Top 40 Slang For Majority – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to staying in the know, understanding the latest slang for the majority is essential. Whether you’re a language enthusiast or just looking to up your cool factor, we’ve got you covered. Join us as we unveil the top slang terms that are dominating conversations and social media feeds, so you can stay ahead of the curve and effortlessly blend in with the crowd.

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1. Most

This term refers to the largest portion or number of something. It is often used to describe the majority in a group or situation.

  • For example, “Most people prefer chocolate over vanilla.”
  • In a discussion about voting, one might say, “The candidate with the most votes wins the election.”
  • A person might comment, “I agree with the most popular opinion on this matter.”

2. Bulk

This term refers to the largest part or quantity of something. It is often used to describe the majority or main portion of something.

  • For instance, “The bulk of the work is already done.”
  • In a conversation about a project, someone might say, “Let’s focus on the bulk of the tasks first.”
  • A person might note, “The bulk of the population resides in urban areas.”

3. Masses

This term refers to the common people or general population. It is often used to describe the majority of individuals in a society or group.

  • For example, “The politician promised to fight for the needs of the masses.”
  • In a discussion about social movements, someone might say, “The masses are demanding change.”
  • A person might comment, “The masses have the power to influence government policies.”

4. Plurality

This term refers to the largest number of votes or opinions, but not a majority. It is often used in political contexts to describe a situation where no single option receives more than 50% of the votes.

  • For instance, “Candidate A won the election with a plurality of votes.”
  • In a discussion about voting systems, someone might say, “A plurality voting system can lead to outcomes that don’t reflect the majority’s preference.”
  • A person might note, “In a plurality system, the candidate with the most votes wins, even if they don’t have a majority.”

5. Mainstream

This term refers to the prevailing or dominant trend or opinion. It is often used to describe the ideas, beliefs, or products that are widely accepted or popular among the majority.

  • For example, “That music genre is becoming more mainstream.”
  • In a conversation about fashion, someone might say, “Those trends are definitely going mainstream.”
  • A person might comment, “The mainstream media often shapes public opinion.”

6. Dominant

This term refers to someone or something that holds a position of power or influence over others. It can also describe the most prominent or prevailing characteristic of a group or situation.

  • For example, in a sports competition, a dominant team might be referred to as the “top dog.”
  • In a discussion about animal behavior, one might say, “The dominant male lion leads the pride.”
  • A person describing a strong personality might say, “She’s a dominant force in the workplace.”

7. Prevailing

This term is used to describe something that is currently the most common or widespread.

  • For instance, in a political context, the prevailing party refers to the party that currently holds the most power.
  • In a discussion about fashion trends, one might say, “The prevailing style this season is oversized sweaters.”
  • A person describing the most common opinion might say, “The prevailing belief is that climate change is caused by human activity.”

8. Core

This term refers to the central or most important part of something. It can also describe the fundamental beliefs or values of a group or organization.

  • For example, in a discussion about a software program, the core functionality refers to the essential features.
  • In a conversation about a team’s success, one might say, “The core of their strategy was strong communication.”
  • A person describing the fundamental principles of a religion might say, “Love and compassion are at the core of our beliefs.”

9. Principal

This term is used to describe something that is the most important or influential.

  • For instance, in a school, the principal is the main authority figure.
  • In a discussion about a research study, one might say, “The principal finding of the study was a significant decrease in symptoms.”
  • A person describing the main character in a book might say, “The principal protagonist is a young detective.”

10. Prevalent

This term describes something that is common or widely accepted or practiced.

  • For example, in a discussion about a health issue, one might say, “Smoking is prevalent among teenagers.”
  • In a conversation about a cultural tradition, one might say, “The prevalent belief is that wearing red brings good luck.”
  • A person describing a common problem might say, “One of the most prevalent issues in our society is income inequality.”

11. Predominant

This term refers to something that is the main or most important element or factor in a situation or group.

  • For example, in a discussion about music genres, one might say, “Pop music is the predominant genre in the mainstream music industry.”
  • In a debate about political ideologies, someone might argue, “The role of government should be to support the predominant values of the society.”
  • A person discussing fashion trends might say, “This season, bright colors are the predominant choice for clothing.”

12. Commonality

This term refers to a shared feature or characteristic that exists among a group of people or things.

  • For instance, in a conversation about different cultures, someone might say, “One commonality among many Asian countries is a strong emphasis on family values.”
  • In a discussion about successful entrepreneurs, one might note, “One commonality among them is a willingness to take risks.”
  • A person analyzing data might say, “We found a commonality in the preferences of our target audience, which can help inform our marketing strategy.”

13. Preponderance

This term refers to the state of being superior in number or amount compared to others.

  • For example, in a legal context, someone might say, “The prosecution must prove their case by a preponderance of the evidence.”
  • In a discussion about public opinion, one might argue, “The preponderance of support for this policy indicates its popularity.”
  • A person analyzing survey results might note, “There is a preponderance of positive feedback for this product, indicating high customer satisfaction.”

14. Overwhelming majority

This term refers to a large majority that is significantly greater in number or amount compared to others.

  • For instance, in a political context, someone might say, “The candidate won by an overwhelming majority of votes.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, one might argue, “The overwhelming majority of public opinion is against this policy.”
  • A person analyzing market trends might note, “There is an overwhelming majority of consumers who prefer eco-friendly products.”

15. Vast majority

This term refers to a large majority that encompasses most or almost all of a group.

  • For example, in a discussion about a survey, someone might say, “The vast majority of respondents agreed with the statement.”
  • In a debate about a proposed law, one might argue, “The vast majority of experts support this legislation.”
  • A person analyzing demographic data might note, “The vast majority of the population in this city is under the age of 30.”

16. Supermajority

A supermajority refers to a majority that is larger than a simple majority. It usually requires a higher threshold of votes or support to achieve.

  • For example, in a parliamentary system, a supermajority vote may be needed to pass certain laws or amendments.
  • In a discussion about a controversial decision, someone might say, “It would require a supermajority of votes to overturn this policy.”
  • A political analyst might comment, “The party needs a supermajority in order to have enough votes to push through their agenda.”

17. Consensus

Consensus refers to a general agreement or harmony among a group of people. It signifies that the majority of individuals involved are in agreement.

  • For instance, in a committee meeting, a decision might be reached through consensus rather than a formal vote.
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “We need to find a consensus that satisfies everyone.”
  • A team leader might ask, “Do we have a consensus on the direction we should take?”

18. General public

The term “general public” refers to the majority of people in a society who are not part of a specific group or organization.

  • For example, a government agency might release a statement that is intended for the general public.
  • In a discussion about public opinion, someone might say, “The general public seems to be in favor of this policy.”
  • A marketing campaign might target the general public in order to reach a wide audience.
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19. Main body

The phrase “main body” is often used to refer to the majority or largest part of a group or organization.

  • For instance, in a debate, one might argue, “The main body of evidence supports this conclusion.”
  • In a discussion about a book, a reader might comment, “The main body of the story was engaging and well-written.”
  • A historian might refer to the main body of a document as the most important or substantial part.

20. Major part

The term “major part” is used to describe a significant or substantial portion of a whole.

  • For example, in a group project, someone might say, “I contributed to the major part of the presentation.”
  • In a discussion about a city’s population, one might note, “The major part of the population lives in the urban areas.”
  • A chef might comment, “The major part of the recipe is the secret ingredient that gives it its unique flavor.”

21. Preeminent

This term refers to something or someone that is considered superior or outstanding in its field. It implies a level of excellence or prominence.

  • For example, in a discussion about athletes, one might say, “Michael Jordan is widely regarded as the preeminent basketball player of all time.”
  • A person discussing influential leaders might mention, “Martin Luther King Jr. was a preeminent figure in the civil rights movement.”
  • In a conversation about technology, someone might say, “Apple’s iPhone is the preeminent smartphone brand in the market.”

22. Paramount

This term indicates that something is of the highest importance or priority. It suggests that a particular factor or element is crucial or fundamental.

  • For instance, in a discussion about education, one might say, “Providing quality education to all children should be of paramount importance.”
  • In a conversation about decision-making, someone might argue, “Considering the long-term consequences should be paramount in any strategic plan.”
  • A person discussing personal values might state, “Honesty and integrity are paramount in maintaining healthy relationships.”

23. Supreme

This term signifies the highest level of quality or excellence. It is often used to describe something or someone that is superior or unmatched in a particular domain.

  • For example, in a discussion about pizza, one might say, “New York City is known for its supreme pizza.”
  • A person discussing fashion might mention, “Coco Chanel was a supreme designer who revolutionized the industry.”
  • In a conversation about music, someone might say, “Michael Jackson will always be remembered as the supreme king of pop.”

24. Foremost

This term indicates something or someone who is at the forefront or in a position of primary importance. It implies being ahead or in front of others in a particular field or domain.

  • For instance, in a discussion about scientists, one might say, “Albert Einstein was one of the foremost physicists of his time.”
  • A person discussing literary figures might mention, “William Shakespeare is considered one of the foremost playwrights in history.”
  • In a conversation about business leaders, someone might say, “Elon Musk is one of the foremost innovators in the tech industry.”

25. Primary

This term refers to something that is considered the main or most important element or factor. It implies being of primary significance or relevance.

  • For example, in a discussion about education, one might say, “Providing quality education is the primary goal of the education system.”
  • A person discussing health might mention, “Prevention is the primary focus of maintaining a healthy lifestyle.”
  • In a conversation about politics, someone might say, “The primary responsibility of government is to serve and protect its citizens.”

26. Crowd

A crowd refers to a large gathering of people in one place. It can also be used to describe a group of people with similar interests or opinions.

  • For example, “The concert attracted a huge crowd of fans.”
  • During a protest, someone might shout, “Join the crowd and make your voice heard!”
  • In a discussion about popular trends, a person might say, “The crowd seems to be loving this new fashion style.”

27. Mob

A mob refers to a large group of people, often with a shared purpose or goal. It can also be used to describe a group of people who act in a violent or unruly manner.

  • For instance, “The mob gathered outside the courthouse demanding justice.”
  • During a riot, someone might say, “Avoid the mob and find a safe place.”
  • In a historical context, a person might discuss, “The mob mentality that led to the French Revolution.”

28. Herd

A herd refers to a large group of animals, particularly grazing animals. It can also be used metaphorically to describe a group of people who follow the same ideas or behaviors.

  • For example, “The herd of cattle moved together across the field.”
  • In a discussion about conformity, someone might say, “Don’t just follow the herd, think for yourself.”
  • When talking about a group of fans, a person might note, “The band has a loyal herd of followers.”

29. Horde

A horde refers to a large group of people, often depicted as unruly or chaotic. It can also be used to describe a swarm of insects or other creatures.

  • For instance, “The horde of shoppers rushed into the store on Black Friday.”
  • During a zombie apocalypse scenario, someone might say, “We need to defend ourselves from the horde of zombies.”
  • In a discussion about historical invasions, a person might mention, “The horde of Mongol warriors conquered vast territories.”

30. Swarm

A swarm refers to a large group of insects, such as bees or locusts, that move together in a coordinated manner. It can also be used to describe a large group of people or objects that move quickly or in a chaotic manner.

  • For example, “A swarm of bees descended upon the picnic area.”
  • During a protest, someone might say, “The streets were filled with a swarm of demonstrators.”
  • In a discussion about social media, a person might mention, “The swarm of negative comments on the post was overwhelming.”

31. Throng

This term refers to a large group of people gathered closely together. It often implies a sense of excitement or chaos.

  • For example, “A throng of fans gathered outside the concert venue.”
  • In a description of a protest, one might say, “The streets were filled with a throng of demonstrators.”
  • A news article might report, “A throng of shoppers lined up outside the store for the Black Friday sale.”

32. Legion

This term is used to describe a large number of people or things. It can also imply a sense of unity or collective action.

  • For instance, “A legion of volunteers showed up to help with the charity event.”
  • In a discussion about a popular movement, one might say, “The legion of supporters was instrumental in bringing about change.”
  • A writer might describe a crowded stadium as “filled with the cheering legion of fans.”
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33. Multitude

This word refers to a large number of people or things. It can imply a sense of variety or diversity within the group.

  • For example, “A multitude of options were available at the buffet.”
  • In a description of a festival, one might say, “The event attracted a multitude of attendees from different backgrounds.”
  • A journalist might report, “The city streets were filled with a multitude of protesters demanding change.”

34. Troop

This term is often used to describe a large organized group of people, especially in a military or scouting context. It can also refer to a group of performers or actors.

  • For instance, “A troop of soldiers marched in formation.”
  • In a discussion about a theater production, one might say, “The troop of actors delivered a stellar performance.”
  • A travel blogger might write, “I joined a troop of hikers on a challenging trek through the mountains.”

35. Crew

This word typically refers to a group of people who work together, especially on a ship, aircraft, or film set. It can also be used more broadly to describe any collaborative team or group.

  • For example, “The crew of the ship worked together to navigate through the storm.”
  • In a discussion about a sports team, one might say, “The crew showed great teamwork in their victory.”
  • A project manager might say, “I’ve assembled a skilled crew to tackle this challenging project.”

36. Team

A team refers to a group of people working together towards a common goal or objective. It can also refer to a group of individuals who compete together in a sports event or game.

  • For example, “Our team won the championship!”
  • In a work setting, someone might say, “Let’s divide into teams and tackle this project.”
  • A sports fan might cheer, “Go team, go!”

37. Gang

A gang is a group of individuals who associate closely and often engage in criminal activities together. However, it can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or a group of people who share a common interest or purpose.

  • For instance, “He’s part of a notorious gang that operates in the city.”
  • In a non-criminal context, one might say, “I’m meeting up with my gang for a movie night.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as a gang, saying, “We’re the best gang around!”

38. Posse

Originally referring to a group of people summoned by a sheriff to assist in enforcing the law, posse now generally refers to a group of individuals who come together for a specific purpose or shared interest.

  • For example, “The sheriff gathered a posse to track down the fugitive.”
  • In a modern context, one might say, “I’m going out with my posse tonight.”
  • A group of friends might jokingly refer to themselves as a posse, saying, “We’re rolling deep with our posse!”

39. Clan

A clan is a close-knit group of people who are typically related by blood or marriage and share a common ancestry or heritage. It can also refer to a group of individuals who are united by a strong bond or common interest.

  • For instance, “He comes from a proud Scottish clan.”
  • In a non-ancestral context, someone might say, “Our gaming clan is the best in the league.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as a clan, saying, “We’re the coolest clan in town!”

40. Tribe

A tribe traditionally refers to a social group composed of people who share a common culture, language, and often live in close proximity to each other. In a modern context, it can also refer to a close-knit group of friends or a group of people who share a common interest or identity.

  • For example, “The indigenous tribe has preserved their traditions for centuries.”
  • In a non-indigenous context, someone might say, “We’re a tribe of foodies, always exploring new restaurants.”
  • A group of friends might refer to themselves as a tribe, saying, “We’re a tight-knit tribe, always there for each other!”