Top 45 Slang For Make Clear – Meaning & Usage

When it comes to expressing yourself clearly and effectively, having the right slang can make all the difference. In this article, we’ve gathered the top slang terms that will help you make your point crystal clear. Whether you’re trying to get your message across in a casual conversation or a professional setting, we’ve got you covered with the latest and most useful phrases to ensure you’re understood loud and clear. So, buckle up and get ready to level up your communication game with our curated list of slang for make clear!

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1. Break it down

This phrase means to explain something in a clear and easy-to-understand manner.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break it down for you: the subject is divided into three main categories.”
  • In a conversation about complex ideas, someone might ask, “Can you break down the concept into simpler terms?”
  • A presenter might say, “Now, let’s break down the steps of this process one by one.”

2. Spell it out

To “spell it out” means to provide explicit details or instructions in order to make something clear.

  • For instance, a boss might say, “I need you to spell out exactly what needs to be done.”
  • In a discussion about expectations, someone might ask, “Can you spell out what you mean by ‘high quality’?”
  • A teacher might say, “I want you to spell out the steps of the scientific method in your lab report.”

3. Lay it out

This phrase means to present information or instructions in a clear and organized manner.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Let me lay out the plan for the project.”
  • In a meeting, someone might ask, “Can you lay out the steps we need to take to achieve our goal?”
  • A presenter might say, “I will lay out the main points of my argument in this presentation.”

4. Clear the air

To “clear the air” means to address and resolve any misunderstandings or conflicts in order to create a more positive and open atmosphere.

  • For instance, in a heated argument, someone might say, “Let’s take a break to clear the air.”
  • In a team meeting, a leader might say, “We need to clear the air and address any concerns or issues.”
  • A friend might say, “We should clear the air and talk about what happened.”

5. Get to the bottom of it

This phrase means to investigate and uncover the true cause or explanation of something in order to make it clear.

  • For example, a detective might say, “I’m determined to get to the bottom of this mystery.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might say, “We need to get to the bottom of what’s causing this issue.”
  • A journalist might say, “I will investigate further to get to the bottom of this scandal.”

6. Make it crystal clear

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for clarity and understanding. It means to make something completely and unmistakably clear.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I want to make it crystal clear that cheating is not tolerated in this class.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Let’s make it crystal clear what our goals are for this project.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “I need you to make it crystal clear to me why you were late.”

7. Shed light on

This phrase means to provide information or insight that helps to clarify a situation or topic. It is often used when someone wants to explain or make something clearer.

  • For instance, a journalist might say, “I interviewed the witness to shed light on the events that took place.”
  • In a scientific study, researchers might say, “Our findings shed light on the causes of this disease.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you shed some light on why he’s been acting so strange lately?”

8. Simplify

To simplify means to make something less complicated or easier to understand. It involves breaking down complex ideas or processes into simpler and more manageable parts.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let’s simplify this math problem so that everyone can understand.”
  • In a cooking recipe, the instructions might say, “To simplify this dish, use pre-made sauce instead of making it from scratch.”
  • A manager might tell their team, “We need to simplify our communication process to avoid confusion.”

9. Clarify

To clarify means to make something clear and understandable by providing additional information or explanations. It involves removing any ambiguity or confusion.

  • For instance, a speaker might say, “Let me clarify my previous statement.”
  • In a legal document, a lawyer might say, “This clause needs to be clarified to avoid any misinterpretation.”
  • A friend might ask, “Can you clarify what you meant by that comment?”

10. Get the message across

This phrase means to successfully communicate or convey a message in a way that ensures understanding. It implies that the intended message has been received and comprehended.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “I used visual aids to help get the message across.”
  • In a negotiation, someone might say, “I need to get my point across clearly and convincingly.”
  • A teacher might tell their students, “Your job is to get the message across in your presentations.”

11. Elaborate

To elaborate means to provide more information or further explanation about something. It is often used when someone wants to make their point clearer or provide additional context.

  • For example, if someone asks for clarification, you might say, “Can you elaborate on what you mean?”
  • In a discussion, a person might elaborate on their previous statement by saying, “Let me elaborate on why I think this is important.”
  • A teacher might ask a student to elaborate on their answer to encourage deeper thinking.
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12. Put it in plain English

This phrase is used when someone wants a complex or confusing concept to be explained in a way that is easy to understand. It implies the need for clear and straightforward language.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to understand a technical explanation, they might say, “Can you put it in plain English for me?”
  • In a presentation, a speaker might say, “Let me put this in plain English so everyone can follow along.”
  • A writer might use this phrase when editing their work to ensure it is accessible to a wide audience.

13. Get it straight

To “get it straight” means to understand something clearly and without confusion. It is often used when someone wants to ensure that others have a clear understanding of a particular topic or idea.

  • For example, if someone is explaining a complex concept and wants to check for understanding, they might say, “Do you get it straight?”
  • In a conversation, one person might say to another, “Let’s get it straight before we move forward.”
  • A teacher might ask their students, “Did everyone get it straight? Any questions?”

14. Make sense of

To “make sense of” something means to understand or interpret it. It is used when someone wants to comprehend a complex or confusing situation or concept.

  • For instance, if someone is struggling to understand a difficult book, they might say, “I’m trying to make sense of this chapter.”
  • In a group discussion, someone might say, “Let’s try to make sense of these conflicting opinions.”
  • A scientist might say, “We need more data to make sense of these results.”

15. Untangle

To “untangle” means to clarify or unravel a complicated or confusing situation. It is often used when someone wants to make a complex issue easier to understand.

  • For example, if someone is trying to explain a convoluted problem, they might say, “Let me untangle this for you.”
  • In a team meeting, someone might suggest, “We need to untangle these conflicting priorities before we can move forward.”
  • A journalist might write an article to untangle the details of a complex news story.

16. Make it easy to understand

This means to explain something in a way that is clear and easily comprehensible. It involves breaking down complex concepts or ideas into simpler terms.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me simplify this equation so that everyone can understand.”
  • In a business presentation, a speaker might say, “I’ll try to simplify our company’s financials for you.”
  • A writer might say, “I want to simplify this article so that it’s accessible to a wider audience.”

17. Get to the bottom of

This phrase means to investigate or discover the underlying cause or truth of a situation. It implies digging deep and finding the root or core of a problem or issue.

  • For instance, a detective might say, “I’m determined to get to the bottom of this mysterious case.”
  • In a conversation about a scandal, someone might say, “We need to get to the bottom of these allegations and find out the truth.”
  • A journalist might say, “I’m going to interview multiple sources to get to the bottom of this story.”

18. Set the record straight

This expression means to provide accurate information or correct any misconceptions or misunderstandings. It involves ensuring that the true version of events or facts is known.

  • For example, a politician might say, “I want to set the record straight on my stance regarding this issue.”
  • In a heated debate, someone might say, “Let me set the record straight by presenting the actual statistics.”
  • A celebrity might use this phrase to address rumors or false information about themselves, saying, “I need to set the record straight about these tabloid stories.”

19. Break it down into simple terms

This means to explain something using simple language that can be easily understood by anyone, regardless of their expertise or background knowledge. It involves avoiding technical jargon and using everyday language.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “I’ll break down this complex scientific concept into simple terms for you.”
  • In a presentation about a complex product, a speaker might say, “Let me break it down into simple terms so that everyone can understand how it works.”
  • A writer might say, “I’m going to break down this complicated topic into simple terms in this article.”

20. Make it explicit

This phrase means to be extremely clear, direct, and specific in conveying information or instructions. It involves leaving no room for ambiguity or confusion.

  • For example, a manager might say, “Make it explicit in your report what action needs to be taken.”
  • In a conversation about expectations, someone might say, “Let’s make it explicit what each team member’s responsibilities are.”
  • A teacher might say, “When giving instructions, make it explicit what steps the students need to follow.”

21. Make it transparent

This phrase is used to indicate the need for something to be made clear and easily understood by others.

  • For example, a manager might say, “We need to make it transparent to the team why this decision was made.”
  • In a discussion about company policies, someone might suggest, “Let’s make it transparent to all employees what the expectations are.”
  • A teacher might tell a student, “You need to make your reasoning transparent in your essay.”

22. Clarify the situation

This phrase is used to express the need for someone to explain and make a situation clear to others.

  • For instance, in a group discussion, someone might say, “Can you please clarify the situation for those who are not familiar with it?”
  • In a meeting, a team member might ask, “Could you clarify the situation regarding the budget cuts?”
  • A friend might say, “I’m confused about what happened. Can you clarify the situation for me?”

23. Make it evident

This phrase is used to emphasize the need for something to be made obvious and apparent to others.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “We need to make it evident to the audience why this product is superior.”
  • In a debate, someone might argue, “The facts make it evident that climate change is real and urgent.”
  • A parent might tell their child, “Your actions make it evident that you are not telling the truth.”

24. Make it lucid

This phrase is used to convey the need for something to be made clear and easy to understand by others.

  • For instance, a teacher might say, “You need to make your explanation lucid so that everyone in the class can follow.”
  • In a work presentation, someone might suggest, “Let’s make it lucid for the clients why our solution is the best.”
  • A writer might receive feedback to “make the plot twists more lucid for the readers.”
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25. Make it unmistakable

This phrase is used to stress the need for something to be made clear and impossible to misunderstand by others.

  • For example, a coach might say, “We need to make it unmistakable to the players what the game plan is.”
  • In a legal document, someone might insist, “We need to make it unmistakable that the terms are non-negotiable.”
  • A supervisor might tell an employee, “Your performance needs improvement. Make it unmistakable that you understand what is expected of you.”

26. Make it comprehensible

This phrase means to make something clear and easy to understand. It is often used when explaining complex ideas or concepts.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “I need to make this lesson more comprehensible for my students.”
  • In a business meeting, someone might say, “Can you make your proposal more comprehensible? I’m having trouble following.”
  • A presenter might ask the audience, “Is the information presented comprehensible or do you have any questions?”

27. Make it unambiguous

This phrase means to remove any ambiguity or uncertainty from a statement or situation. It is used when there is a need for clarity and specificity.

  • For instance, a manager might say, “Please make your instructions unambiguous so that everyone understands.”
  • In a legal document, a lawyer might write, “The terms of this agreement should be unambiguous and easily understood.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you make your answer unambiguous? I’m not sure what you mean.”

28. Make it intelligible

This phrase means to make something clear and easy to comprehend. It is often used when dealing with complex or technical information.

  • For example, a scientist might say, “I need to make my research findings intelligible to a broader audience.”
  • In a software development team, a programmer might say, “Let’s make the code comments more intelligible so that other developers can understand.”
  • A presenter might ask the audience, “Is the information presented intelligible or should I explain further?”

29. Make it coherent

This phrase means to make something logically connected and consistent. It is used when there is a need for clarity and organization in ideas or thoughts.

  • For instance, a writer might say, “I need to make this paragraph more coherent by adding transition words.”
  • In a team brainstorming session, someone might say, “Let’s make our ideas more coherent by grouping them into categories.”
  • A teacher might ask a student, “Can you make your argument more coherent? It seems disjointed.”

30. Decode

This word means to decipher or interpret a message or information that is difficult to understand. It is often used in the context of decoding secret or coded messages.

  • For example, a spy might say, “I need to decode this message to find out the enemy’s plans.”
  • In a puzzle game, a player might say, “I finally decoded the hidden message and unlocked the next level.”
  • A computer programmer might say, “I’m trying to decode this encrypted file to retrieve the data.”

31. Illuminate

To make something clear or understandable by providing additional information or clarification. “Illuminate” can also refer to making something more visible or bright.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me illuminate this concept for you.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might ask, “Can you please illuminate the details?”
  • A writer might use the phrase, “The author’s vivid descriptions illuminate the setting.”

32. Clear up

To provide clarity or understanding by resolving confusion or ambiguity. “Clear up” can also mean to make something physically clean or tidy.

  • For instance, in a meeting, someone might say, “Let me clear up any misunderstandings.”
  • If there is confusion about a situation, someone might ask, “Can you clear this up for me?”
  • A person might say, “I need to clear up my desk before leaving for the day.”

33. Get across

To successfully communicate or make something understood by others. “Get across” can also mean to physically cross a distance or obstacle.

  • For example, a presenter might say, “I want to make sure my message gets across to the audience.”
  • In a conversation, someone might say, “I’m not sure if I’m getting my point across.”
  • A person might ask, “How can I get this idea across to my team?”

34. Unravel

To make something clear or understandable by unraveling or solving a mystery or complex situation. “Unravel” can also refer to the act of undoing or untangling something.

  • For instance, in a detective story, the protagonist might unravel the mystery.
  • If there is confusion about a situation, someone might say, “Let’s unravel this and find the truth.”
  • A person might ask, “Can you help me unravel this complicated problem?”

35. Break it down for me

To provide a clear and simplified explanation of something. “Break it down for me” is a colloquial phrase often used to ask for a step-by-step or simplified explanation.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Let me break it down for you so it’s easier to understand.”
  • In a discussion about a complex topic, someone might ask, “Can you break it down for me? I’m having trouble following.”
  • A person might say, “I need someone to break down the process for me so I can replicate it.”

36. Lay it on the line

This phrase means to speak honestly and directly, without holding back or sugarcoating. It implies that the speaker is sharing information in a clear and straightforward manner.

  • For example, a boss might say to an employee, “I need you to lay it on the line and tell me what went wrong with the project.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult situation, someone might say, “Let’s lay it on the line and address the issues head-on.”
  • A friend seeking advice might ask, “Can you lay it on the line and tell me if I’m making a mistake?”

37. Nail down

To “nail down” something means to determine or finalize it with certainty. It implies the act of securing or firmly establishing a specific detail or decision.

  • For instance, a project manager might say, “We need to nail down the deadlines for each task.”
  • In a discussion about plans, someone might say, “Let’s nail down the date and time for our meeting.”
  • A friend making plans might ask, “Can we nail down the restaurant for dinner tonight?”

38. Shed some light on

This phrase means to offer information or clarification that helps to explain or make something clearer. It implies bringing understanding or insight to a particular topic.

  • For example, a teacher might say, “Can you shed some light on this concept for the class?”
  • In a discussion about a complex issue, someone might ask, “Could you shed some light on the different perspectives involved?”
  • A colleague seeking guidance might say, “I’m struggling with this project. Can you shed some light on the best approach?”

39. Simplify it for me

This phrase is a request for someone to explain or present information in a simpler or more easily understandable way. It implies the desire to reduce complexity or confusion.

  • For instance, a student might ask a teacher, “Can you simplify this equation for me?”
  • In a conversation about a complicated process, someone might say, “I need you to simplify it for me so I can follow along.”
  • A coworker seeking clarity might ask, “Can you simplify the instructions for this task?”

40. Sort out

To “sort out” something means to resolve or clarify a situation or problem. It implies the act of organizing or arranging things in a clear and understandable way.

  • For example, a mediator might say, “Let’s sit down and sort out this disagreement.”
  • In a discussion about conflicting information, someone might say, “We need to sort out the facts from the rumors.”
  • A friend seeking advice might ask, “Can you help me sort out my feelings about this relationship?”

41. Tell it like it is

To tell something exactly as it is, without sugarcoating or embellishing.

  • For example, “I appreciate your honesty. You always tell it like it is.”
  • In a discussion about a controversial topic, someone might say, “Let’s stop beating around the bush and tell it like it is.”
  • If someone is being evasive, you might say, “Quit dancing around the issue and tell it like it is.”

42. Unpack

To break down and examine something to gain a deeper understanding or clarity.

  • For instance, in a debate, one might say, “Let’s unpack this argument and examine its flaws.”
  • When discussing a complex concept, someone might ask, “Can you unpack that idea for me?”
  • In a therapy session, a therapist might encourage a patient to “unpack” their feelings and thoughts.
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43. Break it to me

To inform someone about something unpleasant or challenging in a gentle or careful manner.

  • For example, if someone is about to receive bad news, they might say, “Just break it to me gently.”
  • In a conversation about a difficult topic, one person might say, “I need to break it to you, but…”
  • When discussing a sensitive issue, someone might ask, “How should I break it to them?”

44. Get it off your chest

To openly talk about something that has been bothering or weighing on your mind.

  • For instance, if someone seems upset, you might say, “What’s bothering you? Get it off your chest.”
  • In a therapy session, a therapist might encourage a patient to “get it off their chest” by sharing their emotions.
  • When discussing a personal issue, a friend might say, “You should talk to someone and get it off your chest.”

45. Hit the nail on the head

To precisely and accurately pinpoint or understand something.

  • For example, if someone makes a correct observation, you might say, “You hit the nail on the head.”
  • In a discussion about a problem, someone might say, “You’ve really hit the nail on the head with that analysis.”
  • When someone accurately describes a situation, you might say, “You’ve hit the nail on the head with your assessment.”