Top 54 Slang For Look-At – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing the act of looking at something, English has a plethora of slang terms that add flair and excitement to our everyday conversations. From casual street language to trendy internet jargon, we’ve got you covered with the top slang for “look-at”. Whether you’re trying to keep up with the latest lingo or simply looking to spice up your vocabulary, this listicle is sure to catch your eye and provide you with a fresh perspective on how to describe the act of looking. Get ready to dive into a world of linguistic creativity and discover new ways to express this simple yet essential action!

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1. Check out

This phrase is used to suggest looking at something or someone with interest or admiration. It can also be used to recommend or promote something.

  • For example, “Check out this new restaurant, the food is amazing!”
  • A person might say, “I saw this incredible artwork, you should check it out.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Check out this stylish new outfit I just bought.”

2. Scope out

This slang phrase means to carefully examine or observe something or someone, often with a specific goal in mind.

  • For instance, “I need to scope out the competition before the big game.”
  • A person might say, “Let’s scope out the neighborhood before we decide to move there.”
  • In a discussion about potential vacation destinations, someone might suggest, “We should scope out some travel blogs for recommendations.”

3. Eye up

This phrase means to look at someone or something with desire or attraction.

  • For example, “He couldn’t help but eye up the beautiful woman across the room.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t help but eye up those designer shoes in the store.”
  • In a conversation about celebrities, someone might say, “I always eye up the latest fashion trends they’re wearing.”

4. Peep

This slang term means to take a quick or discreet look at something or someone.

  • For instance, “I just wanted to peep at what they were talking about.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t resist peeping at the surprise party preparations.”
  • In a discussion about a new movie, someone might say, “I peeped at the trailer and it looks really good.”

5. Glance

This term refers to taking a quick or brief look at something or someone.

  • For example, “I took a glance at the newspaper headlines this morning.”
  • A person might say, “I glanced at my watch and realized I was running late.”
  • In a conversation about a crowded room, someone might say, “I couldn’t help but glance at all the interesting people around me.”

6. Gaze

Gaze refers to a long and steady look at something or someone, often with deep interest or admiration.

  • For example, “He gazed out the window at the beautiful sunset.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t help but gaze at her stunning dress.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “They gazed into each other’s eyes, lost in love.”

7. Stare

Stare means to look fixedly or intently at someone or something for a long period of time, often without blinking or looking away.

  • For instance, “She stared at the painting, trying to decipher its meaning.”
  • In a creepy context, someone might say, “He stared at me from across the room, making me feel uncomfortable.”
  • A parent might scold a child, saying, “Don’t stare at strangers, it’s impolite.”

8. Ogle

Ogle means to look at someone with strong desire, especially in a lecherous or inappropriate manner.

  • For example, “He couldn’t help but ogle at the attractive person walking by.”
  • In a disrespectful context, someone might say, “Stop ogling, it’s rude and objectifying.”
  • A person might complain, “I hate how some people ogle at others instead of treating them with respect.”

9. Watch

Watch means to look at someone or something closely and attentively, often for a particular purpose such as monitoring or observing.

  • For instance, “I watched the birds fly in the sky.”
  • In a protective context, someone might say, “I’ll watch out for you, don’t worry.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you watch my bag while I go to the restroom?”

10. Spy

Spy means to secretly observe someone or something, often with the intention of obtaining information or uncovering secrets.

  • For example, “He spied on his neighbors through binoculars.”
  • In a suspenseful context, someone might say, “I think someone is spying on us.”
  • A person might confess, “I used to spy on my sister when we were kids.”

11. View

To view something means to look at or examine it. This term is often used when referring to watching something, such as a movie or a video.

  • For example, “Let’s view the latest episode of our favorite TV show.”
  • A person might say, “I viewed the painting in the museum and was mesmerized by its beauty.”
  • Another might ask, “Have you viewed the new documentary on climate change?”

12. Peruse

To peruse something means to read or examine it carefully. It implies a thorough or detailed examination, rather than just a casual glance.

  • For instance, “I plan to peruse this book over the weekend to understand the author’s perspective.”
  • A person might say, “I perused the contract before signing it to ensure there were no hidden clauses.”
  • Another might recommend, “Take your time to peruse the menu before ordering.”

13. Scan

To scan something means to quickly look over it, often to find specific information or to get a general idea of its contents.

  • For example, “I scanned the article to see if it contained any relevant information.”
  • A person might say, “I scanned the crowd for my friend’s face.”
  • Another might mention, “I scanned the document for any spelling errors before submitting it.”

14. Study

To study something means to examine it closely and in detail, often for the purpose of understanding or learning from it.

  • For instance, “I need to study this textbook to prepare for the exam.”
  • A person might say, “I studied the painting to appreciate the artist’s technique.”
  • Another might mention, “I studied the data to identify any patterns or trends.”

15. Peer

To peer at something means to look closely or carefully at it, often to see it more clearly or to understand it better.

  • For example, “She peered at the tiny print to read the fine details.”
  • A person might say, “I peered through the window to see what was happening outside.”
  • Another might mention, “I peered at the map to find the correct route.”

16. Behold

Behold is a dramatic way to express looking at something with wonder or amazement.

  • For example, “Behold the beauty of the sunset.”
  • In a fantasy novel, a character might say, “Behold! The legendary sword of kings.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Behold the power of modern technology!”

17. Witness

Witness is a word used to describe observing or seeing something happen, often used in a legal context.

  • For instance, “I witnessed the car accident yesterday.”
  • In a courtroom, a witness might say, “I can testify that I witnessed the crime.”
  • A person might ask, “Did anyone witness the event?”

18. Observe

Observe means to watch or notice something carefully, often with the intention of learning or gaining information.

  • For example, “I like to observe nature and learn about different species.”
  • In a science experiment, a student might observe the reaction of different substances.
  • A person might say, “Take a moment to observe the details of this painting.”

19. Spot

Spot means to see or notice something quickly or unexpectedly, often implying a brief glance or momentary observation.

  • For instance, “I spotted a rare bird in the backyard.”
  • In a crowded market, someone might say, “Can you spot the person wearing a red hat?”
  • A person might exclaim, “I just spotted a celebrity!”

20. Catch a glimpse of

Catch a glimpse of means to see or notice something briefly or momentarily, often implying a quick or passing look.

  • For example, “I caught a glimpse of the sunset before it disappeared behind the mountains.”
  • Passing by a store, someone might say, “I caught a glimpse of a beautiful dress in the display window.”
  • A person might say, “If you’re lucky, you might catch a glimpse of a shooting star tonight.”

21. Regard

To give attention or consideration to something or someone. “Regard” is a more formal term for “look-at” and implies a level of respect or interest.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Please regard the instructions on the board.”
  • In a discussion about art, someone might comment, “I really regard the way the artist used color in this painting.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you ever regarded the beauty of a sunset?”

22. Notice

To become aware of something or someone through observation or perception. “Notice” is a common term used to indicate a specific focus on something.

  • For instance, a parent might say, “I noticed that you’ve been working hard on your homework.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might point out, “I couldn’t help but notice her stylish outfit.”
  • A person might ask, “Did you notice any changes in the report?”

23. Focus on

To direct one’s attention or efforts toward a specific thing or person. “Focus on” implies a deliberate act of concentration.

  • For example, a coach might say, “Let’s focus on improving our defense in the next practice.”
  • In a meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to focus on finding a solution to this problem.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you focus on what I’m saying for a moment?”

24. Examine

To inspect or investigate something in detail. “Examine” suggests a thorough and careful analysis.

  • For instance, a scientist might say, “We need to examine the data more closely to draw accurate conclusions.”
  • In a discussion about a crime scene, someone might comment, “The forensic team will examine every piece of evidence.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you examine this document for any errors?”

25. Contemplate

To think deeply or reflect on something. “Contemplate” implies a thoughtful and introspective examination.

  • For example, a philosopher might say, “I often contemplate the meaning of life.”
  • In a conversation about career choices, someone might share, “I’ve been contemplating a career change for a while now.”
  • A person might ask, “Have you ever contemplated the vastness of the universe?”

26. Size up

To size up someone means to visually assess or evaluate them. It is often used to determine someone’s physical appearance or to gauge their abilities or potential.

  • For example, “He walked into the room and immediately started sizing up the competition.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might say, “I like to size up people’s outfits to get inspiration for my own style.”
  • When discussing a job candidate, a recruiter might mention, “During the interview, we will be sizing up their qualifications and experience.”

27. Scope

To scope something means to look around or examine it closely. It is often used to refer to a thorough visual inspection or survey.

  • For instance, “I’m going to scope out the area before we decide where to set up camp.”
  • In a detective novel, a character might say, “I need to scope the scene for any clues.”
  • When discussing a potential purchase, someone might mention, “I scoped out the market and found the best deal.”

28. Eyeball

To eyeball something means to look at it closely or with interest. It is often used to describe a visual examination or scrutiny.

  • For example, “She couldn’t help but eyeball the expensive jewelry in the store window.”
  • In a museum, a visitor might say, “I spent hours eyeballing the intricate details of the paintings.”
  • When discussing a suspicious person, someone might mention, “I saw him eyeballing the entrance, as if he was planning something.”

29. Peek

To peek means to take a quick or furtive look at something. It is often used to describe a brief, discreet visual observation.

  • For instance, “She couldn’t resist peeking through the keyhole to see what was happening.”
  • In a game of hide-and-seek, a child might say, “Don’t peek while I hide!”
  • When discussing a surprise gift, someone might say, “I couldn’t resist taking a peek at what was inside before wrapping it.”

30. Survey

To survey something means to observe or examine it carefully. It is often used to describe a systematic or comprehensive visual inspection.

  • For example, “He climbed to the top of the hill to survey the surrounding landscape.”
  • In a research study, a scientist might say, “We conducted a survey to gather visual data on the wildlife population.”
  • When discussing a renovation project, someone might mention, “We need to survey the area to determine the best course of action.”

31. Catch a glimpse

To catch a quick or fleeting look at something or someone.

  • For example, “I caught a glimpse of the sunset as I was driving home.”
  • In a crowded room, you might say, “I caught a glimpse of my favorite celebrity across the room.”
  • A person might say, “I caught a glimpse of the new painting in the art gallery and it took my breath away.”

32. Take a gander

To take a casual or quick look at something or someone.

  • For instance, “Take a gander at this beautiful sunset.”
  • A person might say, “Take a gander at that fancy car parked outside.”
  • In a store, a salesperson might say, “Take a gander at our new collection.”

33. Glare

To look at someone or something with anger or annoyance.

  • For example, “He gave me a glare when I accidentally bumped into him.”
  • A teacher might say, “Stop staring out the window and pay attention. Don’t give me that glare.”
  • A person might say, “I could feel her glare from across the room.”

34. Rubberneck

To look around or observe something with curiosity or interest.

  • For instance, “People were rubbernecking to see what was causing the traffic jam.”
  • A person might say, “I couldn’t help but rubberneck at the beautiful architecture of the building.”
  • In a crowded street, someone might comment, “There’s so much to rubberneck at in this city.”

35. Feast your eyes on

To look at something with great pleasure or enjoyment.

  • For example, “Feast your eyes on this delicious feast.”
  • A person might say, “Feast your eyes on the stunning view from the top of the mountain.”
  • In an art gallery, someone might say, “Feast your eyes on this masterpiece.”

36. Take in

To “take in” means to observe something or someone and appreciate its beauty or significance. It implies paying attention to the details and fully appreciating what is being seen.

  • For example, “As I walked through the art museum, I took in the beautiful paintings.”
  • A nature enthusiast might say, “I love taking in the breathtaking views of the mountains.”
  • When visiting a new city, a tourist might want to take in all the famous landmarks.
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37. Admire

To “admire” means to look at someone or something with respect, appreciation, or approval. It implies seeing the positive qualities or achievements of the person or object being observed.

  • For instance, “I admire the way she handles difficult situations.”
  • A fan might say, “I admire his talent as a musician.”
  • A person might admire a work of art for its creativity and skill.

38. Devour

To “devour” means to look at something with intense interest or enthusiasm. It implies consuming or absorbing the object of observation with great eagerness or excitement.

  • For example, “He devoured every page of the book in one sitting.”
  • A movie lover might say, “I can’t wait to devour the latest film by my favorite director.”
  • A person might devour a fashion magazine to stay updated on the latest trends.

39. Savor

To “savor” means to look at something and enjoy it slowly and fully, often with a sense of pleasure or delight. It implies taking the time to appreciate and relish the experience of looking at something.

  • For instance, “She savored every bite of the delicious dessert.”
  • A person might savor the view of a sunset by sitting quietly and taking in the beauty of the colors.
  • When visiting a new city, a traveler might savor the sights and sounds of the bustling streets.

40. Gawk

To “gawk” means to look at someone or something in a rude, foolish, or overly curious manner. It implies staring openly and often without consideration for the feelings or privacy of the person being observed.

  • For example, “He couldn’t help but gawk at the celebrity walking by.”
  • A person might gawk at an unusual or outlandish outfit worn by someone.
  • When something unexpected happens, people often stop and gawk at the scene.
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41. Give the once-over

This phrase is often used when someone quickly looks at something or someone to evaluate or assess them. It can imply a quick judgment or evaluation of the appearance or condition of something or someone.

  • For example, “He gave the car a once-over before deciding to buy it.”
  • In a fashion context, someone might say, “I gave her outfit a once-over and decided it looked great.”
  • If someone quickly examines a document, they might say, “I gave the contract a once-over to make sure everything was in order.”

42. Scrutinize

This word means to carefully and thoroughly examine or inspect something or someone. It implies a close and detailed observation or analysis.

  • For instance, “She scrutinized the painting, looking for any flaws in the brushwork.”
  • In a business context, someone might say, “We need to scrutinize the financial statements to identify any discrepancies.”
  • If someone is closely examining a person’s behavior, they might say, “He scrutinized her every move, trying to figure out her intentions.”

43. Take a peek

This phrase means to take a quick and brief look or glance at something or someone. It implies a casual or informal observation.

  • For example, “I couldn’t resist taking a peek at the wrapped presents before Christmas.”
  • If someone quickly looks at a document, they might say, “Let me take a peek at that report before you submit it.”
  • In a curious context, someone might say, “I took a peek through the window to see what was happening inside.”

44. Peer at

This phrase means to look closely or intently at something or someone. It implies a focused and concentrated observation.

  • For instance, “She peered at the tiny writing on the label to read the ingredients.”
  • If someone is trying to see something from a distance, they might say, “He peered at the object through his binoculars.”
  • In a suspicious context, someone might say, “She peered at him, trying to figure out if he was telling the truth.”

45. Set eyes on

This phrase means to see or look at something or someone for the first time. It implies a sense of anticipation or excitement.

  • For example, “When she set eyes on the stunning view, she was speechless.”
  • If someone is describing a memorable encounter, they might say, “The moment I set eyes on her, I knew she was the one.”
  • In a travel context, someone might say, “I can’t wait to set my eyes on the Eiffel Tower when I visit Paris.”

46. Stare down

To stare at someone or something with a strong and unwavering gaze, often with a confrontational or intimidating intent.

  • For example, “He stared down his opponent before the boxing match.”
  • In a tense situation, someone might say, “Don’t try to stare me down.”
  • A person describing a powerful stare might say, “She had the ability to stare down anyone with just a look.”

47. Take a look-see

To take a brief and casual look at something or someone, often out of curiosity or interest.

  • For instance, “Let me take a look-see at that new gadget you got.”
  • When someone asks for your opinion, you might say, “Sure, I’ll take a look-see and let you know what I think.”
  • A person might say, “I just want to take a quick look-see before making a decision.”

48. Lay your peepers on

To direct one’s eyes towards something or someone, often with excitement or anticipation.

  • For example, “You have to lay your peepers on this stunning sunset.”
  • When showing someone a surprise, you might say, “Lay your peepers on this amazing gift I got you.”
  • A person might exclaim, “Lay your peepers on that incredible dress!”

49. Give a once-over

To quickly and casually inspect or examine someone or something.

  • For instance, “I gave the car a once-over before buying it.”
  • When checking someone’s appearance, you might say, “Give yourself a once-over in the mirror before going out.”
  • A person might say, “I’ll give the document a once-over to make sure there are no errors.”

50. Fix your gaze on

To focus one’s gaze on something or someone, often with concentration or intensity.

  • For example, “He fixed his gaze on the horizon, lost in thought.”
  • When captivated by a painting, someone might say, “I can’t help but fix my gaze on this masterpiece.”
  • A person describing a mesmerizing performance might say, “The dancer had the entire audience fixing their gazes on her.”

51. Have a squiz

This phrase is used to suggest taking a quick or casual glance at something or someone. “Squiz” is a slang term for “look” or “glance” commonly used in Australian English.

  • For example, “Let’s have a squiz at the new menu before deciding what to order.”
  • A friend might say, “Have a squiz at this photo I took on my vacation.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might comment, “I had a squiz at the latest trends, but nothing caught my eye.”

52. Give the eye

This expression means to look at someone or something intently or with a suggestive or flirtatious gaze. It implies a more focused and prolonged observation.

  • For instance, “He gave her the eye from across the room.”
  • In a romantic context, someone might say, “I couldn’t help but give him the eye when he walked in.”
  • A person observing a work of art might comment, “I can’t help but give this painting the eye; it’s so captivating.”

53. Take a squint

This phrase is used to suggest taking a quick look or glance at something or someone. “Squint” refers to narrowing one’s eyes to focus on something.

  • For example, “Take a squint at the new car I just bought.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can I take a squint at your notes from the lecture?”
  • In a conversation about a new gadget, someone might say, “I need to take a squint at the specifications before making a decision.”

54. Give a gander

This expression means to take a casual or quick look at something or someone. “Gander” refers to a quick glance or a brief look.

  • For instance, “Give a gander at the sunset; it’s beautiful.”
  • A friend might say, “Give a gander at this video I found; it’s hilarious.”
  • In a conversation about a new book, someone might comment, “I gave it a gander, but it didn’t really catch my interest.”