Top 36 Slang For Long – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to slangs, the English language is constantly evolving, and keeping up with the latest trends can be a challenge. But fear not, because we’ve got you covered! Our team has scoured the depths of the internet to bring you a curated list of the top slang for long. From the latest phrases to the coolest expressions, this listicle will have you speaking like a pro in no time. So sit back, relax, and get ready to impress your friends with your newfound slang knowledge!

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1. Forever

This term is used to describe a duration that seems endless or never-ending. It suggests that something will last for an extremely long period.

  • For example, “I’ve been waiting for this movie to come out forever!”
  • A person might say, “It took forever for the bus to arrive.”
  • Someone might exclaim, “This line is moving so slowly, it’s taking forever!”

2. Ages

This word refers to a long period of time. It implies that something took a considerable amount of time to happen or that a person has been waiting for a while.

  • For instance, “I haven’t seen you in ages!”
  • A person might say, “It took ages for my food to arrive at the restaurant.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve been trying to solve this puzzle for ages.”

3. Eons

This term is used to describe an incredibly long duration, often implying a time frame that is difficult to comprehend.

  • For example, “It feels like it’s been eons since we last visited this place.”
  • A person might say, “The Earth has been around for eons.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve been waiting in this line for eons!”

4. Endless

This word suggests that something goes on and on without stopping or coming to a conclusion. It conveys the idea of a continuous and uninterrupted duration.

  • For instance, “We walked through the endless corridors of the museum.”
  • A person might say, “The meeting seemed endless.”
  • Someone might comment, “I’ve been scrolling through social media for what feels like an endless amount of time.”

5. Lengthy

This term describes something that is longer than usual or expected. It implies that a particular activity, event, or situation took a significant amount of time.

  • For example, “The movie was enjoyable, but it was a bit lengthy.”
  • A person might say, “I had a lengthy conversation with my boss about the project.”
  • Someone might comment, “The book has a lengthy introduction before it gets to the main story.”

6. Prolonged

This term refers to something that lasts for an extended period of time, often longer than expected or desired. It can also imply that the duration of the event or situation is tedious or boring.

  • For example, “The meeting was prolonged due to multiple interruptions.”
  • A person might complain, “The movie was so prolonged, I almost fell asleep.”
  • In a conversation about a never-ending project, someone might say, “This task feels never-ending and prolonged.”

7. Extensive

This word is used to describe something that is comprehensive, thorough, or covers a wide range. It can imply that a process or task requires a significant amount of time and effort to complete.

  • For instance, “She conducted an extensive research study on the topic.”
  • A person might say, “The report provided an extensive analysis of the issue.”
  • In a discussion about a long book, someone might comment, “The novel is quite extensive, but worth the read.”

8. Marathon

In slang, “marathon” refers to something that requires a great deal of stamina or endurance due to its length or intensity. It can be used to describe any activity or event that feels like a prolonged and challenging endeavor.

  • For example, “That game was a marathon, lasting over four hours.”
  • A person might say, “I’m training for a marathon, and the long runs are grueling.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult project, someone might comment, “This task feels like a marathon, but we’ll get through it.”

9. Drawn-out

This term describes something that is unnecessarily or excessively prolonged, often causing frustration or annoyance. It implies that the duration of the event or situation is longer than necessary or desired.

  • For instance, “The negotiation process was drawn-out, taking months to reach an agreement.”
  • A person might complain, “The movie had a drawn-out ending that could have been shortened.”
  • In a discussion about a lengthy meeting, someone might say, “The presentation was unnecessarily drawn-out, causing disinterest among the attendees.”

10. Tedious

This word is used to describe something that is dull, monotonous, or tiresome, often due to its length or repetitiveness. It implies that the activity or task is uninteresting and feels like a burden to endure.

  • For example, “The data entry job was tedious, requiring hours of repetitive work.”
  • A person might say, “The lecture was so tedious, I struggled to stay awake.”
  • In a conversation about a long and repetitive process, someone might comment, “The paperwork for this application is tedious and time-consuming.”

11. Protracted

This term refers to something that is unnecessarily prolonged or extended, often causing frustration or annoyance. It can be used to describe a situation, process, or conversation that takes longer than expected or desired.

  • For example, “The meeting was protracted, lasting for hours without reaching a resolution.”
  • A person might complain, “The protracted negotiations are delaying the project.”
  • Another might say, “Let’s avoid protracted discussions and focus on finding a solution quickly.”

12. Overlong

This term describes something that is longer than necessary or desired. It can be used to refer to a piece of writing, a speech, a movie, or any other form of communication or activity.

  • For instance, “The overlong movie felt like it would never end.”
  • A person might comment, “The overlong article could have been more concise and to the point.”
  • Another might say, “Let’s trim down the overlong presentation to keep the audience engaged.”

13. Lingering

This term describes something that remains or continues for a longer time than expected or desired. It can be used to describe a feeling, an odor, a memory, or any other form of presence or influence.

  • For example, “The lingering smell of coffee filled the room.”
  • A person might say, “The lingering effects of the illness made her weak.”
  • Another might comment, “The lingering doubt in his mind prevented him from making a decision.”

14. Elongated

This term refers to something that has been made longer or extended in length. It can be used to describe a physical object, a body part, or an abstract concept.

  • For instance, “The elongated bridge spanned across the river.”
  • A person might say, “Her elongated legs gave her an elegant appearance.”
  • Another might comment, “The elongated discussion veered off topic and lost its focus.”

15. Time-consuming

This term describes something that requires a significant amount of time to complete or accomplish. It can be used to refer to a task, a process, or an activity that is perceived as taking longer than desired.

  • For example, “The time-consuming project required weeks of dedicated work.”
  • A person might say, “The time-consuming commute was draining his energy.”
  • Another might comment, “Let’s find a more efficient solution to avoid the time-consuming manual process.”

16. Interminable

This word is used to describe something that seems to have no end, often in a negative or frustrating way. It implies a long duration or a feeling of being dragged out.

  • For example, “The meeting felt interminable, lasting for hours with no progress.”
  • A person might complain, “The line at the DMV is always interminable.”
  • Someone might say, “The wait for the bus felt interminable in the pouring rain.”

17. Never-ending

This term is used to describe something that continues without stopping or seems to have no end. It can convey a sense of exhaustion or frustration due to the length of time or lack of conclusion.

  • For instance, “The project felt never-ending, with constant changes and delays.”
  • A person might say, “My to-do list is never-ending; there’s always something more to do.”
  • Someone might complain, “The construction on this road is never-ending; it’s been months!”

18. Sustained

This word is used to describe something that continues for a long time without interruption. It suggests a continuous or prolonged duration.

  • For example, “The team’s sustained effort led to their victory.”
  • A person might say, “The company experienced sustained growth over the past decade.”
  • Someone might comment, “The sustained applause showed the audience’s appreciation for the performance.”

19. Long-winded

This term is used to describe someone who speaks or writes at great length, often using unnecessary or excessive words. It suggests a lack of conciseness or brevity.

  • For instance, “The professor’s lectures were often long-winded and hard to follow.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer reading articles that are concise and to the point, rather than long-winded.”
  • Someone might complain, “His emails are always long-winded; he never gets to the main point.”

20. Long-lasting

This word is used to describe something that continues or remains effective for a long time. It implies a lasting quality or endurance.

  • For example, “The long-lasting battery of this phone is a major selling point.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer investing in long-lasting products that won’t need frequent replacement.”
  • Someone might comment, “The long-lasting effects of climate change are a major concern for future generations.”

21. Wordy

This term refers to something that is excessively long or uses too many words. It can also describe someone who tends to speak or write in a long-winded manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Your essay is too wordy. Try to be more concise.”
  • If someone is rambling on during a conversation, you might say, “Wow, they’re really being wordy.”
  • A review of a book might mention, “The author’s writing style is unnecessarily wordy, making it difficult to stay engaged.”

22. Prolix

Similar to “wordy,” this term describes something that is excessively long or uses too many words. It can also refer to someone who tends to speak or write in a long-winded manner.

  • For instance, a professor might comment, “The student’s response was unnecessarily prolix.”
  • If someone is going on and on about a topic, you might say, “They can be quite prolix.”
  • A book review might state, “The author’s prolix writing style made it challenging to follow the plot.”

23. Lasting

This term describes something that continues for a long period of time without significant changes or interruption. It can refer to physical objects, relationships, or even emotions.

  • For example, “Their friendship has been lasting for over a decade.”
  • If someone is searching for a long-lasting product, they might ask, “Do you have any recommendations for lasting shoes?”
  • A person describing their love for a particular song might say, “The lasting impact of this song is incredible.”

24. Enduring

This term refers to something that is able to withstand hardships or challenges and remains in existence for a long time. It can describe physical objects, ideas, or even people.

  • For instance, “The enduring beauty of the ancient ruins is awe-inspiring.”
  • If someone is going through a difficult time but remains strong, you might say, “They are incredibly enduring.”
  • A book review might mention, “The enduring themes of love and sacrifice make this novel a timeless classic.”

25. Extended

This term describes something that is longer in duration than usual or expected. It can refer to time, events, or even physical objects.

  • For example, “They took an extended vacation to explore Europe.”
  • If a meeting runs longer than anticipated, someone might say, “This extended discussion is taking up too much time.”
  • A person describing a movie might say, “The extended version of the film includes additional scenes not shown in theaters.”

26. Lengthwise

This term refers to something that is oriented or positioned in the direction of its length.

  • For example, “Cut the cucumber lengthwise to make long slices.”
  • A person might say, “I prefer to park my car lengthwise along the curb.”
  • In a cooking recipe, it might instruct, “Slice the chicken breast lengthwise into thin strips.”

27. Lengthened

This word describes the action of making something longer in length.

  • For instance, “She lengthened her skirt by adding a strip of fabric at the bottom.”
  • In a discussion about a book adaptation, someone might comment, “The movie lengthened the ending compared to the original story.”
  • A person might say, “I lengthened my workout routine to include more exercises.”

28. Dragged-out

This slang term is used to describe something that is unnecessarily prolonged or extended in duration.

  • For example, “The meeting was so dragged-out, it could have been finished in half the time.”
  • In a conversation about a TV show, someone might say, “The plotline felt dragged-out and could have been resolved sooner.”
  • A person might comment, “I find long, dragged-out movies to be tedious.”

29. Stretched out

This phrase refers to something that has been extended or elongated in length.

  • For instance, “He stretched out his legs after sitting for hours.”
  • In a discussion about yoga, someone might say, “I like to start my practice with a few stretches to get my body stretched out.”
  • A person might comment, “The road stretched out for miles ahead of us.”

30. Extended-play

This term is often used in the context of music to refer to an extended version of a single or an album with extra tracks.

  • For example, “The band released an extended-play version of their hit song.”
  • In a conversation about vinyl records, someone might say, “I love collecting extended-play records from the 80s.”
  • A person might comment, “The extended-play edition of the album includes bonus tracks and remixes.”

31. Long-haul

This term is often used to describe a journey or trip that covers a long distance or takes a significant amount of time. It can refer to both physical travel and metaphorical journeys.

  • For example, “I’m not looking forward to the long-haul flight to Australia.”
  • A truck driver might say, “I specialize in long-haul routes.”
  • In a discussion about relationships, someone might comment, “Marriage is a long-haul commitment.”

32. Long-term

This term is used to describe something that lasts or is intended to last for a significant period of time. It can refer to various aspects of life, such as relationships, investments, or plans.

  • For instance, “I’m looking for a long-term job, not just a temporary gig.”
  • A financial advisor might recommend, “Investing in stocks is best for long-term growth.”
  • In a conversation about goals, someone might say, “I have a long-term plan to start my own business.”

33. Long-drawn-out

This term is used to describe something that takes a longer time than expected or is unnecessarily prolonged. It often implies a sense of frustration or impatience with the duration of the situation.

  • For example, “The meeting was long-drawn-out and could have been more efficient.”
  • A person might complain, “The process of getting a driver’s license is long-drawn-out.”
  • In a discussion about legal proceedings, someone might comment, “The trial is expected to be long-drawn-out due to the complexity of the case.”

34. Long-standing

This term is used to describe something that has been in existence or has continued for a significant period of time. It often implies stability, reliability, or tradition.

  • For instance, “They have a long-standing tradition of celebrating Thanksgiving together.”
  • A person might say, “We have been friends for a long-standing 20 years.”
  • In a conversation about institutions, someone might comment, “The university has a long-standing reputation for excellence.”

35. Long-run

This term is used to describe a period of time that is longer than the immediate or short-term. It can refer to various aspects of life, such as goals, plans, or trends.

  • For example, “In the long-run, I want to travel the world.”
  • A business owner might say, “We need to consider the long-run impact of our decisions.”
  • In a discussion about economic trends, someone might comment, “In the long-run, technology will continue to drive innovation.”

36. Long-shot

This term is used to describe something that has a very slim chance of happening or being successful. It can refer to a situation, an idea, or a person.

  • For example, “Winning the lottery is a long-shot, but someone has to win eventually.”
  • In a sports context, a commentator might say, “It’s a long-shot for the underdog team to come back and win the game.”
  • A person might use this term to describe a risky investment, saying, “Putting all your money into that startup is a long-shot, but it could pay off big if it succeeds.”
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