Top 51 Slang For Newsperson – Meaning & Usage

Being a newsperson requires more than just reporting the news; it involves being in touch with the latest slang and trends. Whether you’re a budding journalist or simply curious about the language used in the news industry, we’ve got you covered. In this listicle, we’ve gathered the top slang for newsperson that will help you navigate the world of journalism with ease. Stay ahead of the game and impress your colleagues with your newfound lingo!

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1. Journo

This term is a shortened form of “journalist” and is often used to refer to a reporter or someone who works in the field of journalism.

  • For example, “The journo wrote an in-depth article about the political scandal.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “The journos are working hard to meet the deadline.”
  • A news editor might assign a story to a journo, saying, “I need you to cover the press conference tomorrow.”

2. Newsie

This term is a slang term for a news reporter, especially one who works in the field and covers breaking news stories.

  • For instance, “The newsie was on the scene within minutes of the accident.”
  • A news anchor might introduce a newsie, saying, “We have our on-the-ground newsie reporting live from the protest.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “The newsies are always chasing the latest scoop.”

3. Reporter

This term refers to a person who gathers and reports news for a newspaper, magazine, television, or radio.

  • For example, “The reporter interviewed the mayor about the new city ordinance.”
  • A news producer might assign a story to a reporter, saying, “I need you to cover the local election.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “The reporters are working on their articles for tomorrow’s edition.”

4. Newshound

This term refers to someone who is constantly seeking out and consuming news. It can also be used to describe a journalist who is dedicated and relentless in their pursuit of news stories.

  • For instance, “He’s a real newshound, always staying up-to-date with the latest headlines.”
  • A news editor might say, “We need some newshounds on this breaking story.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might compliment a newshound, saying, “You’re always one step ahead with your news instincts.”

5. Newsman

This term is a gender-specific slang term for a male news reporter. It is often used to refer to a man who works in the field of journalism.

  • For example, “The newsman delivered a powerful report on the humanitarian crisis.”
  • A news anchor might introduce a newsman, saying, “We have our experienced newsman reporting live from the scene.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “The newsman has a knack for finding compelling human interest stories.”

6. Newsgal

This term is slang for a female news reporter or journalist. It is often used in a casual or informal context.

  • For example, “I saw that newsgal reporting live from the scene of the accident.”
  • In a conversation about journalism, someone might say, “I admire the work of newsgals who bring us the latest news.”
  • Another might comment, “That newsgal always asks tough questions during press conferences.”

7. Newsjockey

This term refers to a news anchor or host who guides the news program or show. It implies that the person is in control of the news and has the ability to steer the conversation.

  • For instance, “The newsjockey smoothly transitions between different stories.”
  • In a discussion about news programs, someone might say, “I prefer newsjockeys who are unbiased and present the facts.”
  • Another might comment, “That newsjockey has a great on-screen presence.”

8. Newsbreaker

A newsbreaker is a journalist who is known for breaking important news stories before other news outlets. They are often seen as being at the forefront of news reporting.

  • For example, “The newsbreaker was the first to report on the scandal.”
  • In a conversation about investigative journalism, someone might say, “We need more newsbreakers who are willing to dig deep and uncover the truth.”
  • Another might comment, “That newsbreaker has a knack for finding exclusive stories.”

9. Newsbabe

This term is slang for an attractive female news reporter or anchor. It is often used in a casual or somewhat derogatory manner.

  • For instance, “Some people only watch the news for the newsbabes.”
  • In a discussion about media representation, someone might say, “We should focus on the skills and expertise of news professionals, not their appearance.”
  • Another might comment, “It’s unfortunate that newsbabes are sometimes judged more on their looks than their reporting abilities.”

10. Newsmonkey

A newsmonkey is a journalist who is constantly on the lookout for news stories and is always chasing after the next big scoop. It implies a sense of relentless pursuit and dedication to news reporting.

  • For example, “The newsmonkey was the first to arrive at the scene of the crime.”
  • In a conversation about journalism ethics, someone might say, “Newsmonkeys should prioritize accuracy and integrity in their reporting.”
  • Another might comment, “That newsmonkey has an impressive track record of breaking news stories.”

11. Newswriter

A newswriter refers to a journalist or reporter who writes news articles for newspapers, magazines, or online publications.

  • For example, “The newswriter covered the latest political scandal in her article.”
  • In a newsroom, a newswriter might be assigned to cover breaking news or write feature stories.
  • A newswriter might say, “I have to meet my deadline and submit my article before the end of the day.”

12. Newscrier

A newscrier is someone who announces or proclaims news, often in a loud or attention-grabbing manner. The term is sometimes used to refer to a news anchor or broadcaster.

  • For instance, “The newscrier delivered the breaking news with a sense of urgency.”
  • During a live broadcast, a newscrier might say, “We have just received an update on the situation.”
  • A newscrier might use their voice to captivate the audience and keep them engaged.

13. Newsanchor

A newsanchor is a person who presents news stories on television or radio. They are often the main host of a news program and provide updates, conduct interviews, and deliver breaking news.

  • For example, “The newsanchor reported on the latest developments in the ongoing investigation.”
  • During a live broadcast, a newsanchor might say, “Coming up next, an exclusive interview with a key witness.”
  • A newsanchor’s role is to inform and engage the audience while maintaining a professional demeanor.

14. Newswhisperer

A newswhisperer is someone who has a knack for uncovering and spreading rumors or insider information. They are often seen as sources of unofficial news or gossip.

  • For instance, “The newswhisperer revealed details about the celebrity’s secret wedding before it was officially announced.”
  • In a discussion about leaks and rumors, someone might say, “The newswhisperer always seems to have the inside scoop.”
  • A newswhisperer might be known for their ability to gather information from various sources and disseminate it to the public.
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15. Newschaser

A newschaser is a journalist or reporter who actively seeks out breaking news stories and rushes to the scene to report on them. They are often the first to arrive at the scene of an event or incident.

  • For example, “The newschaser arrived at the crash site to capture footage for the evening news.”
  • In a newsroom, a newschaser might be assigned to cover developing stories or monitor police scanners for potential news leads.
  • A newschaser might say, “I need to get to the scene quickly and gather as much information as possible.”

16. Newsdigger

A newsdigger is a journalist who actively seeks out and investigates news stories, often going beyond the surface-level information to uncover new details or angles. The term “newsdigger” emphasizes the reporter’s dedication to uncovering important information.

  • For example, “The newsdigger uncovered a major scandal involving government officials.”
  • A newsdigger might say, “I spent weeks digging into this story to get to the truth.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might commend a reporter by saying, “Great job on that investigative piece, you’re a true newsdigger!”

17. Newsleak

A newsleak refers to the unauthorized release of confidential or classified information to the media. It is often used to expose hidden or secretive actions by individuals or organizations.

  • For instance, “The newsleak revealed government corruption at the highest levels.”
  • A journalist might write, “The newsleak provided valuable insights into the inner workings of the company.”
  • In a discussion about journalism ethics, someone might say, “Newsleaks can be controversial, as they involve the disclosure of sensitive information.”

18. Newsjuggler

A newsjuggler is a journalist who is skilled at handling multiple news stories simultaneously. They are able to manage their time and resources effectively to cover various topics and meet tight deadlines.

  • For example, “The newsjuggler covered a breaking news story while also working on a feature article.”
  • A newsjuggler might say, “Being a journalist requires the ability to juggle multiple stories and prioritize tasks.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might compliment a journalist by saying, “You’re a great newsjuggler, always staying on top of multiple stories.”

19. Newspro

A newspro is an experienced and professional newsperson who is highly skilled in their field. They have extensive knowledge and expertise in journalism, and their work is often respected and trusted.

  • For instance, “The newspro provided insightful analysis of the current political situation.”
  • A newspro might say, “Years of experience have taught me the importance of unbiased reporting.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might refer to a respected journalist as a newspro, saying, “We can always count on him to deliver quality news.”

20. Newssleuth

A newssleuth is a journalist who investigates and uncovers hidden or secret information. They are skilled at digging deep into a story and using investigative techniques to reveal important facts or uncover wrongdoing.

  • For example, “The newssleuth exposed a major corporate scandal.”
  • A newssleuth might say, “My job is to uncover the truth and hold those in power accountable.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might commend a journalist by saying, “You’re a talented newssleuth, always finding the hidden details in a story.”

21. Newsoracle

A “newsoracle” is someone who is considered an expert in the field of news. They are knowledgeable and well-informed about current events and can provide valuable insights and analysis.

  • For example, a newsoracle might be invited to appear on a talk show to discuss the latest political developments.
  • In a newsroom, a journalist might ask a newsoracle for their opinion on a breaking news story.
  • Someone might say, “I always turn to that newsoracle for accurate and reliable information.”

22. Newsscribe

A “newsscribe” is a term used to describe a journalist or news writer. They are responsible for researching and writing news articles, reports, and stories for publication.

  • For instance, a newsscribe might be assigned to cover a local election and write an article about the results.
  • In a newsroom, a newsscribe might collaborate with other journalists to investigate and report on a breaking news story.
  • Someone might say, “I enjoy reading articles by that newsscribe. They always provide in-depth and well-researched information.”

23. Newsrider

A “newsrider” is a slang term for a news reporter. They are the individuals who gather information, conduct interviews, and present news stories to the public through various media channels.

  • For example, a newsrider might be sent to cover a press conference and report on the statements made by a public figure.
  • In a newsroom, a newsrider might be assigned to cover a specific beat, such as politics or sports.
  • Someone might say, “That newsrider always delivers accurate and unbiased news coverage.”

24. Newssniffer

A “newssniffer” is someone who closely follows news stories and investigates them in detail. They have a keen eye for uncovering hidden information, inconsistencies, or potential biases in news reporting.

  • For instance, a newssniffer might analyze a news article and point out factual errors or misleading statements.
  • In online discussions, a newssniffer might provide additional context or alternative perspectives on a news story.
  • Someone might say, “I trust that newssniffer to provide a balanced and objective analysis of news events.”

25. Newsrumor

A “newsrumor” refers to unverified or unsubstantiated information that is circulating as news. It is often based on speculation, gossip, or anonymous sources and may lack credibility.

  • For example, a newsrumor might spread on social media about a celebrity’s alleged secret marriage.
  • In a newsroom, journalists strive to separate newsrumors from verified facts before publishing a story.
  • Someone might say, “Don’t believe everything you read online. It could be just another newsrumor.”

26. News raider

A news raider is a slang term for a reporter or journalist who aggressively pursues news stories. The term implies a sense of urgency and determination in seeking out and reporting on breaking news.

  • For example, “The news raider was the first to report on the scandal.”
  • In a newsroom, a journalist might say, “I need a news raider to cover the press conference.”
  • Another might comment, “The news raider’s article was widely shared and discussed on social media.”

27. News messenger

A news messenger is a slang term for a reporter or journalist who delivers news to the public. The term suggests that the reporter is responsible for conveying information accurately and promptly.

  • For instance, “The news messenger delivered the breaking news on live television.”
  • In a newsroom, a journalist might say, “The news messenger is responsible for writing the headline.”
  • Another might comment, “The news messenger’s article provided important updates on the situation.”

28. News voyager

A news voyager is a slang term for a journalist or reporter who travels extensively to cover news stories. The term conveys a sense of adventure and exploration in seeking out and reporting on news from different locations.

  • For example, “The news voyager reported live from the conflict zone.”
  • In a newsroom, a journalist might say, “The news voyager is always on the ground, reporting from the scene.”
  • Another might comment, “The news voyager’s articles provide a unique perspective on global events.”

29. News pundit

A news pundit is a slang term for a commentator or expert who provides analysis and opinion on news topics. The term implies that the person is knowledgeable and experienced in a particular field and often appears on television or other media platforms to share their insights.

  • For instance, “The news pundit provided expert analysis on the current political situation.”
  • During a panel discussion, a commentator might introduce a news pundit by saying, “We have a renowned news pundit joining us today.”
  • Another might comment, “The news pundit’s commentary sparked a lively debate among viewers.”

30. News storyteller

A news storyteller is a slang term for a journalist or reporter who uses storytelling techniques to engage and captivate readers or viewers. The term suggests that the journalist goes beyond the facts to create compelling narratives that resonate with the audience.

  • For example, “The news storyteller’s article painted a vivid picture of the event.”
  • In a newsroom, a journalist might say, “The news storyteller knows how to hook readers with their opening paragraph.”
  • Another might comment, “The news storyteller’s video report was shared widely on social media for its emotional impact.”

31. News wordsmith

A “news wordsmith” is a journalist who has a strong command of language and is skilled at writing news articles. This term emphasizes their ability to craft compelling and informative stories.

  • For example, “The news wordsmith wrote an engaging article that captured the attention of readers.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “I always go to him for advice on writing headlines. He’s a real news wordsmith.”
  • A reader might comment, “I love reading articles by this news wordsmith. They have a way with words.”

32. News advocate

A “news advocate” is a journalist who actively supports and promotes certain causes or ideologies through their reporting. This term suggests that they are not impartial and may have a specific agenda or bias.

  • For instance, “The news advocate wrote a passionate article advocating for environmental conservation.”
  • In a discussion about media bias, someone might say, “Some news advocates are more transparent about their biases, while others try to present themselves as neutral.”
  • A reader might comment, “I prefer news advocates who are upfront about their biases. It helps me understand their perspective.”

33. News correspondent

A “news correspondent” is a reporter who is assigned to cover specific beats or regions for a news organization. They are responsible for gathering information, conducting interviews, and reporting on events happening in their assigned area.

  • For example, “The news correspondent provided live updates from the scene of the protest.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “We need a correspondent to cover the upcoming election in that district.”
  • A viewer might comment, “I always trust the reports from this news correspondent. They have a deep understanding of the region.”

34. News commentator

A “news commentator” is a journalist who provides analysis and opinions on news stories. They offer their perspective and insights to help viewers or readers understand the significance and implications of current events.

  • For instance, “The news commentator shared their thoughts on the latest political scandal.”
  • In a panel discussion, someone might introduce a news commentator by saying, “Our next guest is a respected news commentator with years of experience in the industry.”
  • A viewer might comment, “I appreciate the insights provided by this news commentator. They always offer a unique perspective.”

35. News anchor

A “news anchor” is a television or radio presenter who delivers news stories to the audience. They are often the face of the news organization and are responsible for reporting the news in a clear and authoritative manner.

  • For example, “The news anchor provided updates on the developing story throughout the evening.”
  • In a newsroom, a colleague might say, “We need the news anchor to lead the broadcast tonight.”
  • A viewer might comment, “I trust the news anchor to deliver accurate and unbiased news. They have a commanding presence.”

36. News insider

This term refers to someone who has inside knowledge or information about a particular news story or topic. It suggests that the person is well-connected within the industry and has access to exclusive information.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I spoke to a news insider who gave me some valuable insights into the upcoming election.”
  • In a conversation about a breaking news story, someone might ask, “Do we have any news insiders who can confirm this information?”
  • A news organization might advertise a story with the tagline, “Get the inside scoop from our team of news insiders!”

37. News investigator

This term refers to a newsperson who is dedicated to researching and uncovering information related to a news story. They are often focused on investigative journalism and are skilled at digging deep to find the truth.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I’ve been working as a news investigator for years, exposing corruption and injustice.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of investigative journalism, someone might argue, “News investigators play a crucial role in holding powerful individuals and institutions accountable.”
  • A news organization might highlight their team of investigators, stating, “Our news investigators are committed to uncovering the truth behind every story.”

38. News informant

This term refers to a newsperson who provides information or tips to journalists or news organizations. They often have insider knowledge or access to sensitive information and choose to share it anonymously or confidentially.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I received a tip from a news informant about a potential scandal involving a local politician.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of protecting sources, someone might say, “News informants are crucial for exposing wrongdoing while ensuring their safety.”
  • A news organization might emphasize their commitment to protecting informants, stating, “We value the trust of our news informants and take their confidentiality seriously.”

39. News reporter

This term refers to a newsperson who gathers information, conducts interviews, and writes or presents news stories for a newspaper, magazine, television, or radio. Reporters are typically the frontline journalists who are responsible for delivering news to the public.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I’ve been working as a news reporter for a major news network for over a decade.”
  • In a discussion about the role of reporters in society, someone might argue, “Reporters are the eyes and ears of the public, keeping them informed and holding those in power accountable.”
  • A news organization might promote their team of reporters, stating, “Our reporters are dedicated to delivering accurate and timely news to our audience.”

40. News analyst

This term refers to a newsperson who provides expert analysis and commentary on news stories and current events. They often have specialized knowledge or experience in a particular field and are able to provide valuable insights and interpretations.

  • For example, a journalist might say, “I’m a news analyst specializing in international relations, providing context and understanding to complex geopolitical issues.”
  • In a conversation about the importance of news analysts, someone might say, “News analysts help the audience make sense of the news and navigate through the noise.”
  • A news organization might highlight their team of analysts, stating, “Our news analysts provide in-depth analysis and expert commentary on a wide range of topics.”

41. News documenter

A news documenter refers to a journalist or reporter who collects and reports news stories. The term emphasizes their role in documenting events and providing accurate information.

  • For example, “The news documenter was on the scene within minutes, capturing the unfolding events.”
  • In a discussion about the importance of journalism, someone might say, “News documenters play a crucial role in keeping the public informed.”
  • A person praising a journalist’s work might say, “The news documenter’s article provided a comprehensive overview of the issue.”

42. News editor

A news editor is responsible for overseeing and managing the content of a news publication or broadcast. They ensure that stories are accurate, well-written, and meet the publication’s standards.

  • For instance, “The news editor made significant changes to improve the clarity of the article.”
  • In a newsroom meeting, a news editor might say, “Let’s prioritize this story for the front page.”
  • A journalist might seek feedback from a news editor, saying, “Can you review my article and provide any necessary edits?”

43. Pressman

A pressman is someone who operates a printing press, typically in a newspaper or publishing company. The term may also be used to refer to a journalist or reporter.

  • For example, “The pressman ensured that the newspaper was printed on time and without errors.”
  • In a discussion about the decline of print media, someone might say, “Many pressmen have lost their jobs due to digitalization.”
  • A person highlighting the importance of a free press might say, “Pressmen are essential for holding those in power accountable.”

44. News gal

The term “news gal” is a colloquial and somewhat outdated term used to refer to a female news reporter. It is often used informally and may be considered unprofessional in a formal setting.

  • For instance, “The news gal provided live updates from the scene of the accident.”
  • In a conversation about gender representation in the media, someone might say, “We need more news gals in prominent reporting roles.”
  • A person praising a female news reporter might say, “The news gal’s investigative journalism is top-notch.”

45. News blogger

A news blogger is an individual who writes and publishes news stories on an online platform, typically in the form of a blog. They often provide their own analysis and commentary on current events.

  • For example, “The news blogger shared their perspective on the latest political developments.”
  • In a discussion about the changing landscape of journalism, someone might say, “News bloggers have become influential voices in the media.”
  • A person seeking alternative news sources might say, “I prefer to read news blogs for diverse perspectives.”

46. News photographer

A news photographer is someone who captures images of news events, people, and places for newspapers, magazines, or online publications. They often work in fast-paced, unpredictable environments to capture compelling visuals that tell a story.

  • For example, a news photographer might be assigned to cover a political rally and capture images of the candidate and the crowd.
  • In breaking news situations, a news photographer might rush to the scene to capture images of the event as it unfolds.
  • A news photographer might also be assigned to cover feature stories, such as a local festival or community event.
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47. News producer

A news producer is responsible for overseeing the creation and production of news programs or segments. They work closely with reporters, anchors, and other newsroom staff to ensure that stories are covered accurately and effectively.

  • For instance, a news producer might be in charge of a morning news show and coordinate the segments, interviews, and live reports.
  • In breaking news situations, a news producer might make quick decisions about which stories to cover and how to present the information.
  • A news producer might also work on investigative pieces, collaborating with reporters to gather and analyze information.

48. News presenter

A news presenter, also known as an anchor, is the person who delivers the news on television or radio. They are responsible for presenting information in a clear, concise, and engaging manner, often with the support of visuals and graphics.

  • For example, a news presenter might introduce a breaking news story, provide updates, and interview experts or witnesses.
  • In a news talk show, a news presenter might lead discussions on current events and invite guests to share their perspectives.
  • A news presenter might also deliver special reports or feature stories, showcasing human interest or investigative journalism.

49. News stringer

A news stringer is a freelance journalist or photographer who contributes news stories or images to a news organization. They often work on a per-assignment basis, covering events or stories that the news organization may not have staff available to cover.

  • For instance, a news stringer might be hired to cover a local event or a breaking news story in a remote location.
  • A news stringer might also provide exclusive footage or interviews to a news organization, adding value to their coverage.
  • In some cases, a news stringer might have a specific expertise or access to a particular community, making them a valuable resource for news organizations.
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50. News columnist

A news columnist is a journalist who writes regular opinion pieces or commentaries for a newspaper or online publication. They often have a specific area of expertise or interest and use their platform to share their perspectives and analysis on current events, social issues, or cultural trends.

  • For example, a news columnist might write a weekly column on politics, offering their insights and commentary on the latest developments.
  • A news columnist might also write about lifestyle topics, such as food, fashion, or travel, providing recommendations and personal anecdotes.
  • In some cases, a news columnist might be known for their controversial or provocative opinions, sparking debate and discussion among readers.

51. News anchorperson

A news anchor is a person who presents and delivers the news on television or radio. They are responsible for reporting and providing information to the audience.

  • For example, “The news anchor reported on the latest developments in the political scandal.”
  • During a live broadcast, a news anchor might say, “Coming up next, we have an exclusive interview with the mayor.”
  • A viewer might comment, “I trust this news anchor to deliver accurate and unbiased news.”