

This phrase is a shortened version of “later, people” and is used to bid farewell to a group of people. It is often used in a casual or friendly context.

  • For instance, if someone is leaving a party, they might say “Thanks for having me, L8R PPL!”
  • In a group chat, someone might say “I’m signing off for the night, L8R PPL!”
  • A person might use this phrase when saying goodbye to coworkers at the end of the workday, saying “Have a great evening, L8R PPL!”

55. L8R G8RZ

This phrase is a playful and rhyming way of saying goodbye to someone. It is often used in a lighthearted or casual context.

  • For example, if someone is leaving a social gathering, they might say “Take care, L8R G8RZ!”
  • In a text message, someone might say “I’m off to bed, L8R G8RZ!”
  • A person might use this phrase jokingly with a friend who is leaving, saying “Don’t forget to watch out for those gators, L8R G8RZ!”

56. L8R DUDE

A casual way of saying “later” or “see you later” to someone. It is often used among friends or acquaintances to indicate that they will meet or talk again in the future.

  • For example, “I’m heading out now. L8R DUDE!”
  • A person might send a text message saying, “Had a great time hanging out. L8R DUDE!”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’ll catch you later. L8R DUDE!”

57. L8R ALLIG8R

A playful and rhyming way of saying “later” or “goodbye” to someone. It is often used in a lighthearted or humorous manner.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I have to go now. L8R ALLIG8R!”
  • A person might leave a note saying, “Thanks for the fun time. L8R ALLIG8R!”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “Alright, I’ll see you later. L8R ALLIG8R!”

58. L8RZ G8RZ

A playful and abbreviated way of saying “later” or “goodbye” to a group of people. It is often used in a casual or friendly setting.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’m heading out. L8RZ G8RZ!”
  • A person might send a group message saying, “Had a great time with you all. L8RZ G8RZ!”
  • In a social gathering, someone might say, “Alright, everyone. I’ll catch you later. L8RZ G8RZ!”

59. TBA

An abbreviation used to indicate that a specific time, date, or information is not yet determined or available. It is often used in event announcements or schedules.

  • For instance, a poster might say, “Stay tuned for more details. Time and location TBA.”
  • A person might receive an invitation saying, “Save the date. More information TBA.”
  • In a conversation about upcoming plans, someone might say, “We haven’t decided on the time yet. It’s TBA.”

60. HMU

A phrase used to encourage someone to contact or reach out to the speaker. It is often used to express a desire for further communication or interaction.

  • For example, a person might say, “I’ll be free this weekend. HMU if you want to hang out!”
  • Someone might post on social media, “Looking for recommendations for a good restaurant. HMU with your suggestions!”
  • In a text message, someone might say, “I heard you’re good with computers. HMU if you can help me fix mine!”

61. WYD

This is a shorthand way of asking someone what they are currently doing or what their plans are. It is often used in text messages or online conversations.

  • For example, a friend might text, “Hey, wyd tonight?”
  • In a group chat, someone might ask, “Wyd this weekend?”
  • A person might respond to the question with, “Just watching Netflix, wyd?”

62. OP

This refers to the person who started a discussion or made the initial post. The term identifies the original post among the follow-up comments.

  • For instance, if someone shares a story on Reddit, they are the OP of that thread.
  • In a lengthy discussion thread, a user might ask, “Can the OP provide more details?”
  • Someone might support the initial post with a comment like, “I agree with the OP on this matter.”

63. TIL

Users share fascinating facts or information they just learned. It’s a way to share newfound knowledge with the community.

  • For instance, “TIL that honey never spoils.”
  • A user might post, “TIL that the shortest war in history lasted just 38 minutes.”
  • Another might say, “TIL that the word ‘set’ has the highest number of different meanings in the English language.”
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64. AMA

A platform for users to answer questions about a specific topic or experience. It’s a chance for Redditors to interact with experts or interesting individuals.

  • For example, “I’m an astronaut. AMA!”
  • A celebrity might post, “I just released my new movie. AMA about the behind-the-scenes!”
  • An expert in a niche field might say, “I research deep-sea creatures. AMA about the mysteries of the ocean depths!”

65. Revolver

This is a type of repeating handgun that has a revolving cylinder containing multiple chambers and at least one barrel for firing. The term “six-shooter” often refers to a revolver with a six-round capacity, though not all revolvers hold six rounds.

  • For instance, in old western films, you might hear, “He pulled out his trusty six-shooter and took aim.”
  • In a discussion about classic firearms, one might say, “The revolver changed the landscape of personal defense.”
  • A gun enthusiast might note, “While semi-automatic pistols are more prevalent today, there’s still something iconic about the revolver.”

66. Firearm

A general term for a portable weapon that expels one or more projectiles, either through an explosion or other form of combustion. “Piece” is a colloquial term often used to refer to a firearm, especially in urban settings.

  • For example, in crime movies, a character might say, “Make sure you’re packing a piece before the deal.”
  • A person discussing gun rights might argue, “Every citizen has the right to own a firearm for self-defense.”
  • Another might caution, “Handling a firearm requires proper training and respect for the weapon’s power.”