Top 32 Slang For Outhouse – Meaning & Usage

Outhouses, though less common in modern times, hold a unique place in history and culture. From rural settings to camping trips, these structures have been given various names and slang terms throughout the years. Curious to know what people have called them? Our team has compiled a list of the top slang words for outhouse, so you can impress your friends with your knowledge of this quirky and often humorous vocabulary. Get ready to explore the world of outhouse slang and add some colorful expressions to your repertoire!

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1. Privy

A privy is another term for a toilet or outhouse. It is often used in a more formal or old-fashioned context.

  • For example, “Excuse me, where is the privy?”
  • A historical reenactor might say, “I need to use the privy before we continue.”
  • In a period drama, a character might comment, “The privy is located at the end of the garden.”

2. John

“John” is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse, commonly used in American English.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back in a minute, I need to use the John.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the closest John around here?”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might say, “I spent half my day on the John today.”

3. Thunderbox

A thunderbox is a slang term for an outhouse or outdoor toilet. The term emphasizes the noise made when using such a facility.

  • For example, “I can’t believe we still have a thunderbox in the backyard.”
  • A person might joke, “I hope you brought earplugs if you’re using the thunderbox.”
  • In a discussion about historical living conditions, someone might mention, “Back in the day, everyone had to use a thunderbox.”

4. Crapper

A crapper is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse. It is derived from the name of Thomas Crapper, a plumber who is often mistakenly credited with inventing the modern flush toilet.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the crapper.”
  • A person might ask, “Is there a crapper nearby?”
  • In a lighthearted conversation, someone might say, “I can’t believe we’re discussing the history of the crapper.”

5. Loo

The term “loo” is a slang term for a toilet or bathroom, commonly used in British English.

  • For example, “Excuse me, where’s the loo?”
  • A person might comment, “I really need to find a loo.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might say, “I’ll meet you in the loo in five minutes.”

6. Dunny

Dunny is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse. It is commonly used in Australia and New Zealand.

  • For example, “I need to use the dunny, where is it?”
  • In a humorous context, someone might say, “I’ll be in the dunny if you need me.”
  • A person might complain, “The dunny is always occupied when I need to use it.”

7. Bog

Bog is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse. It is commonly used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

  • For instance, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the bog.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Where’s the bog around here?”
  • A person might say, “I hate cleaning the bog, it’s the worst chore.”

8. Outhouse

An outhouse is a small building or structure located outside of a main dwelling, used for the purpose of containing a toilet or latrine. It is often a simple, primitive structure without plumbing or running water.

  • For example, “The cabin in the woods has an outhouse for bathroom facilities.”
  • In a camping trip, someone might say, “I need to find the nearest outhouse, nature is calling.”
  • A person might comment, “Using an outhouse in the winter is not a pleasant experience.”

9. Latrine

A latrine is a communal or public toilet, often used in military or outdoor settings. It is a simple, basic structure for waste disposal.

  • For instance, “The soldiers had to use a latrine in the field.”
  • In a military context, someone might say, “Make sure to dig a latrine pit at least six feet deep.”
  • A person might comment, “The latrine facilities at the campsite were clean and well-maintained.”

10. Shitter

Shitter is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse. It is a vulgar term and not suitable for formal or polite conversation.

  • For example, “I need to find the nearest shitter, I can’t hold it any longer.”
  • In a joking manner, someone might say, “I’ll be in the shitter if you need me.”
  • A person might complain, “The shitter is always occupied when I need to use it.”

11. Can

This is a slang term for an outhouse or outdoor toilet. It is often used in informal or humorous contexts.

  • For example, “I gotta use the can, be right back!”
  • In a camping trip, someone might say, “Where’s the nearest can?”
  • A person might complain, “I hate having to use the can at night, it’s so creepy.”

12. Throne

This term refers to an outhouse or outdoor toilet. It is often used humorously to elevate the status of using such facilities.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I must visit the throne.”
  • Someone might ask, “Is the throne occupied?”
  • In a conversation about rustic living, a person might say, “I had to get used to using the throne when I moved to the countryside.”

13. Potty

This is a colloquial term for an outhouse or outdoor toilet. It is often used when referring to a child’s training toilet or in a playful manner.

  • For example, “I need to find a potty, I can’t hold it anymore!”
  • A parent might ask their child, “Do you need to use the potty before we leave?”
  • In a comedic sketch, someone might say, “I can’t believe we’re having a serious discussion about potties.”

This term is derived from naval slang and refers to an outhouse or outdoor toilet. It is commonly used in maritime or military contexts.

  • For instance, “I’ll be back, I need to use the head.”
  • A sailor might ask, “Where’s the head on this ship?”
  • In a Navy-themed movie, a character might say, “I’ll be in the head if anyone needs me.”

15. Lavatory

This is a formal term for an outhouse or outdoor toilet. It is often used in more polite or sophisticated contexts.

  • For example, “Excuse me, I need to find the lavatory.”
  • In a fancy restaurant, a person might ask, “Where is the lavatory located?”
  • A character in a period drama might say, “I’ll be in the lavatory, freshening up.”

16. Loo-loo

This is a playful term for an outhouse or toilet. “Loo-loo” is a colloquial term often used in informal or humorous contexts.

  • For example, in a children’s book, a character might say, “I need to use the loo-loo!”
  • Someone discussing camping might mention, “We had to use the loo-loo in the middle of the night.”
  • A person joking about bathroom breaks might say, “Excuse me, I need to visit the loo-loo.”

17. Biffy

This is a slang term for an outhouse or bathroom. “Biffy” is a casual term often used in informal or rural settings.

  • For instance, someone might ask, “Where’s the biffy around here?”
  • In a conversation about outdoor events, a person might say, “Make sure you know where the biffy is located.”
  • A camper might mention, “We had to walk to the biffy in the middle of the night.”

18. Privy pit

This term refers to an outhouse or pit toilet. “Privy pit” is often used to describe a basic, outdoor toilet facility.

  • For example, in a historical setting, a sign might point to the “privy pit” for visitors.
  • Someone discussing camping might say, “We had to dig a privy pit for our outdoor toilet.”
  • A person describing a remote cabin might mention, “They have a basic privy pit for bathroom needs.”

19. Outhouse shack

This term describes a small building or shack that houses an outhouse. “Outhouse shack” is often used to refer to a simple, outdoor bathroom structure.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I need to use the outhouse shack.”
  • In a conversation about rural living, a person might mention, “They have a little outhouse shack on their property.”
  • A camper might say, “I prefer using the outhouse shack rather than the campground bathroom.”

20. Potty shack

This term refers to a small, portable structure that serves as a toilet. “Potty shack” is often used in informal or humorous contexts.

  • For example, in a discussion about outdoor events, someone might say, “They set up potty shacks for the attendees.”
  • A parent might mention, “We had to use the potty shack at the park.”
  • Someone joking about bathroom breaks might say, “Excuse me, I need to find the nearest potty shack.”

21. Johnnie house

This term refers to an outdoor toilet or outhouse. It is often used in a casual or humorous way.

  • For example, “I need to use the Johnnie house, be right back.”
  • In a camping trip, someone might say, “Make sure to bring some toilet paper for the Johnnie house.”
  • A person discussing rustic living might mention, “Back in the day, every house had a Johnnie house in the backyard.”

22. Throne room

This term is a playful way to refer to a bathroom or outhouse. It implies that the person using it is royalty or in a position of power.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to visit the throne room.”
  • In a funny conversation about bathroom breaks, someone might say, “I’ll be in the throne room if anyone needs me.”
  • A person discussing home decor might joke, “I want to design my bathroom like a luxurious throne room.”

23. Pisser

This term is a slang for a bathroom or outhouse. It is usually used in a casual or humorous context.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the pisser.”
  • In a conversation about finding a restroom, someone might ask, “Do you know where the pisser is around here?”
  • A person discussing the need for a break might say, “I can’t hold it anymore, I need to find a pisser.”

24. Little boys’ room

This term refers to a bathroom or outhouse, often in a playful or nostalgic way. It is typically used by men or when referring to male facilities.

  • For instance, “Excuse me, I need to use the little boys’ room.”
  • In a conversation about finding a restroom, someone might ask, “Do you know where the little boys’ room is?”
  • A person discussing childhood memories might mention, “I remember my dad always taking me to the little boys’ room when we were out.”

25. Chamber pot

A chamber pot is a small portable toilet or receptacle used for urination and defecation, especially in the past when indoor plumbing was not common.

  • For example, “In medieval times, people used chamber pots instead of modern toilets.”
  • In a historical discussion about hygiene, someone might mention, “Chamber pots were used as a convenient solution before indoor plumbing.”
  • A person discussing camping equipment might say, “A portable chamber pot is essential for outdoor trips without restroom facilities.”

26. Little house on the prairie

This term refers to an outdoor structure used as a toilet, typically located away from the main house. It is called a “little house on the prairie” as a playful and euphemistic way to describe an outhouse.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to use the little house on the prairie.”
  • In a humorous conversation, a person could ask, “Where’s the little house on the prairie around here?”
  • When camping, someone might point out, “We have a little house on the prairie over there for bathroom breaks.”

27. Privy-council

The term “privy-council” is a slang term used to describe an outhouse or outdoor bathroom. It is a playful way to refer to the structure and its purpose.

  • For instance, someone might say, “I’ll be back, I’m heading to the privy-council.”
  • In a camping trip, a person might ask, “Where’s the privy-council located?”
  • When discussing outdoor facilities, someone might mention, “We have a privy-council set up for convenience.”

28. Shanty

The term “shanty” is used to describe a small, crude, and often temporary structure, such as an outhouse. It implies that the structure is simple and basic in design.

  • For example, someone might say, “I need to use the shanty.”
  • In a conversation about camping, a person could ask, “Is there a shanty nearby?”
  • When discussing outdoor facilities, someone might mention, “We have a shanty for bathroom needs.”

29. Little boy’s room

The term “little boy’s room” is a playful and euphemistic way to refer to an outhouse. It is a lighthearted term that adds a touch of humor to the discussion of using an outdoor toilet.

  • For instance, someone might say, “Excuse me, I need to visit the little boy’s room.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person could ask, “Where’s the little boy’s room around here?”
  • When camping, someone might mention, “We have a little boy’s room set up for bathroom breaks.”

30. Little girl’s room

The term “little girl’s room” is a playful and euphemistic way to refer to an outhouse or outdoor bathroom. It adds a touch of humor and whimsy to the discussion of using an outdoor toilet.

  • For example, someone might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to find the little girl’s room.”
  • In a casual conversation, a person could ask, “Do you know where the little girl’s room is?”
  • When discussing outdoor facilities, someone might mention, “We have a little girl’s room set up for convenience.”

31. Jakes

Jakes is a slang term for a toilet or outhouse. It is often used in informal or colloquial settings.

  • For example, “I’ll be right back, I need to use the jakes.”
  • A person might ask, “Where’s the nearest jakes around here?”
  • In a humorous conversation, someone might say, “I hope they have clean jakes at the campsite.”

32. Pit stop

Pit stop is a slang term for a bathroom or restroom. It is often used when referring to taking a quick break to use the facilities.

  • For instance, “I need to make a pit stop before we continue our road trip.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll be right back, I need to take a pit stop.”
  • In a casual conversation, someone might ask, “Do you know where I can find a pit stop around here?”
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